Mobile Banking App Usage in the U.S. Increases 45 Percent from Q4 2010 – comScore, Inc

Mobile Banking App Usage in the U.S. Increases 45 Percent from Q4 2010 – comScore, Inc.

Nearly 14 Percent of U.S. Mobile Subscribers Accessed Banking Services on Their Devices

RESTON, VA, October 26, 2011 – comScore, Inc. (NASDAQ: SCOR), a leader in measuring the digital world, today released an analysis of mobile financial services usage in the U.S. showing that 32.5 million Americans accessed mobile banking information on their devices at the end of Q2 2011 in June, representing 13.9 percent of all mobile users. The study also revealed that 12.7 million mobile users reported using banking apps, showing a notable increase of 45 percent from Q4 2010. These findings and others will be presented via a complimentary live webinar, The State of the U.S. Mobile Financial Services Industry, on October 27. For more information and to register, please visit: https://www1.gotomeeting.com/register/220422985.

“The investments in mobile made by financial services institutions, along with the continued growth in smartphone adoption, have had a truly positive effect on the use of mobile financial services,” said Sarah Lenart, comScore vice president for Marketing Solutions. “New apps and mobile-enhanced sites have made it easier for customers to seek out financial information using mobile devices. With tablets and other web-enabled connected devices gaining popularity in addition to smartphones, financial service institutions are poised for additional growth in mobile access.”

Mobile Banking and Credit Card Usage See Highest Increases in Visitation

Nearly 14 percent of the total U.S. mobile audience (32.5 million users) accessed mobile banking services in June 2011, up 21 percent from Q4 2010. Mobile credit card services saw an even greater increase, with 18.4 million mobile users accessing credit card information, up 23 percent from December 2010. Mobile auto and property insurance services also exhibited strong gains as 7.2 million mobile users accessed insurance information on their devices – a 19-percent increase.

Mobile Financial Services Usage
3 Month Avg. Ending June 2011 vs. December 2010
Total U.S. Mobile Subscribers Ages 13+
Source: comScore MobiLens
Mobile Financial Services CategoryAccessed in the Past Month Unique Mobile Audience (000)
Dec-2010 Jun-2011 Percent Change
Banking Information 26,765 32,451 21%
Credit Card Information 14,931 18,356 23%
Auto or Property Insurance Information 6,041 7,169 19%
Brokerage or Stock Information 8,695 9,576 10%

App Usage Increased Significantly for Banking and Credit Card Servicing

With the steady growth in smartphone adoption over the past year, the use of apps to access mobile financial information has grown as well. In particular, mobile banking and credit card app usage have seen sizeable increases. 12.7 million mobile users reported having used a banking app in June (up 45 percent from Q4 2010), while 6.0 million users used a credit card app (up 43 percent).

App and Browser Usage Among Mobile Financial Services Users
3 Month Avg. Ending June 2011 vs. December 2010
Total U.S. Mobile Subscribers Ages 13+
Source: comScore MobiLens
Mobile Financial Services CategoryAccessed in the Past Month Unique Mobile Audience (000)
Dec-2010 Jun-2011 Percent Change
Mobile App Usage
Banking Information 8,747 12,706 45%
Credit Card Information 4,187 6,003 43%
Mobile Browser Usage
Banking Information 15,439 17,561 14%
Credit Card Information 8,891 10,430 17%

Credit Card Customer Engagement Increases in Frequency through Mobile Channels

An analysis of credit card customers’ engagement with various account channels shows users reporting more frequent access through mobile channels than fixed-line computers in Q2 2011. 62 percent of credit card customers reported using an app to visit a bank’s web site at least once a week, and 52 percent reported checking in with the same frequency via a mobile browser. In comparison, only 34 percent of users responded checking into their accounts with the same frequency from a fixed-line computer.

Frequency in Channel Usage Among Credit Card Customers
(Q: You indicated having accessed your primary credit card account in the past 12 months in the following way(s). Please indicate how frequently you access your account using each of these methods.)
Q2 2011
Source: comScore Mobile Financial Services Advisor
Channel Usage Percentage of Respondents
Every Day Once Per Week Once Per Month
Visited a local / branch office 11% 27% 31%
Call the bank via phone 5% 10% 17%
Visited bank’s web site via PC 6% 28% 52%
Visited bank’s web site via mobile browser 15% 37% 26%
Visited bank’s web site via app 12% 50% 26%
Clicked on link in text message 26% 46% 13%

“While mobile channels have not reached the same penetration that traditional online channels have for the use of financial services, it is interesting to note that mobile users access their credit card accounts on a more frequent basis,” observed Ms. Lenart. “Digitally-savvy customers have begun to use mobile and other connected devices such as tablets to engage in online activities that once used to be limited to the computer and are doing so more frequently because of the portability and convenience offered by these devices. As users continue to incorporate the use of these devices into their everyday lives, financial services institutions can expect to see a more engaged audience grow from their mobile channels.”

