A Right Royal Opportunity: The Big Wedding In Digital Media | paidContent

via A Right Royal Opportunity: The Big Wedding In Digital Media | paidContent.

All manner of service providers has, for weeks, been peppering our inboxes with announcements of features they hope will help them monetise, broadcast and otherwise draw audience from the biggest royal occasion in decades.

But when the main event—the actual wedding itself—actually takes place, don’t expect a blow-by-blow account: cell signals are getting blocked during the ceremony in Westminster Abbey. (Update: According to CBS (NYSE: CBS), Scotland Yard is refuting the blocked call report.)

Police confirmed to Yahoo’s wedding bloggers that cell signals will be blocked in Westminster Abbey from early Friday morning and will continue to be blocked for the duration of the ceremony. That will mean no rings while the rings get exchanged—but it will also mean to live tweets from any of the more social media-minded attendees. We’ll see if someone manages to crack through that barricade tomorrow. Twitter has been one of the most-used mediums for chatter about the wedding up to now:

Web

  • A video opportunity? Every major network will be providing streaming of the event, and the portals might also come into their own here, too. But, as the happy day is a UK public holiday, most viewers will likely be in front of a TV, not a PC.
  • Skateboarding Corgies? YouTube (NSDQ: GOOG), in its latest big live stream, gets an official nod from Buckingham Palace for its broadcast, through the official Royal Channelon the site.
  • Does one ‘Yahoo’? The search portal has put in place its own Royal Channel, aggregating not only a live feed of its own, but also photos, articles, games, chat boards, localised content, and whatever else it will think might be relevant that will drive more users to the site.
  • Traffic surge contingency? Finding a site on which to watch the royal wedding won’t be hard—more difficult might be trying to avoid it—but what might prove a challenge is finding a portal that isn’t over-congested.
  • Same goes for mobile networks. Operators are already looking to boost capacity at pressure areas in the UK (such as the village where Kate Middleton’s family lives in Berkshire, which has become something of a pilgrimage ground for royal fans) where mobile networks are expected to see heavy use.

Mobile

  • Apps are popular. Thirty-four percent of people have downloaded royal wedding apps, according to a MyVoucherCodes survey of 1,700 UK adults – average number of apps: two. Eighty-three percent of those apps are free, average price of the paid apps is at the low end of the range: £0.79 ($1.30). The breakdown of users: 39 percent on iPhone; 32 percent on Android; 21 percent on Blackberry; six percent on Nokia (NYSE: NOK) and two percent ‘other.’
  • The mappy couple. Some apps are informative, if a bit stalkerish (“track the happy couple on your Android phone”, and yourself if you’re hanging out near them, using “exquisite” hand-drawn maps, promises iDo).
  • Play along. (“celebrate the royal wedding by spotting the 50 romantic comedies hidden in our canvas!” says Say What You See; or, Blabber, the word-prediction game app for those watching TV (guessing what pundits will say).
  • News and information. Rough Guides’ Royal walking tour for iPhones, numerous apps from broadcasters aggregating video and other coverage (such as this one, for Android and iOS, from UK news agency ITN). 
  • Papers have jumped aboardThe Times and the Mirror) have special apps for the event. These are effectively extensions of the kinds of magazine supplements the newspapers love to publish around special events.
  • The official app. The Royal Family itself is also getting in on the act, with 3D apps of Westminster Abbey and anapp using archives from the Royal Collection showcasing royal weddings past.
  • Scan your TV: CNN will direct its mobile-touting TV viewers to its mobile website using on-air barcodes, which it hopes viewers will scan with their handset.

Social media

  • The Twoyal Twedding: “In case you haven’t seen it, the official hashtag for the Royal Wedding is #rw2011,” says @ClarenceHouse, one of the monarchy’s royal homes.
  • Across the pond: Americans are tweeting more (40 percent) about the event than Brits (31 percent), says Trendrr (via CNN) – with traffic spanning from New Haven, CT, to Tusla, OK, and beyond.
  • Royal gush: 46 percent of tweets are positive, 43 percent neutral, 12 percent negative, Trendrr says (via CNN) – there were 5,000 per hour last week in total.
  • Broadcasters’ love affair with social sites continues: CNN is encouraging viewers to collect virtual stickers by “checking in”, via GetGlue, to its coverage, over which CNN will lay tweets and comments solicited via its #CNNtv hashtag, handpicked from celebrities and via Facebook Status Update. It’s also soliciting multi-media material viaiReport.

