Guillaume Bacuvier, managing director EMEA Solutions & Innovation at Google: “We don’t go online any more, we live online

Guillaume Bacuvier, managing director EMEA Solutions & Innovation at Google, said “We don’t go online any more, we live online”. And even if the basic aim of marketing has not changed over the years – i.e. to win over more customers and in- crease sales in the face of greater competition – two major elements have turned the landscape upside down. On the one hand, there is the emergence of mobile devices.

ec6c6_guillaumebacuvier_think2015_sm

“The average person consults his smartphone about 150 times a day and it is important to be able to identify these times so as to make use of them for marketing purposes.” And thanks to the many Google tools that reach over a billion people a month (including Chrome, Gmail, YouTube, etc.), marketing managers can target and reach eligible customers, impact on the purchasing process and measure the results of their marketing campaigns.

For instance, Google offers smart targeting and prospect/customer segmentation tools, as well as others that can detect intent to buy signs. Similarly, Google has solutions to optimise and personnalise marketing messages based on advanced algorithms, artificial intelligence and machine learning. To illustrate this, Bacuvier held up the example of the German e-commerce website Zalando, where 40% of the traffic comes from mobile devices, or the French Galeries Lafayette, where they have noticed that 20% of purchases are preceded by an online visit, and 20% of these visits are made via a mobile device!

 

Think with Google took place in February 2016 at Googleplex Brussels

Advertisements

#Infographie : Les applis mobiles, premier investissement des entreprises en marketing digital – Maddyness

#Infographie : Les applis mobiles, premier investissement des entreprises en marketing digital – Maddyness.

La dernière étude réalisée par Val­tech et Adobe auprès de plus de 300 directeurs et responsables marketing dresse un état des lieux des logiques d’investissements et des grands enjeux du marketing digital en 2015. Retour sur l’infographie qui dessine les tendances digitales de ces derniers mois.


Depuis quatre ans, Valtech et Adobe cherchent à retranscrire les préoccupations et les attentes des directions marketing, tout en identifiant les postes d’investissement des prochains mois dans un baromètre du marketing digital. Autant d’informations nécessaires pour dresser le panorama d’un écosystème qui évolue rapidement.

L’enquête, menée auprès plus de 300 directeurs et responsables marketing d’entreprises de toutes tailles confirme une tendance forte : les applications mobiles constituent le premier poste d’investissement devant l’e-commerce, le brand et content management, le social media et le data marketing. Autre information : la part du marketing digital gagne 3% entre 2014 et 2015 dans le budget marketing global.

Côté indicateurs, les clics semblent (pour 181 d’entre eux) importer plus que le nombre de visites (169) ou encore la conversion (155). Les initiatives mobiles mises en place concernent pour 41 des répondants le responsive design, les applications mobiles (32) et les sites mobile (27). Quant au parcours cross canal, il sera principalement optimisé grâce à des e-mailings performants et à des sms qualitatifs, principaux leviers d’acquisition, devant la publicité et le SEO.

Qui tient les rênes de l’investissement en marketing digital ? Le marketing se hisse à la première place du classement (50%) devant le digital (35%) et l’IT (15%).  La data récoltée est quant à elle majoritairement utilisée pour améliorer la connaissance client, pour mieux cibler et segmenter son audience et enfin pour mieux personnaliser ses communications.

« Ce baromètre confirme nos observations sur le terrain : la complexification croissante du digital s’accompagne d’une volonté de plus en plus importante de la part des marques de mieux le comprendre et de l’intégrer à leur stratégie globale. L’augmentation du ROI des stratégies digitales, et notamment des stratégies mobiles, nous renseigne quant à l’évolution des budgets marketing globaux en faveur du digital », développe Christophe Marée, Directeur Marketing Digital chez Adobe.

barometre marketing digital

Les résultats complets de cette étude sont disponibles sur le site de Valtech

The Marshall smartphone is a cynical branding exercise done right | The Verge

The Marshall smartphone is a cynical branding exercise done right | The Verge.

In an ideal world, brands would always make our lives easier. They would ensconce us in a safe environment where each new product bearing a storied name maintains the quality and care that have made that name famous. But in the real world, we have Apple making both the iPhone and the EarPods, Adobe responsible for both Photoshop and Flash, and Leica putting its iconic red dot on rebadged Panasonic cameras. Brands are unreliable.

Marshall is precisely the sort of turncoat brand that we should all be wary of. Having established itself as an icon of live rock music with its unique guitar amplifiers, the company recently decided to make some extra cash on the side by selling its name to a small Swedish outfit by the name of Zound Industries. All of a sudden, Marshall headphones and Bluetooth speakers started showing up, accompanied by the tattooed arms of their supposed rock legend users. It was cheap and exploitative, and at first it was just a terrible charade for awful products. The first set of Marshall-branded in-ear headphones was an unqualified disaster, both in its sound and design.