State of U.S. Mobile Financial Services Webinar

comScore director Stephanie Houck will be presenting these insights and further analysis from the Q2 2011 comScore Mobile Financial Advisor in a webinar on October 27 from 2:00-3:00 PM ET. The comScore Mobile Financial Advisor is a quarterly report that combines insights from comScore MobiLens (a survey-based service) and a dedicated re-contact survey focused on mobile financial service activities. For more information and to register, please visit: https://www1.gotomeeting.com/register/220422985.

For more information on comScore Financial Services Solutions, please contact Sarah Lenart, vice president of comScore Marketing Solutions, at slenart@comscore.com.

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Traffic to European newspaper websites up 11% in 2011

Traffic to European newspaper websites up 11% in 2011.

Thursday August 18, 2011, Martin Bryant

Traffic to European newspaper sites up 11% in 2011, Facebook growing as a source

newspapers

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Newspaper website traffic is on the rise in Europe, and Facebook’s importance to those sites is growing, according to new data from comScore.

The figures show that in June this year, Facebook accounted for at least 7.4% of traffic to the top five newspaper sites in Europe – almost double what it was a year before.

Germany’s Bild saw the biggest increase, with its percentage of traffic from Facebook increasing from 3% in June 2010 to 14% a year later. Interestingly, The Guardian, which in 2010 had the largest percentage of Facebook-derived traffic of the newspapers listed, saw the smallest increase, up by just 2.7 percentage points.

In all, European newspaper site audience increased 11% between June 2010 and June 2011, according to comScore. The Daily Mail’s website Mail Online (which has been in hot water this week over unattributed image usage) proved the most popular newspaper site, with 17,206,000 unique visitors throughout June, The Guardian and Bild took second and third place.

While comScore data should be taken with a grain of salt, as physical newspaper circulations drop it will be heartening news for publishers that website visits are trending upwards – they just need to find a solid way of making enough money from them to compensate for falling print sales.

Sources: Image source

Google+ atteint les 25 millions d’utilisateurs

Google+ atteint les 25 millions d’utilisateurs.

Edition du 04/08/2011

Google+ atteint les 25 millions d'utilisateurs

ComScore confirme le succès instantané du réseau social Google+.

Le réseau social Google+, lancé fin juin dernier, a déjà rassemblé 25 millions d’utilisateurs, d’après les données de l’institut ComScore. L’offensive du géant de l’Internet envers Facebook se solde par un bon démarrage dont la pérennisation sera la clef.

Facebook a dû attendre trois années pour arriver à ce chiffre. Le réseau social fondé par Mark Zuckenberg compte cependant aujourd’hui plus de 750 millions d’inscrits à travers le monde.

Les Américains apparaissent comme les plus adeptes du service avec 6,44 millions d’utilisateurs issus des Etats-Unis. L’Inde suit avec 3,62 millions de personnes.

The Most Engaged Population In Europe Is Dutch But The Future Is Russian

The Most Engaged Population In Europe Is Dutch But The Future Is Russian.

Comscore Media Metrix shares lots of fabulous data — but their most recent release of data relating to May was amongst the richest they’ve ever released to the public. Interesting at first sight, is the fact that the Netherlands are the most engaged population online (as you can see in the chart below) beating the Turkish by a small margin.

Engagement in this context means the number of page views per month per average visitor. I was disappointed to note that my other family home of Austria is at the bottom of the league (probably because it’s a very beautiful country and time is spent outdoors) but most of the rest of the engagement chart fits with what I might expect.

Comscore Media Metrix Data May 2011 Shows The Most Engaged Populations in Europe

 

Further analysis of the data, however, produces some fascinating insights. Those of us that work in search marketing are well used to talking about “Internet penetration” meaning the availability of an Internet connection as a percentage of the total population.

Comscore’s data enabled us to go a little deeper and ask, “Which population uses their Internet connection the most?” In other words, we can check the Internet reach, as shown in the chart below — which might result in some of us re-drawing our planned marketing maps for the future.

The chart compares the number of active visitors to websites during May (provided by that same Comscore release), then compared with the current populations of those countries (based on European Union data for European countries and World Bank data for Russia and Turkey). As far as I’m aware, no one has looked at the data in this way before.

Things Have Changed In France Too

What you can immediately see is that the Web reaches more people as a percentage of the population in the Netherlands than anywhere else. My good friend Bas van den Beld is quite right when he says the Dutch are very active on the Web. In fact, the Dutch are obsessed with the Web far beyond any other current European nation.

