Gartner’s 2015 Hype Cycle for Emerging Technologies: Autonomous Cars In, Big Data Out In Gartner Hype Cycle

Gartner’s 2015 Hype Cycle for Emerging Technologies Identifies the Computing Innovations That Organizations Should Monitor.

2015 Hype Cycle Special Report Illustrates the Market Excitement, Maturity and Benefit of More Than 2,000 Technologies

The journey to digital business continues as the key theme of Gartner, Inc.’s “Hype Cycle for Emerging Technologies, 2015.” New to the Hype Cycle this year is the emergence of technologies that support what Gartner defines as digital humanism — the notion that people are the central focus in the manifestation ofdigital businesses and digital workplaces.

The Hype Cycle for Emerging Technologies report is the longest-running annual Hype Cycle, providing a cross-industry perspective on the technologies and trends that business strategists, chief innovation officers, R&D leaders, entrepreneurs, global market developers and emerging-technology teams should consider in developing emerging-technology portfolios.

“The Hype Cycle for Emerging Technologies is the broadest aggregate Gartner Hype Cycle, featuring technologies that are the focus of attention because of particularly high levels of interest, and those that Gartner believes have the potential for significant impact,” said Betsy Burton, vice president and distinguished analyst at Gartner. “This year, we encourage CIOs and other IT leaders to dedicate time and energy focused on innovation, rather than just incremental business advancement, while also gaining inspiration by scanning beyond the bounds of their industry.”

Major changes in the 2015 Hype Cycle for Emerging Technologies (see Figure 1) include the placement ofautonomous vehicles, which have shifted from pre-peak to peak of the Hype Cycle. While autonomous vehicles are still embryonic, this movement still represents a significant advancement, with all major automotive companies putting autonomous vehicles on their near-term roadmaps. Similarly, the growing momentum (from post-trigger to pre-peak) in connected-home solutions has introduced entirely new solutions and platforms enabled by new technology providers and existing manufacturers.

Figure 1. Hype Cycle for Emerging Technologies, 2015

Source: Gartner (August 2015)

“As enterprises continue the journey to becoming digital businesses, identifying and employing the right technologies at the right time will be critical,” said Ms. Burton. “As we have set out on the Gartner roadmap to digital business, there are six progressive business era models that enterprises can identify with today and to which they can aspire in the future. However, since the Hype Cycle for Emerging Technologies is purposely focused on more emerging technologies, it mostly supports the last three of these stages: Digital Marketing, Digital Business and Autonomous.”

Digital Marketing (Stage 4): The digital marketing stage sees the emergence of the Nexus of Forces (mobile, social, cloud and information). Enterprises in this stage focus on new and more sophisticated ways to reach consumers, who are more willing to participate in marketing efforts to gain greater social connection, or product and service value. Enterprises that are seeking to reach this stage should consider the following technologies on the Hype Cycle: Gesture Control, Hybrid Cloud Computing, Internet of Things (IoT), Machine Learning, People-Literate Technology, Speech-to-Speech Translation. 

Digital Business (Stage 5): Digital business is the first post-nexus stage on the roadmap and focuses on the convergence of people, business and things. The IoT and the concept of blurring the physical and virtual worlds are strong concepts in this stage. Physical assets become digitalized and become equal actors in the business value chain alongside already-digital entities, such as systems and apps. Enterprises seeking to go past the Nexus of Forces technologies to become a digital business should look to these additional technologies: 3D Bioprinting for Life Science R&D, 3D Bioprinting Systems for Organ Transplant, Human Augmentation, Affective Computing, Augmented Reality, Bioacoustics Sensing, Biochips, Brain-Computer Interface, Citizen Data Science, Connected Home, Cryptocurrencies, Cryptocurrency Exchange, Digital Dexterity, Digital Security, Enterprise 3D Printing, Smart Robots, Smart Advisors, Gesture Control, IoT, IoT Platform, Machine Learning, Micro Data Centers, Natural-Language Question Answering, Neurobusiness, People-Literate Technology, Quantum Computing, Software-Defined Security, Speech-to-Speech Translation, Virtual Reality, Volumetric and Holographic Displays, and Wearables. 

Autonomous (Stage 6): Autonomous represents the final post-nexus stage. This stage is defined by an enterprise’s ability to leverage technologies that provide humanlike or human-replacing capabilities. Using autonomous vehicles to move people or products and using cognitive systems to recommend a potential structure for an answer to an email, write texts or answer customer questions are all examples that mark the autonomous stage. Enterprises seeking to reach this stage to gain competitiveness should consider these technologies on the Hype Cycle: Autonomous Vehicles, Bioacoustic Sensing, Biochips, Brain-Computer Interface, Digital Dexterity, Human Augmentation, Machine Learning, Neurobusiness, People-Literate Technology, Quantum Computing, Smart Advisors, Smart Dust, Smart Robots, Virtual Personal Assistants, Virtual Reality, and Volumetric and Holographic Displays. 

“Although we have categorized each of the technologies on the Hype Cycle into one of the digital business stages, enterprises should not limit themselves to these technology groupings,” said Ms. Burton. “Many early adopters have embraced quite advanced technologies, for example, autonomous vehicles or smart advisors, while they continue to improve nexus-related areas, such as mobile apps.”

#Infographie : Les applis mobiles, premier investissement des entreprises en marketing digital – Maddyness

#Infographie : Les applis mobiles, premier investissement des entreprises en marketing digital – Maddyness.

