The Role of Digital in TV Research, Fanship and Viewing – Think Insights – Google

The Role of Digital in TV Research, Fanship and Viewing – Think Insights – Google.

Digital platforms are changing the way people experience television. With 90% of TV viewers visiting YouTube and Google Search, we looked at how they are using these platforms to extend their experiences beyond their television sets. Here we detail the importance and growth of TV-related research online, the prevalence of fan engagement through video and the role of catch-up sources to extend the viewing time frame.

Digital platforms are changing the way today’s viewer experiences television. From sharing the new viral Jimmy Kimmel Live video to watching the promo for the premiere of The Walking Dead to searching for the actor who plays the funny cop on Brooklyn Nine-Nine, one thing is clear: There are more ways than ever for TV audiences to research, participate in and access television content.

With 90% of TV viewers visiting YouTube and Google Search, we looked at search activity, video views and engagement metrics to help us understand how viewers are using these platforms.1 Looking at a broad sample of 100 network and cable shows, we found that the corresponding online behavior is a clear indicator of a show’s popularity, as evidenced by a positive correlation between these activities and live plus three-day viewership. In this paper, we examine how viewers engage with and seek out these experiences on Google and YouTube, as well as the insights we can gain from their activities.

TV-related activity on Google and YouTube has grown year-over-year (YoY). Not only have searches across Google and YouTube grown, but there has also been a rise in video views, watch time and engagement on YouTube from 2012 to2013, suggesting that TV viewers are increasingly using these platforms to interact with fellow fans and engage with a show.

YoY Increase in TV-related Activities on Google and YouTube
Source: Google Internal Data, May–December 2012 to May–December 2013, United States.

While viewers continue to turn to multiple devices for television-related content, the query growth across Google and YouTube in the television category is driven by mobile and tablet, exceeding 100% on both of these devices.2

Online research: When, what and how

The changing face of television viewing has given way to new behaviors such as viral video sharing; audience-generated supplementary content; online streaming and use of catch-up sites such as Netflix, Hulu and networks’ streaming offerings. One thing remains consistent, though—a viewer’s desire to gain basic information about a show before tuning in.

Trailers, reviews, cast information and premiere dates are all common but essential types of content sought by viewers. Gathering this type of information is an important step in deciding whether or not to watch a show: Two-thirds of viewers of new television shows search online before tuning in.3 Overall, both Google and YouTube serve as key destinations in the television viewers’ decision-making process. Our analysis of Google and YouTube search queries and YouTube views show positive .72, .74 and .67 correlations with live plus three-day viewership, respectively.4

Let’s take a closer look at Google and YouTube search and viewing behaviors, specifically the whenwhat and how of seeking information and content:

When: We see that queries for fall television programs begin during upfronts and continue beyond the premiere, with increased activity during key show announcements and summer TV tentpoles such as Comic-Con and the Television Critics Association Press Tour (TCAs).

When TV Viewers Are Searching
*Different premiere dates affect when events are relative to premiere date for a majority of shows. Data represents average query volume for 100 fall TV shows.
Source: Google Internal Data, May–December 2013, United States.

Although this trend holds true for most shows, there are a few differences worth noting. New shows see spikes during upfront announcements, and then interest builds again about two months before the premiere date. Returning shows, in contrast, see sustained volume throughout the off-air period. Although new shows generally have fewer searches than returning shows, they have twice as many queries, on average, for promos, ratings and reviews. This suggests that users may be doing their homework prior to tuning in.

In addition, there are a few genre differences worth noting. From a trending standpoint, there is more activity earlier on for dramas and comedies. Queries for reality programs pick up in the few weeks leading up to premiere and are sustained post-premiere. In examining search intensity (queries/live plus three-day viewership), serialized dramas—especially teen dramas such as Vampire Diaries and Arrow—have the highest search intensity, followed by comedies and reality shows. Procedural dramas, in contrast, have the lowest search intensity.5

What: Outside of a show’s title, some of the most common TV-related search terms include season, TV show, network and cast modifiers, among others. Of these, we see that some are sustained throughout the premiere timeline, while others are concentrated to parts within it. For instance, promo queries spike at upfront week and tend to start building again about two months pre-premiere. Premiere-related queries are concentrated in the weeks leading up to and immediately following the premiere. Ratings and review queries, on the other hand, tend to be concentrated during premiere week and the weeks after it.