Next to the top are the Nordic countries which is not so much of a surprise, but how things have changed in France! It is not so long ago we were defending French use of the Web on the basis that they had something called “Minitel” which they had been using for years to carry out electronic searches. We no longer need to protect them — they’re now ahead of the Germans and the British in terms of how active the population is online.

The Most Active Populations Online According To Comscore May 2011 With WebCertain Analysis

 

But it won’t always be like that. It’s always fun to extrapolate current data into the future and this is no exception. Because of the level of activity per user of the Russians and Turks is quite high — despite their current lower internet penetration rates — when you look into the future assuming that 100% of the population are online, you get the mind blowing chart below.

The active Russian Web population is only very slightly smaller than Germany thanks to a large population of which currently only one third have Internet access. When all are online, it becomes a large grouping and given their above average engagement levels, they end up shooting off the chart.

The Future Most Active Population Online Based On Comscore May 2011 Data. Analysis By WebCertain

 

What should search marketers do differently? Firstly, forget the old FIGS model of France, Italy, Germany and Spain as the automatic choices to roll out your business. You should immediately think about running your test marketing activities in the Netherlands rather than anywhere else. Culturally, by the way, the Dutch are a population well used to compensating for other nations “localization” errors — though that doesn’t mean you shouldn’t try harder!

Target A New Set Of Countries

Additionally, you should consider developing your business initially around Russia, Germany, Turkey, France, UK, Italy, Spain and Poland. That way, you’ll be future-proofed and a couple of steps ahead of your competitors by the time they realize it too. Unless they read SearchEngineLand.com of course!

Young European Women Spent Most Time on Social Networks

Young European Women Spent Most Time on Social Networks.

A demographic analysis of time spent on social networking sites in five leading European markets (France, Germany, Italy, Spain and United Kingdom) revealed that females spent significantly more time on social networks than males across all age groups, during April 2011. Females aged between 15-24 years were the most engaged audience as they spent 8.4 hours on social networking sites, followed by 45-54 years old women with 5.5 hours which is double the time spent than men in the same age group during the month.

Average Hours Spent On Social Networking Sites in EU5

comScore adopts ABC UK / IAB US “Unique Browsers” MetricCouls

Could sound boring … but it’s crucial !

Jodi mcdermotJodi McDermott [pictured], Senior Director for Product Management at comScore, Inc., provides I-COM with the FAQ document pertaining to the change of “Unique Vistors” to “Unique Browsers.”

Why has the term “Browser” been selected?
Browsers have traditionally been referenced as an application on a user’s computer used to access content on the internet. Devices used to access digital content are much broader in scope than the traditional “browser”, however, the term browser is the naming convention multiple industry organizations such as ABCe and IAB have standardized against when measuring these devices in aggregate.

What industry associations have adopted the term “Unique Browsers”?
Both ABCe and the IAB have adopted the term “Unique Browsers” in their documentation when referring to counting cookies or some other unique identifier in web analytics. In preparing for this metric change, we consulted with these organizations, as well as many others, to ensure that our definition aligned with industry standards

 

via i-com.typepad.com/files/unique-browser-faq.pdf

What is being announced today?

Today the Nedstat business unit of comScore is announcing the renaming of the metric Unique

Visitors inside of the Sitestat platform to Unique Browsers.

Why is this change being made?

We are making this change to adhere to industry metric standards and to differentiate between the terms Unique Visitors (as reported by audience measurement) and Unique Browsers (as reported by site measurement) based on the inherent definition of each metric name.

The Unique Visitor metric as reported by site measurements is different from unique people and thus not represented accurately by the term visitor. This has been a heavily debated topic within the web analytics industry as well as amongst individuals within organizations who are trying to interpret the various metrics represented in their internal reports.

comScore is in a unique position to provide both the Unique Visitors (for audience measurement) and the Unique Browsers metric (for site measurement) to our customers. In order to do so effectively, the metrics need to be provided with naming conventions that differentiate them within our product line and to the researchers, analysts and executives who rely upon our measurements to inform decisionmaking within their businesses.

Why has the term “Browser” been selected?

Browsers have traditionally been referenced as an application on a user’s computer used to access content on the internet. Devices used to access digital content are much broader in scope than the traditional “browser”, however, the term browser is the naming convention multiple industry organizations such as ABCe and IAB have standardized against when measuring these devices in aggregate.

In Sitestat, what is the definition of the term “Browser”?

With the transition of Visitors to Browsers, the definition of the term “Browser” as used in Sitestat is as

follows:

A unique identifier to measure the number of device profiles requesting content. Device profiles may include  individual  browser  versions  on  a  PC,  mobile  phone  or  internet  enabled  device.  Any  single device can use multiple browsers. In the Unique Browsers metric definition, each identified browser is counted only once.

The Sitestat  platform  uses  cookies  to measure browsers. If the browser does not accept cookies, we will use the IP/User Agent combination as the unique identifier for the browser.