 

WHAT ANDROID NEEDS TODAY IS MORE PERSONALITY, NOT MORE PERFORMANCE

But somewhere along this road to perdition, a detour was taken and the Marshall-Zound hookup headed toward redemption. The latest Marshall Mode earbuds are a terrific improvement on their predecessors and finally sound like something worthy of bearing the big M logo that adorns them. And this week we got the next stage in the evolution of Marshall as a brand for non-Marshall products: a smartphone called the London. It should have been a dead-on-arrival calamity — another big name to add to the sad tales of the rebadged Polaroid and Kodak phones — but it’s subverted all prejudices and wowed us with a highly individualized and attractive design.

What sets the Marshall London apart from the rest of the gimmicky crowd is that it’s functionally, not just aesthetically, different. Its basic specs are unimpressive, but it has two headphone jacks for output and dual stereo microphones for recording. It has a professional Wolfson Audio sound card, a scroll wheel for a volume control, an “M” button for direct access to music, and yes, it even bundles in a pair of Marshall Modes. It’s a music aficionado’s phone that’s designed for that purpose. The fact it’s also embellished with brass accents and knurled sides that imitate Marshall’s amps is just a bonus.

 

Zound has been talking up its smartphone plans for a few months ahead of this week’s announcement, noting how boring and staid things have become and seeing an opportunity to add “soft values” with its own designs. That’s the notion of addressing the unquantified needs and wishes of users: a phone that attracts attention without being kitsch, a device that does something materially, if not massively, different. Zound has sidestepped the endless spec race and created a lightning rod for attention simply by tapping into our imaginations and unexpressed desires.

In spite of its mediocre specifications, the Marshall London has revitalized excitement around smartphones by being so clear-eyed and assertive in its purpose. Everyone canjust look at it and understand why it exists. That cannot be validly said of the marginal upgrades introduced by the likes of HTC, LG, Sony, and Huawei this year. It’s true that those big global brands have to cater to a broader market and therefore aim for a lower common denominator, but that doesn’t mean they can’t also show a bit of leadership by experimenting with wilder and more fascinating designs such as the London’s. Their passivity is what’s opening the door for Zound to steal the limelight.

THIS PHONE HAS SOUL AND STYLE, BUT QUESTIONS ABOUT ITS SUBSTANCE REMAIN UNANSWERED

And yet, the London still represents a Faustian deal. Sure, you get the pleasure of having the “turn it up to 11” marque on your phone, but you get none of the audio expertise of the actual Marshall company. Maybe Zound and its partners have enough engineering acumen to make that unimportant, but then they also lack the infrastructure required to support a smartphone beyond the first few days after it’s sold. What happens when Google releases Android M and the London needs to be updated across multiple countries and multiple carriers? The handset has a removable battery, but who’s in charge of making sure there will be replacements available in a couple of years’ time? Those are the unappreciated benefits of going with an established smartphone brand.

Ultimately, this smartphone feels like one giant contradiction. It’s disingenuous to just slap on the Marshall label when that company isn’t involved in the engineering, and yet the London is far from some corporate copycat cash-in. Its design is thoughtful and understated, and its hardware additions are purposeful. It marries cynical marketing with sincere design. More than anything, though, it reminds us that smartphones can and should be exciting — it just takes a little bit more imagination and courage than everyone else is showing right now.

Ubisoft voit ses ventes sur mobile décoller au premier trimestre | FrenchWeb.fr

Ubisoft voit ses ventes sur mobile décoller au premier trimestre | FrenchWeb.fr.

Les jeux pour terminaux mobiles commencent à représenter une part non négligeable des revenus d’Ubisoft. La firme a publié un chiffre d’affaires de 96,6 millions d’euros sur le premier trimestre de l’année fiscale 2015-2016, clos le 30 juin dernier. Il était de 809,7 millions d’euros au troisième trimestre de son exercice fiscal précédent. Un ralentissement anticipé par l’éditeur, qui prévoyait un chiffre d’affaires de 80 millions d’euros ce trimestre.

Certes, la Playstation 4 et les jeux  pour PC restent les deux principales sources de revenus de l’éditeur. Elles représentent respectivement 27% et 23% des recettes de la société d’origine bretonne. Toutefois, les ventes de jeux pour mobile et de produits dérivés ont fortement augmenté en un an. Elles représentent 14% du chiffre d’affaires de l’entreprise sur le premier trimestre de l’année fiscale en cours, contre seulement 1% un an plus tôt. Ces jeux pour mobiles et produits dérivés représentent une part plus importante de revenus générés que la Playstation 3 (11%), la Xbox 360 (11%), la Xbox One (11%) ou encore les Wii (3%).