What TV Viewers Are Searching For…and When
Source: Google Search Internal Data, May–December 2013, United States.

One important component of what users are searching for is trailers for new shows. In addition to being frequently searched, the trailer is the most watched piece of content for new shows on YouTube, whereas videos viewed for returning shows are more varied in nature.6

“In addition to being frequently searched, the trailer is the most watched piece of content for new shows on YouTube.”

How: We examined 17 categories of Google Search queries across devices and discovered that intent can vary by device. For instance, cast, premiere/finale and plot-related searches regularly occur on mobile devices relative to other categories, suggesting that users often seek quick bits of information on a small screen. Alternatively, watch-related queries on Google Search are overwhelmingly searched on desktop and tablet devices, highlighting a preference among users to consume longer content on larger-screened devices.

How TV Viewers Are Searching
Source: Google Search Internal Data, June–December 2013, United States.

Viewer participation: Going beyond the episode

For a core group of fans, a 22- or 44-minute TV episode isn’t enough. Whether it’s seeking additional content offline (such as the live talk show Talking Deadthat discusses episodes of The Walking Dead) or online (network websites or industry sources such as imdb.com), TV lovers are looking to further engage with their favorite programs through “beyond-the-episode” content such as parodies, behind-the-scenes clips, and extended trailers found on YouTube. To better understand their online experience, we look to YouTube engagement metrics (i.e., shares, likes/dislikes, comments, subscribes), which collectively show a positive .58 correlation to live plus three-day viewership.7

A key behavior among YouTube users is the propensity to discuss their favorite shows and create new related content. Indeed, in 2013, for every piece of content uploaded by a show’s network on YouTube, there were more thanseven pieces of community-generated content related to the show. Some fan favorites far exceed that benchmark: Game of Thrones, for example, had 82 community-generated videos per video uploaded by the network and The Vampire Diaries had 69.8

These same fans are not only engaging with this content but also looking for ways to share and discuss it with a community of like-minded fans. An example of this collective enthusiasm can be found in YouTube’s subscriber community. Overall, they tend to watch 52% more video than those who don’t subscribe.9And because they watch more video overall, they’re often the first to discover content.

A popular late-night talk show’s highly viewed YouTube video that reached one million views in less than 18 hours exemplifies this phenomenon.10 We can see that subscribers comprise the majority of views right after the video goes live, but over time, discovery sources begin to shift as these initial viewers (the subscribers) share the video with others. As views from subscribers begin to taper off, direct links, YouTube searches and other user-controlled discovery methods take over. This highlights the importance of a strong subscriber base because subscribers are often the first to see and subsequently share content.

Viewership Pattern After Posting of Popular Video
Source: Google Internal Data, November 2013, United States.

It’s also a reflection of a larger trend on YouTube—overall, the platform has seen a 3x increase YoY in daily subscribers.11 Additionally, TV networks have been gaining subscribers for their official YouTube channels at a blistering rate, with an average per-channel subscribership increase of 69% from the beginning to the end of 2013.12

Accessing content: Extending the viewership timeline

In the past few years, we’ve seen a shift in measurement as metrics have evolved to capture longer viewing windows. This reflects not just a change in user behavior but recognition that there is considerable value in time-shifted viewing. With shows seeing a marked increase in viewership numbers across genres in the three days following a premiere and between seasons, tune-in is now happening across a much more extended timeline.