La dernière étude réalisée par Val­tech et Adobe auprès de plus de 300 directeurs et responsables marketing dresse un état des lieux des logiques d’investissements et des grands enjeux du marketing digital en 2015. Retour sur l’infographie qui dessine les tendances digitales de ces derniers mois.


Depuis quatre ans, Valtech et Adobe cherchent à retranscrire les préoccupations et les attentes des directions marketing, tout en identifiant les postes d’investissement des prochains mois dans un baromètre du marketing digital. Autant d’informations nécessaires pour dresser le panorama d’un écosystème qui évolue rapidement.

L’enquête, menée auprès plus de 300 directeurs et responsables marketing d’entreprises de toutes tailles confirme une tendance forte : les applications mobiles constituent le premier poste d’investissement devant l’e-commerce, le brand et content management, le social media et le data marketing. Autre information : la part du marketing digital gagne 3% entre 2014 et 2015 dans le budget marketing global.

Côté indicateurs, les clics semblent (pour 181 d’entre eux) importer plus que le nombre de visites (169) ou encore la conversion (155). Les initiatives mobiles mises en place concernent pour 41 des répondants le responsive design, les applications mobiles (32) et les sites mobile (27). Quant au parcours cross canal, il sera principalement optimisé grâce à des e-mailings performants et à des sms qualitatifs, principaux leviers d’acquisition, devant la publicité et le SEO.

Qui tient les rênes de l’investissement en marketing digital ? Le marketing se hisse à la première place du classement (50%) devant le digital (35%) et l’IT (15%).  La data récoltée est quant à elle majoritairement utilisée pour améliorer la connaissance client, pour mieux cibler et segmenter son audience et enfin pour mieux personnaliser ses communications.

« Ce baromètre confirme nos observations sur le terrain : la complexification croissante du digital s’accompagne d’une volonté de plus en plus importante de la part des marques de mieux le comprendre et de l’intégrer à leur stratégie globale. L’augmentation du ROI des stratégies digitales, et notamment des stratégies mobiles, nous renseigne quant à l’évolution des budgets marketing globaux en faveur du digital », développe Christophe Marée, Directeur Marketing Digital chez Adobe.

barometre marketing digital

Les résultats complets de cette étude sont disponibles sur le site de Valtech

4 advices (from GEM) to prepare Gen Y students to lead tomorrow’s digital world (HR Magazine)

HR Magazine – Preparing Gen Y students to lead tomorrow’s digital world.

Many employers assume Generation Y students have an innate digital know-how and leave university ready to apply these skills at work. But just because they are young, connected and have grown up with technology doesn’t mean millennials are prepared as future digital leaders.

Where does the skills gap lie? 

Many students we’ve worked with don’t have a clear definition of ‘digital’; they think it refers to physical devices. When we asked a group to list digital brands they cited two services – Facebook and Twitter. They quoted mostly tangible products such as smartphones.

They often don’t understand the economic models of the digital economy and the societal implications. The growth of new players such as Uber and Airbnb is usually seen positively by millennials, without a clear understanding of their impact on traditional industries.

Many students assume future jobs are in start-ups or large tech companies, rather than traditional businesses that need digital transformation – banks and insurance, retailers, public transport or public services.

The role of business schools 

Business schools must help students better understand these aspects if we want them to be tomorrow’s ‘digital transformers’. Here are four tips for training Gen Y to lead in a digital world:

1. Build students’ knowledge of the digital economy

Business schools need to show students that the digital economy is made up of both specific players ‘born with the web’ and traditional companies that must transform their business models and customer relationships practices.

Take Uber, for example, which is creating new services that better serve our individual needs but in doing has generated new competition for taxi drivers. Younger generations must understand how traditional businesses can compete and adapt.

HR Magazine - Preparing Gen Y students to lead tomorrow’s digital world

At GEM (Grenoble Ecole de Management) we organise an annual meeting – the Digital Day – to share explanations with our students about the digital economy, job opportunities and how digital transformation works.

2. Raise awareness of job opportunities

This is all about transformation: students must understand how digital technologies have and will impact traditional jobs. A future HR manager will need to participate in the development of new digital services for people management, training and working.

Helping students understand digital transformation and the types of jobs required is crucial.

3. Exploit their digital skills

Business schools need to engage their students in co-producing digital content and tools. This could be something as simple as getting them to create a blog, to developing serious games or massive online open courses (MOOCs) that respond to a company’s needs.

I used an interactive approach to create my blog with my Masters students. Having given them specifications and deadlines, the students handled all aspects of social media, web design, copywriting and video interviews for the website.

This type of project fulfils the students’ appetite for digital work and their search for recognition (each student bylined the articles or received credit for the videos they created).

4. Help students analyse their digital habits

Younger generations struggle to analyse their digital habits. At GEM we run workshops to help students understand the impact of their digital behaviour and measure the extent to which they are connected.

We must help future generations disengage from their hyper-connected lifestyles and develop better time management skills. By asking students to analyse their digital habits, business schools can help them use these channels to their best advantage so that they become active digital leaders in tomorrow’s world, rather than simply consumers.

Benoît Meyronin is associate dean (business development & transformation) at Grenoble Ecole de Management (GEM)

– See more at: http://www.hrmagazine.co.uk/hro/features/1152445/preparing-gen-y-students-to-lead-tomorrow-s-digital-world#sthash.9o8jSPWi.dpuf

HR Magazine - Preparing Gen Y students to lead tomorrow’s digital world