Rayman Adventures sur mobile prévu pour l’automne

La firme a déjà sorti deux épisodes de Rayman adaptés aux smartphones et aux tablettes. Elle en prévoit d’en sortir un troisième cet automne, Rayman Adventures, développé par le studio Ubisoft de Montpellier. Ce jeu fonctionnera sous iOS et Android.

Ubisoft voit ses ventes sur mobile décoller au premier trimestre | FrenchWeb.fr

Ubisoft a mis l’accent sur les jeux pour mobiles depuis 2012. La société a décliné Assassin’s Creed et Prince of Persia par exemple. Auparavant l’éditeur avait laissé à la société Gameloft, dirigée par l’un des frères du pDG d’Ubisoft Yves Guillemot, le soin de développer ses jeux pour ce type de terminaux. Le modèle économique freemium est le plus courant, bien que de nouveaux modèle économiques soient testés. Au final, le segment digital représente 54,1 millions d’euros, soit 56% du chiffre d’affaires sur le premier trimestre 2015-2016, contre 23,2% l’année dernière.

Les jeux Ubisoft sont distribués dans 55 pays à travers le monde et la firme dispose de filiales dans 28 pays. Elle emploie environ 8 400 personnes. Son siège est situé à Montreuil en banlieue parisienne. Elle prévoit un chiffre d’affaires d’environ 90 millions d’euros au deuxième trimestre de l’année fiscale 2015-2016. Pour l’exercice annuel, Ubisoft prévoit un résultat opérationnel d’au moins 200 millions d’euros.


En savoir plus sur http://frenchweb.fr/ubisoft-voit-ses-ventes-sur-mobile-decoller-au-premier-trimestre/202126#xe6ZslMbWq4wQo5H.99

10ème Baromètre du Marketing Mobile : Wearables = 1,5 millions d’unités prévues (soit près de 4 fois plus qu’en 2014)

La Mobile Marketing Association France publie la neuvième édition du Baromètre trimestriel du Marketing Mobile, en partenariat avec comScore, GfK, Médiamétrie. 

Cette nouvelle édition du Baromètre Trimestriel de la Mobile Marketing Association France s’enrichit de nombreux nouveaux indicateurs et met en évidence l’importance du Mobile sous un jour nouveau : 

Pour la seule année 2015, plus de 25 millions de Smartphones et Tablettes vont être vendus en France : un record de ventes absolu pour le Mobile, 
Avec près de 1,5 millions d’unités prévues (soit près de 4 fois plus qu’en 2014) les wearables (accessoires portables intelligents) font une entrée remarquée sur le marché du Mobile, 
Les 20 applications les plus utilisées dépassent toutes désormais les 4,5 millions d’utilisateurs uniques et poussent le Mobile vers le statut de premier média digital et bientôt toutes catégories, 
Le Mobile joue un rôle de plus en plus important dans les expériences d’achat, avec, par exemple, 8 millions de Français qui prennent des photos de produit en magasin ! 

« 2015 se révèle être une année à la fois de prise de pouvoir et de renouveau pour le mobile : montée en puissance de tous les indicateurs de ventes, de pénétration et de monétisation, renouveau car de nouveaux supports (wearables…) et de nouveaux usages (Commerce Mobile) viennent créer de toutes nouvelles opportunités pour les marques » précise Philippe Dumont, Rapporteur de la Commission Application et Site Mobile de la Mobile Marketing Association France. 

Le Baromètre du Marketing Mobile, élaboré en collaboration avec les instituts comScore, GfK et Médiamétrie, est mis à jour trimestriellement et est composé d’une trentaine d’indicateurs clés. 

Le Baromètre du Marketing Mobile a pour objectif de décrypter de manière indépendante les usages et de quantifier l’importance du mobile pour des dizaines de millions de Français. Il présente notamment les dynamiques clés du marché, le profil des Français qui utilisent régulièrement leur Smartphone et leur Tablette et permet ainsi aux entreprises de mieux évaluer les opportunités de développer leur présence sur ce média. 

Le Baromètre du Marketing Mobile est disponible gratuitement sur le site de la Mobile Marketing Association France www.mmaf.fr sous forme d’infographie dans la rubrique « Actualités MMA France ». Il est possible de s’abonner au Baromètre du Marketing Mobile complet dans la rubrique « Publications » ou directement depuis le lien raccourci : http://nq.st/mmaf 

Le temps passé sur mobile dépasse celui sur PC au Royaume-Uni – JDN

Le temps passé sur mobile dépasse celui sur PC au Royaume-Uni – JDN.