One significant trend is in-season catch-up behavior. DVRs, new streaming options and watch apps provide viewers with greater flexibility than ever to watch the content they want, when they want it. Search patterns also reveal a rising interest in this notion of “TV on my time.” Queries on paid streaming providers such as “Amazon Instant Video” or “Hulu Plus,” have increased 16% YoY, while watch app-related queries, such as “HBO GO” and “AMC mobile,” have increased 35% YoY.13

Catch-up behavior is not restricted to in-season activity. If given the opportunity to catch up on a show before a new season, 78% of viewers would be more likely to tune in to the upcoming season.14 Query trends also reflect this sentiment: in the pre-premiere time frame, watch-related queries have increased 50% YoY, signaling intent to catch up on previous episodes before a season premiere.15 So when do viewers start catching up? Of the 70% who said that they catch up on past seasons of returning shows, approximately half start more than two months in advance.16

Day of week can also play a role in catch-up activity. Because viewership patterns show greater preference for time-shifted viewing of dramas, we analyzed pre-season search patterns for a set of dramas and found that catch-up-related queries tend to spike on Sundays. This “lazy Sunday effect” suggests that Sundays may be the most popular day of the week to both stream and catch up on shows.

Pre-Premiere, Daily Query Trending for Hit Serialized Dramas Catch-up Related Queries
Source: Google Internal Data, May–August 2013, United States.

As networks and streaming providers create new ways for viewers to access programming outside the traditional viewing window, they’re creating the opportunity for new viewership as well. Understanding the patterns of how and when viewers are researching catch-up options is important in recognizing key moments of tune-in engagement.

Summary

Digital platforms have fundamentally changed the way TV viewers research, participate in and access their favorite shows. Search, video and engagement activities, which show a positive correlation to viewership, can provide additional insight into a show’s popularity. Here we summarize our key observations across Google and YouTube:

Research

  • We see online television activity growth in the YoY increase in TV-related queries on Google and YouTube, and a rise in watch time, engagement with, and views of TV-related videos on YouTube.
  • Across the board, viewers are starting their research well before a premiere, with activity continuing several weeks beyond the premiere.

Participation

  • TV audiences often look to go “beyond-the-episode” on YouTube.
  • YouTube’s subscribers are fans who actively engage with a show and other fans, and they’re often key in spreading the word.
  • YouTube users engage with their favorite shows through discussion and creation of new related content.

Access

  • Time shifting is here to stay, with catch-up behavior starting well before new seasons and continuing after episode premieres.
  • Sunday may be the most popular day of the week to both stream and catch up on shows.

Sources:
1 Nielsen, @Plan, Q4 2013.
2 Google internal data, May – December 2012 to May – December 2013, United States.
3 Google/Ipsos OTX, Pathways to TV Consumption Study, 2013.
4 Google Internal Data and Nielsen TV Toolbox, United States.
Analysis looks at relationship between non-premiere live plus three-day viewership and leading seven-day Google and YouTube queries and YouTube views for cable and network shows across drama, comedy and reality genres. Analysis excludes outliers such as teen-skewing shows, musical reality competitions and shows with several searchable non-TV entities. View metrics analyzed on a representative sample of 32 fall shows.
5 Google Internal Data and Nielsen TV Toolbox, September–December 2013, United States.
6 Google Internal Data, 2013, United States.
7 Google Internal Data and Nielsen TV Toolbox, United States.
Analysis looks at relationship between non-premiere live plus three-day viewership and leading seven-day engagement metrics (likes/dislikes, comments, shares and subscribes) for cable and network shows across drama, comedy and reality genres. Analysis excludes outliers such as teen-skewing shows, musical reality competitions and shows with several searchable non-TV entities. Engagement metrics analyzed on a representative sample of 32 fall shows.
8 Google Internal Data, 2013, United States.
9 Google Internal Data, January 2014, United States.
10 Google Internal Data, November 2013, United States.
11 Google Internal Data, October 17, 2013.
12 Google Internal Data, 2013, United States.
13 Google Internal Data, 2012–2013, United States.
14 Google, Google Consumer Survey, n=500, March 8, 2013.
15 Google Internal Data, T-12 week – premiere week, United States.
16 Google, Google Consumer Survey, n=500, February 6, 2014.

  • Andrea Chen

 

 

Social Media Winter is Coming.

