Uniqlo Sydney: Wearable technology UMood unveiled


WHY choose your clothes yourself when you could get a machine to do it for you?

Source: Uniqlo Sydney: Wearable technology UMood unveiled

That’s the idea behind wearable technology unveiled at Japanese retailer Uniqlo this week.

Customers at four of the chain’s Sydney stores can try out a headset that will match their mood to the ideal T-shirt.

The UMood measures a person’s brainwaves while they are being shown a series of still images and video on a large screen.

The UMood matches your mood to a T-shirt.

The UMood matches your mood to a T-shirt.Source:News Corp Australia

Their neurological reactions provide a brainwave reading, which Uniqlo scores against an algorithm that suggests a T-shirt from its range.

University of Melbourne neuroscientist Dr Phil Harris has worked with Uniqlo to launch the technology and said there was a growing trend for brands to turn to neuroscience to give them an edge with consumers.

Here, the device reads Courtney’s brain data.

Here, the device reads Courtney’s brain data.Source:News Corp Australia

He said neuroscience had infiltrated the way advertisements were put together and it was a only a matter of time before it became part of the in-store retail experience.

“Consumers want lots of choice but when we give them lots of choice, people actually have trouble making decisions,” Dr Harris said.

The UMood gives Courtney several options to choose from.

The UMood gives Courtney several options to choose from.Source:News Corp Australia

“So I see a tool that helps narrow the range of options for someone as really beneficial.” Senior editor of technology website Cnet, Nic Healey, tried out the UMood and was a tad cynical.

“Do you ever buy clothing based on your mood, like what you’re feeling exactly at that moment?” he said.

“I thought it was interesting, because while I think it got my mood right, none of the designs it showed were anything I would actually wear.”

That’s the idea behind wearable technology unveiled at Japanese retailer Uniqlo this week.

Customers at four of the chain’s Sydney stores can try out a headset that will match their mood to the ideal T-shirt.

The UMood measures a person’s brainwaves while they are being shown a series of still images and video on a large screen.

The UMood matches your mood to a T-shirt.

The UMood matches your mood to a T-shirt.Source:News Corp Australia

Their neurological reactions provide a brainwave reading, which Uniqlo scores against an algorithm that suggests a T-shirt from its range.

University of Melbourne neuroscientist Dr Phil Harris has worked with Uniqlo to launch the technology and said there was a growing trend for brands to turn to neuroscience to give them an edge with consumers.

Here, the device reads Courtney’s brain data.

Here, the device reads Courtney’s brain data.Source:News Corp Australia

He said neuroscience had infiltrated the way advertisements were put together and it was a only a matter of time before it became part of the in-store retail experience.

“Consumers want lots of choice but when we give them lots of choice, people actually have trouble making decisions,” Dr Harris said.

The UMood gives Courtney several options to choose from.

The UMood gives Courtney several options to choose from.Source:News Corp Australia

“So I see a tool that helps narrow the range of options for someone as really beneficial.” Senior editor of technology website Cnet, Nic Healey, tried out the UMood and was a tad cynical.

“Do you ever buy clothing based on your mood, like what you’re feeling exactly at that moment?” he said.

“I thought it was interesting, because while I think it got my mood right, none of the designs it showed were anything I would actually wear.”

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