Royal Wedding: A Two-Screen Experience Like You\’ve Never Seen

via Royal Wedding: A Two-Screen Experience Like You\’ve Never Seen.

Producers are working around the clock ahead of the Royal Wedding live broadcast, which is set to begin at 4 a.m. ET on most stations. But they aren’t just prepping TV coverage; they’re also working to extend their broadcasts and engage users across as many channels as possible.

With the proliferation of devices for media consumption — think laptops, tablets and smartphones, in addition to TV sets — viewers are no longer consuming media on a single platform. Instead, they’re tweeting on their smartphones while viewing on a TV program, or a watching a second show on their tablets during a commercial.

It’s these viewers — the ones that Mark Ghuneim, the founder and CEO of marketing agency Wireset and social media monitoring tool Trendrr, calls the “hyperactives” — that network producers and digital strategists are pursuing ahead of tomorrow morning’s broadcast.


The Importance of “Hyperactives”


Unlike “massive passives,” which make up the majority of the television-viewing audience, hyperactives are actively discussing, endorsing and engaging with TV content on different networks in real time, and encouraging their friends to do so as well.

“If someone you trust says, ‘Oh my god, that’s really cool, I’m watching this,’ in real time, you want to go check it out,” says Ghuneim. “Because your social graph is made up of people you trust, when they recommend something, you’re more likely to take a look. The social web thus acts as a funnel in which friend recommendations are prompting tune-ins on TV and online in real time.”

Given that 2 billion viewers are expected to tune in for the Royal Wedding, networks are going all-out to create more engaging and more accessible experiences by streaming their coverage on as many devices as possible, as well as maintaining an active presence on Facebook and Twitter.


ABC News: A Cross-Channel Strategy


Of all the networks we spoke to, ABC News is pursuing the most aggressive cross-channel strategy. The network will be livestreaming on ABCNews.com, its apps for iPhone and iPad devices, Hulu, Yahoo and onFacebook.

ABC News correspondent David Muir will be interacting directly with followers on Twitter and Facebookthroughout the day. The network will also keep track of trending conversations in order to bridge online and on-air discussions, ABC News Digital executive producer of innovation Andrew Morse tells us.

ABC is also asking Twitter users to tweet in comments throughout the day using hashtags #ROYALMESS and #ROYALSUCCESS, and to the big moment with #ROYALKISS, a strategy Ghuneim says is especially effective for increasing Twitter conversation about a broadcast.

“What we’ve come to realize more and more through major events — elections, major celebrations, breaking news events and tragedies — is that the two-screen experience is becoming more and more ubiquitous,” says Morse. “More people are interacting, watching while using their tablets and their iPhones, and we want to create the richest two-screen experience we can.”


CNN: Uniting TV, Mobile & Social


CNN will be monitoring Twitter commentary tagged with #CNNtv during the live broadcast, and display selected tweets in a “slow stream” alongside video coverage. Tweets and Facebook status updates from so-called “relevant influentials,” such as celebrities and friends of the Royal Family, will appear in the lower-third banner of the broadcast. Viewers are also encouraged to check in on GetGlue to unlock a series of Royal-Wedding themed stickers.

Most unusually, two-dimensional barcodes will appear on-screen throughout the day, prompting viewers with smartphones to scan the code to load additional CNN coverage on their smartphones.

In addition, CNN will be tweeting live updates from @royalweddingCNN, as well as from the accounts of individual presenters Anderson CooperPiers MorganRichard QuestKiran Chetry and Cat Deeley throughout the event.

AP Live, CBS News, ET TheInsider.com and the UK Press Association will all be hosting live broadcasts onLivestream, whilst the BBC will host its own livestream and live blog. Royal correspondent Peter Hunt will be taking questions on Twitter leading up to and on the big day.


Why Now & What’s Next?


We have seen heavy multimedia and cross-channel coverage during past global events, but never on this scale before.

The reason, Ghuneim says, is because many networks are beginning to understand the importance of an engaged audience across multiple channels, and have had the advantage of months of planning ahead of the broadcast.

The challenges involve understanding how consumers use different kinds of devices, and how to optimize the experience for each device.

For more information about how to follow the Royal Wedding online, please see our comprehensive guide.