Social Media Winter is coming! Alors que la saison 4 de Game of Thrones commence demain sur HBO, Hootsuite vient de mettre en ligne une vidéo qui revisite le générique de la série pour l’adapter à son domaine.

Ainsi, le service a décidé de remplacer les royaumes qui se font la guerre par les différents médias sociaux.Tout comme dans le générique de Game of Thrones, on voit les bâtiments apparaitre section par section et émerger de la carte alors qu’on les survole : « chacun des royaumes a des caractéristiques et des fonctionnalités uniques représentant bien le réseau social qu’elles représentent du Colisée YouTube pour Google au marché du travail pour Linkedin« . Hootsuite explique également que l’on pourrait trouver quelques surprises cachées dans la vidéo.

Une belle manière de faire la promotion du service qui permet de gérer ses différents comptes médias sociaux dans un même espace!

- See more at: http://www.geeksandcom.com/2014/04/05/quand-hootsuite-revisite-le-generique-de-game-of-thrones-facon-medias-sociaux/#sthash.gpZogwN3.dpuf

Les recettes publicitaires de YouTube explosent – Économie – Bilan

Les recettes publicitaires de YouTube explosent – Économie – Bilan.


PAR AFP
 Les recettes publicitaires de YouTube (Google) devraient atteindre 5,6 milliards de dollars en 2013, dont il gardera 1,96 milliard après les reversement à ses partenaires, en hausse de 65,5% sur 2012.
VIDÉO

Le site de vidéos est très confiant pour ses retombées publicitaires en 2013, selon une étude du cabinet eMarketer. Le groupe gardera 1,96 milliard après les reversements à ses partenaires.

YouTube encaisse ainsi 1,7% des recettes mondiales de publicité sur Internet, davantage que Twitter, Amazon ou Linkedin. Ses recettes nettes représentent 5,1% des revenus publicitaires nets totaux de Google, contre 3,6% en 2012.

YouTube réalise la majorité de ses recettes nettes aux Etats-Unis(1,08 milliard de dollars), dont 850 millions provenant des publicités en format vidéo. Le site de vidéos capte ainsi 20,5% du marché américain de la publicité vidéo en ligne.

100 heures de vidéo chaque minute

YouTube compte désormais plus d’un milliard de visiteurs unique par mois qui regardent plus de 6 milliards d’heures de vidéos par mois, en hausse de 50% sur 2012. De son côté, le blog officiel de la plate-forme (youtube-global.blogspot.com) précise que 80% des vues sont réalisées hors des Etats-Unis.

Selon eMarketer, cent heures de vidéo sont téléchargées sur le site chaque minute. Plus d’un millions d’annonceurs y ont recours. Un quart du temps d’audience est réalisé sur des appareils mobiles.

En 2014, YouTube verra ses recettes provenant des publicités vidéo aux Etats-Unis atteindre 1,22 milliard, soit 21,1% du marché américain. Une hausse liée à l’accroissement de la vidéo sur appareils mobiles, ainsi qu’à une politique volontariste du groupe, qui encourage les annonceurs à placer des prérolls (spots vidéo placés au début des vidéos) que l’internaute peut arrêter au bout de cinq secondes, un format bon marché pour l’annonceur et qui n’agace pas trop les internautes. A tel point que les prérolls, qui il y a deux ans encore étaient rares sur YouTube, y sont devenues la norme.

Video Is the Next Frontier for Social Advertisers – eMarketer

Video Is the Next Frontier for Social Advertisers – eMarketer.

Digital video viewing is mainstream, and eMarketer estimates that 182.5 million people [≈ population of Brazil, nation] in the US, or 75% of all internet users, will view digital videos this year, and video advertising spending will increase by more than 40% in 2013 as well.

Video viewership and social sharing are closely intertwined; for example, an April 2013 blinkx survey conducted by Harris Interactive found that more than 40% of social network users watch TV or online video and simultaneously discuss content with their friends&mdashthe percentage was even higher among respondents ages 18 to 34, 14% of whom said they “always/often” do so.