En 2011, un adulte britannique passait 31 minutes par jour en moyenne sur les devices mobiles (smartphone, tablette…). En 2015, il y consacrera 2 heures et 26 minutes par jour, soit 5 fois plus qu’en 2011, selon les estimations de budget temps média au UK publiées par eMarketer. Pour la première année, le temps passé sur mobile dépassera le temps passé en ligne via les ordinateurs (2h13min) qui continue de progresser légèrement (+3 minutes/an).
Le temps passé sur smartphone devrait encore gagner +17 minutes cette année et dépasser le temps dévolu au média radio (1h31min vs 1h23min). Le temps passé sur tablette a, quant à lui, dépassé en 2014 le temps consacré à la presse (37min vs 20min) et devrait atteindre 48min en 2015. La télévision devrait rester le premier média consommé, avec un temps passé quotidien de 3h12min, en recul de 2 minutes vs 2014.

emarketer
Temps passé par média © eMarketer

En additionnant le temps passé par média, sans dédupliquer les phénomènes de multi-tasking, un Britannique aura, en 4 ans, consacré deux heures de plus aux médias majeurs : 9h34min en 2015 vs 7h38min en 2011.
Le cumul des médias digitaux représente désormais près de la moitié du budget temps média : 48,6% en 2015, contre moins d’un tiers en 2011 (31,7%).

 

emarketer2
Temps passé par média par jour © eMarketer

Three-fourths of the world’s mobile data traffic will be video by 2019

11 massive predictions about the future of mobile and mobile data | memeburn.

At this stage, telling anyone that we live in a mobile world seems more or less pointless. Our phones are hardwired into our daily lives and, for many of us, can seem more like artificial limbs than everyday devices. They’ve changed the world too. Web designers now think about how you’ll experience a site on a phone or tablet before they think about how you’ll see it on a desktop.

Apps meanwhile have gone from single function curiosities to powerful tools that allow us to do everything from hailing private cars to making investments on the fly.

Given that we’ve come so far since the first cellphone call was made 42 years ago, where are we likely headed to next?

Well, global networking powerhouse Cisco has lifted the cloth on its crystal ball and offered up its predictions for where mobile and mobile data are going in the next few years. And if it’s anywhere near right, then we’re in for some astonishing growth in both spaces.

1. Global mobile data traffic will increase nearly tenfold between 2014 and 2019

Mobile data traffic will grow at a compound annual growth rate (CAGR) of 57% from 2014 to 2019, reaching 24.3 exabytes per month by 2019.

Cisco Exabytes

2. By 2019 there will be nearly 1.5 mobile devices for every person on the planet

There will be 11.5 billion mobile-connected devices by 2019, including M2M modules—exceeding the world’s projected population at that time (7.6 billion).

Cisco devices

3. Mobile network connection speeds will increase more than twofold by 2019

The average mobile network connection speed (1.7 Mbps in 2014) will reach nearly 4.0 megabits per second (Mbps) by 2019. By 2016, average mobile network connection speed will surpass 2.0 Mbps.

4. By 2019, 4G will be 26% of connections, but 68% of total traffic

By 2019, a 4G connection will generate 10 times more traffic on average than a non-4G connection.

<center<Cisco 4G traffic

5. By 2019, more than half of all devices connected to the mobile network will be “smart” devices

Globally, 54% of mobile devices will be smart devices by 2019, up from 26 percent in 2014. The vast majority of mobile data traffic (97 percent) will originate from these smart devices by 2019, up from 88% in 2014.

6. By 2019, 54% of all global mobile devices could potentially be capable of connecting to an IPv6 mobile network

More than 6.2 billion devices will be IPv6-capable by 2019.

7. Nearly three-fourths of the world’s mobile data traffic will be video by 2019

Mobile video will increase 13-fold between 2014 and 2019, accounting for 72% of total mobile data traffic by the end of the forecast period.

Cisco Video

8. By 2019, mobile-connected tablets will generate nearly double the traffic generated by the entire global mobile network in 2014

The amount of mobile data traffic generated by tablets by 2019 (3.2 exabytes per month) will be 1.3 times higher than the total amount of global mobile data traffic in 2014 (2.5 exabytes per month).

9. The average smartphone will generate 4.0 GB of traffic per month by 2019

That’s a fivefold increase over the 2014 average of 819 MB per month. By 2019, aggregate smartphone traffic will be 10.5 times greater than it is today, with a CAGR of 60 percent.

10. By 2016, more than half of all traffic from mobile-connected devices (almost 14 exabytes) will be offloaded to the fixed network by means of Wi-Fi devices and femtocells each month

Without Wi-Fi and femtocell offload, total mobile data traffic would grow at a CAGR of 62 percent between 2014 and 2019, instead of the projected CAGR of 57 percent.

11. The Middle East and Africa will have the strongest mobile data traffic growth of any region with a 72% CAGR

This region will be followed by Central and Eastern Europe at 71 percent and Latin America at 59 percent.