Disclosure: CNN and ABC News are Mashable content partners.

Royal Wedding: A Two-Screen Experience Like You\’ve Never Seen

via Royal Wedding: A Two-Screen Experience Like You\’ve Never Seen.

Producers are working around the clock ahead of the Royal Wedding live broadcast, which is set to begin at 4 a.m. ET on most stations. But they aren’t just prepping TV coverage; they’re also working to extend their broadcasts and engage users across as many channels as possible.

With the proliferation of devices for media consumption — think laptops, tablets and smartphones, in addition to TV sets — viewers are no longer consuming media on a single platform. Instead, they’re tweeting on their smartphones while viewing on a TV program, or a watching a second show on their tablets during a commercial.

It’s these viewers — the ones that Mark Ghuneim, the founder and CEO of marketing agency Wireset and social media monitoring tool Trendrr, calls the “hyperactives” — that network producers and digital strategists are pursuing ahead of tomorrow morning’s broadcast.


The Importance of “Hyperactives”


Unlike “massive passives,” which make up the majority of the television-viewing audience, hyperactives are actively discussing, endorsing and engaging with TV content on different networks in real time, and encouraging their friends to do so as well.

“If someone you trust says, ‘Oh my god, that’s really cool, I’m watching this,’ in real time, you want to go check it out,” says Ghuneim. “Because your social graph is made up of people you trust, when they recommend something, you’re more likely to take a look. The social web thus acts as a funnel in which friend recommendations are prompting tune-ins on TV and online in real time.”

Given that 2 billion viewers are expected to tune in for the Royal Wedding, networks are going all-out to create more engaging and more accessible experiences by streaming their coverage on as many devices as possible, as well as maintaining an active presence on Facebook and Twitter.


ABC News: A Cross-Channel Strategy


Of all the networks we spoke to, ABC News is pursuing the most aggressive cross-channel strategy. The network will be livestreaming on ABCNews.com, its apps for iPhone and iPad devices, Hulu, Yahoo and onFacebook.

ABC News correspondent David Muir will be interacting directly with followers on Twitter and Facebookthroughout the day. The network will also keep track of trending conversations in order to bridge online and on-air discussions, ABC News Digital executive producer of innovation Andrew Morse tells us.

ABC is also asking Twitter users to tweet in comments throughout the day using hashtags #ROYALMESS and #ROYALSUCCESS, and to the big moment with #ROYALKISS, a strategy Ghuneim says is especially effective for increasing Twitter conversation about a broadcast.

“What we’ve come to realize more and more through major events — elections, major celebrations, breaking news events and tragedies — is that the two-screen experience is becoming more and more ubiquitous,” says Morse. “More people are interacting, watching while using their tablets and their iPhones, and we want to create the richest two-screen experience we can.”


CNN: Uniting TV, Mobile & Social


CNN will be monitoring Twitter commentary tagged with #CNNtv during the live broadcast, and display selected tweets in a “slow stream” alongside video coverage. Tweets and Facebook status updates from so-called “relevant influentials,” such as celebrities and friends of the Royal Family, will appear in the lower-third banner of the broadcast. Viewers are also encouraged to check in on GetGlue to unlock a series of Royal-Wedding themed stickers.

Most unusually, two-dimensional barcodes will appear on-screen throughout the day, prompting viewers with smartphones to scan the code to load additional CNN coverage on their smartphones.

In addition, CNN will be tweeting live updates from @royalweddingCNN, as well as from the accounts of individual presenters Anderson CooperPiers MorganRichard QuestKiran Chetry and Cat Deeley throughout the event.

AP Live, CBS News, ET TheInsider.com and the UK Press Association will all be hosting live broadcasts onLivestream, whilst the BBC will host its own livestream and live blog. Royal correspondent Peter Hunt will be taking questions on Twitter leading up to and on the big day.


Why Now & What’s Next?


We have seen heavy multimedia and cross-channel coverage during past global events, but never on this scale before.

The reason, Ghuneim says, is because many networks are beginning to understand the importance of an engaged audience across multiple channels, and have had the advantage of months of planning ahead of the broadcast.

The challenges involve understanding how consumers use different kinds of devices, and how to optimize the experience for each device.

For more information about how to follow the Royal Wedding online, please see our comprehensive guide.

Disclosure: CNN and ABC News are Mashable content partners.