Despite the connection between social network users and video content, social video advertising is still nascent. According to “Demystified: Video Advertising on Social Networks,” an August 2013 study from Mixpo, 8.5% of agency executives said they were underperforming on social video advertising, and none of the respondents said they were experts in the medium, according to the report.

Advertisers’ admitted lack of sophistication doesn’t mean they aren’t testing and experimenting. According to the Mixpo report, nearly 70% of agency executives planned to advertise on YouTube in 2014, while nearly one-quarter expect to run video ads on Twitter and about one in seven on LinkedIn. Though video advertising as Mixpo defines it doesn’t yet exist on Facebook, Instagram or Vine, nearly half of respondents to the survey said they would work video ads into their Facebook marketing mix if given the opportunity.

For social network users, identifying paid advertising and owned content marketing is often a blurry line. Mixpo’s definition of video advertising excludes branded video posts on social sites, but it doesn’t denote whether it refers to sponsored video posts, which are likely to be the types of paid video ads that will first find their way into Facebook, Instagram and Vine, given the networks’ respective user interfaces (and opportunities in mobile). Notably, Unisphere Research found in an August 2013 survey that nearly 60% of marketers would like to increase their video content in social networks&mdashmore than any other content category.

Social network advertising is unique because it requires marketers to fit in context with content rather than standing out from what the user is viewing, as a television or digital video programming advertisement is designed to do. As a result, sponsored video content may in turn be the most suitable way for advertisers to integrate and ingratiate themselves within social network users’ information feeds.


Read more at http://www.emarketer.com/Article/Video-Next-Frontier-Social-Advertisers/1010382#BDfOIFG2Z44luV88.99

The Seven Success Factors of Social Business Strategy [INFOGRAPHIC] | Vala Afshar

The Seven Success Factors of Social Business Strategy [INFOGRAPHIC] | Vala Afshar.

Vala Afshar

2013-07-30-57797Infographic.jpg

Houston, we have a problem – a social business strategy problem.

The era of social networking started in the early 2000s with the launch of Friendster. In fact we can argue that there were renditions of social networking even before that –from Bulletin Board Systems (BBS) to CompuServe, Prodigy, and AOL. Yet even though we have had some form of social networking since the advent of the networked ecosystem, most companies today are still challenged with successful social business transformational initiatives.

A recent survey by Altimeter of nearly 700 social media professionals yielded that:

  • Only 34% of businesses feel that their social strategy is connected to business outcomes.
  • Just 28% of companies feel that they have a holistic approach to social media, where lines of business and business functions work together under a common vision.
  • A mere 12% are confident they have a plan that looks beyond the next year.
  • Only half said that top executives were “informed, engaged and aligned with their companies’ social strategy.”


As a CMO and an active user of social media, I am stumped at how the industry still treats social as an experiment. Majority of businesses using social media today have few clear connections between their social activities and business goals. Social media metrics, if they exist, focus instead on engagement activity metrics like ‘likes’ and ‘follows’ and not the actual business value creation like revenue, brand reputation or cost reduction.

Another trait commonly observed in the industry is that most social media strategists focus solely on the external social media. What is missing is a holistic strategy that incorporates both external and internal facets and focuses on translating business objectives into socially adept interactions.

Time is now to get serious about social and this is precisely what authors and technology analysts Charlene Li and Brian Solis have addressed in their latest publication, “The Seven Success Factors of Social Business Strategy“. The e-book focuses on factors that enable executives and strategists all across to develop and execute on a holistic social business strategy.

The e-book is an easy and insightful read that provides practical advice. You will learn how to define your social strategy, gain alignment across the business, and use said strategy to support business goals. Li and Solis also focus their findings and recommendations on how to convince and rally decision makers at the executive level, with both considered practices and mistakes to avoid.

Without further ado, here are the 7 key factors that impact the success of your social business strategy.

1) Define business goals

Figure out your business objectives. It is imperative that your strategy be built around your business goals. Starting off on the right foot means defining goals up front and ensuring that stakeholders at different levels and across departments are aligned towards those goals.

The second step is to define key performance indicators (KPIs) and metrics that go beyond engagement data sets. For example, take likes, comments, re-tweets, reach, views and the alike, and map these to tangible business outcomes such as revenue generation, brand reputation and cost savings.

Bonus points for teams that can start correlating sentiment and share of voice in social media against business impact on revenue, support and retention.


2) Establish a long-term vision

There is tremendous advantage in knowing where we are going. It’s not just enough to have goals in place; you also need to have a long term vision that communicates to everyone within the organization on why this journey is taking place and the value it brings.

It is imperative to define this vision for future employees, customers, and partner relationships and social experiences that will come about as a result of this holistic strategy. It provides a direction and a purpose to every stakeholder. In order to establish a vision,social executives must understand their role in a social business.


3) Ensure executive alignment and support

Executive support is imperative to the establishment and on-going execution of a social business strategy. Social often exists in its own marketing silo. But at some point, business collaboration must extend beyond marketing or social customer care and pervasively reach throughout the entire ecosystem. When every voice is heard in the seams of the organizational fabric, you have achieved a holistic adoption of social. Executive sponsorship is necessary to do this, and to also align collaboration with tangible business objectives.

Additionally, speaking the language that matters to executives is the only way to ensuring program support, therefore allowing sustainable budget and resources to scale social within the organization. I recently wrote about the importance of social executive support.


4) Define the strategy roadmap and associated initiatives

Once you have your vision and you are in alignment on your business goals, you need a detailed plan that outlines each step required to build your social business. Ideally, it should outline the next 3 years with focus on initiatives that one can execute in a proficient manner immediately, along with prioritization based on business value.


5) Establish governance and guidelines

Develop one coherent social governance model that outlines and defines stakeholders that are responsible for the strategy, management and development of an infrastructure to support your social business strategy.

Ideally, a corporate hub is established by the social media strategist with representation from each business unit to initiate enterprise priorities, guidelines and processes along with specific roles and responsibilities. One should also invest in formation of a Social Media Center of Excellence (CoE) which ensures a systematic strategy and allows sustainable scalability across the organization.


6) Secure staff, resources and funding

The most important aspect of a successful social business strategy is talent. It is important to get the right people with the right mindset onto the core team to make this work. Determine where resources are best applied in the present and the future. Ideally, your corporate strategist and their teams should have proficient background in dealing with emergent technologies and approaches.

Think deep about your strategic relationships across your agency, vendor and partner networks. It is recommended and perfectly fine to rely on capable external partners in the initial phases when marketing efforts are being amplified and internal skills are limited.

As a CMO, I am more interested in my talent’s ability to adapt and forecast the future working models than their ability to sell me their traditional past successes. Invest in the ability to train your staff on vision, purpose and business value creation along with an appropriate metrics/reporting structure to ensure a uniform approach across the business.


7) Invest in technology platforms that evolve

Avoid the shiny object syndrome that is often seen in marketing departments all across the industry. Avoid new technologies and investment in the latest tactics prior to having a coherent and a holistic social business strategy, roadmap and alignment in place. Often times, technology choices of yesteryear don’t scale well into the future state of a social business. Smart executives and strategists always pick technology last.


One way of tackling this issue is to align with technology vendors who share their product roadmaps with you so that one can easily evaluate if they will meet your organization’s future state.

Enterprise social is often misunderstood by the masses as an easy, simple, in the moment kind of an activity. Fortunately for us, Solis and Li have done a great job in explaining the intricacies of enterprise social business and provide a heartfelt read on tackling the issues that we are all facing in this industry.

In the noisy world of social media publications, this is a refreshing and an informative read. I highly recommend that all business executives, especially CEOs, CMOs, CHROs, CCOs, and CIOs to consider reading “The Seven Success Factors of Social Business Strategy“.

84% des consommateurs de biens culturels dématérialisés pratiquent le streaming et 49% le téléchargement (étude OpinionWay pour l’Hadopi) – Offremedia

84% des consommateurs de biens culturels dématérialisés pratiquent le streaming et 49% le téléchargement (étude OpinionWay pour l’Hadopi) – Offremedia.

84% DES CONSOMMATEURS DE BIENS CULTURELS DÉMATÉRIALISÉS PRATIQUENT LE STREAMING ET 49% LE TÉLÉCHARGEMENT (ÉTUDE OPINIONWAY POUR L’HADOPI)

Le 01/07/2013

nle11-images-opinionway

OpinionWay a suivi, pendant une semaine, à la fin du mois de mars 2013, les pratiques de téléchargement et de streaming des consommateurs de biens culturels dématérialisés : musique, films, séries, jeux vidéo et livres/BD.
84% des consommateurs sondés pratiquent le streaming et 49% le téléchargement. Le streaming est nettement plébiscité pour la musique (66% vs 28% pour le téléchargement) et les séries TV (46% vs 18%). L’écart est moins marqué pour les films (30% vs 20%) et pour les livres/BD (12% vs 10%).
Globalement, 71% des séries TV et 69% des films téléchargés le sont illégalement. En revanche, seule 25% de la musique téléchargée est illégale, ainsi que 25% des livres et 19% des jeux vidéo. Dans le cadre du streaming, la proportion d’illégalité est plus faible pour les films (38%), les séries TV (37%) et la musique (5%), plus élevée pour les livres (27%).
53% des sondés ont déjà payé pour accéder à une oeuvre dématérialisée qu’il s’agisse d’un abonnement ou d’un achat à l’unité. 42% des répondants déclarent avoir déjà payé à l’unité. Ce sont plutôt des CSP+ (51%), des 25-39 ans (48%) ou des 40-59 ans (47%), et des hommes (47%). 25% des répondants déclarent disposer d’un abonnement à une plateforme de biens culturels en ligne (Canalplay, Deezer, Spotify…) avec une légère sur-représentation chez les 18-39 ans (28%), les hommes (27%) et les CSP+ (27%). 47% des consommateurs n’ont jamais payé pour accéder à une œuvre. 32% d’entre eux sont prêts à le faire, avec une nette préférence pour un paiement à l’acte (66% vs 11% pour un abonnement mensuel et 23% qui ne savent pas).

NL748-image-opinionway

YouTube est le site le plus consulté pour la musique – en streaming (54%) ou en téléchargement (25%) – et pour les films en streaming (18% des répondants). Pour les films en téléchargement, Torrent 411 (7%) et Allostreaming (6%) devancent Canal+/Canalplay (5%).
Pour les séries TV, les sites des chaînes sont devancés par Dpstream.net (14%) en streaming et par Uptobox.com, Cpasbien.com, Torrent 411 et Thepiratebay.se en téléchargement.
Cette étude a été réalisée par OpinionWay pour l’Hadopi entre le 26 mars et le 3 avril. 4740 consommateurs de biens culturels dématérialisés ont répondu durant 7 jours consécutifs à des questionnaires en ligne : chaque participant devait noter sa consommation journalière dématérialisée de musique, films, séries, jeux vidéo, et livres/BD. Les internautes répondants consomment au moins une fois par an en streaming ou en téléchargement l’un de ces produits.

Why Advertisers Need YouTube [INFORGRAPHIC]

Why Advertisers Need YouTube [INFORGRAPHIC].

Youtube-video-marketing

YouTube reaches more U.S. adults between the ages of 18 and 34 than any cable network. With one billion unique users per month, YouTube helps brands engage with people who aren’t just willing to watch videos; they’re actively seeking them out.

video marketing strategy on YouTube can benefit your brand’s social media presence on other networks, too. When Old Spice ran its “The Man Your Man Could Smell Like” campaign, it gained over 80,000 Twitter followers in two days and increased its Facebook engagement by 800%. What do these numbers mean? Well, for Old Spice, they meant a 107% sales increase.

This infographic by MDG Advertising illustrates the growth and consumption habits of YouTube viewers, and shows how your brand can turn content into revenue with a video marketing strategy.

What’s the best YouTube video marketing campaign you’ve seen? Let us know in the comments section below.

Homepage image via iStockPhotodem10