The browser type reports will also still be accessible inside of Sitestat.  These report items and predefined reports provide insights into the types of browsers that we are counting, such as which version of Internet Explorer, Firefox or Safari.

What is the definition of the metric “Unique Browsers”?

The metric Unique Browsers has same technical definition as the legacy metric term Unique Visitors. Specifically this metric is defined in Sitestat as: The unduplicated count of browsers for your site. Each browser is counted only once in the Unique Browsers metric for the reporting period.

Where will I see the changes in the Sitestat product?

Over the next few weeks, we will be making changes in the Sitestat GUI to rename the report items and default reports to utilize the Unique Browser metric name. As the metric is referenced in many locations throughout the Sitestat  product  (including Live Segmentation, Report Builder, Office Link and our OneCall API) and documentation, this change may take some time to permeate throughout the Sitestat platform.  We ask for your patience as we go through this terminology change as there may be some time where both metric names will be visible in reports and other items.

What does the metric Unique Visitors (as reported by audience measurement) measure that Unique Browsers does not?

comScore reports Unique Visitors as a metric in our syndicated audience reporting based on people measurement – the measuring of unique persons. We do this through a methodology called Unified Digital Measurement (UDM). This is a combination of the comScore panel where over 2 million opt-in users allow comScore to observe and measure their browsing behavior along with census collected data provided by websites participating in UDM. This approach bridges the gap between cookies and people where purely census based solutions (cookie/IP-user agent centric) and panel reporting do not.

Some examples of the issues that we can address through this methodology include:

• Multiple cookies per user on a machine

• Multiple users per machine within a household

• Multiple device usage to access digital content

• Same person, multiple browsers on a machine

• De-duplication across home and work access by a person

• Shared usage by multiple users in locations such as internet cafes

What industry associations have adopted the term “Unique Browsers”?

Both ABCE and the IAB have adopted the term “Unique Browsers” in their documentation when referring to counting cookies or some other unique identifier in web analytics. In preparing for this metric change, we consulted with these organizations, as well as many others, to ensure that our definition aligned with industry standards.

To read more about the IAB standards on audience and web measurement, please visit the IAB

website at: http://www.iab.net/media/file/audience_reach_022009.pdfPAGE 3

comScore Reports January 2011 U.S. Mobile Subscriber Market Share – comScore, Inc

via comScore Reports January 2011 U.S. Mobile Subscriber Market Share – comScore, Inc.

RESTON, VA, March 7, 2011– comScore, Inc. (NASDAQ: SCOR), a leader in measuring the digital world, today released data from thecomScore MobiLensservice, reporting key trends in the U.S. mobile phone industry during the three month average period ending January 2011. The study surveyed more than 30,000 U.S. mobile subscribers and found Samsung to be the top handset manufacturer overall with 24.9 percent market share. Google Android took the lead among smartphone platforms with 31.2 percent market share, after two short months in second place.

OEM Market Share

For the three month average period ending in January, 234 million Americans ages 13 and older used mobile devices. Device manufacturer Samsung ranked as the top OEM with 24.9 percent of U.S. mobile subscribers, up 0.7 percentage points from the three month period ending in October. LG ranked second with 20.8 percent share, followed by Motorola (16.5 percent), RIM (8.6 percent) and Apple (7.0 percent).

Smartphone Platform Market Share

65.8 million people in the U.S. owned smartphones during the three months ending in January 2011, up 8 percent from the preceding three-month period. Google Android captured the #1 ranking among smartphone platforms for the first time in January with 31.2 percent market share. RIM ranked second with 30.4 percent market share, followed by Apple with 24.7 percent. Microsoft (8.0 percent) and Palm (3.2 percent) rounded out the top five.

Mobile Content Usage

In January, 68.1 percent of U.S. mobile subscribers used text messaging on their mobile device, while browsers were used by 37.0 percent of subscribers (up 0.8 percentage points). Subscribers who used downloaded applications comprised 35.3 percent of the mobile audience, representing an increase of 1.6 percentage points. Accessing of social networking sites or blogs increased 1.1 percentage points, representing 25.3 percent of mobile subscribers. Playing games represented 23.7 percent of the mobile audience, while listening to music represented 16.5 percent (up 1.1 percentage points).

Top Mobile OEMs
3 Month Avg. Ending Jan. 2011 vs. 3 Month Avg. Ending Oct. 2010
Total U.S. Mobile Subscribers Ages 13+
Source: comScore MobiLens
Share (%) of Mobile Subscribers
Oct-10 Jan-11 Point Change
Total Mobile Subscribers 100.0% 100.0% N/A
Samsung 24.2% 24.9% 0.7
LG 21.0% 20.8% -0.2
Motorola 17.7% 16.5% -1.2
RIM 9.3% 8.6% -0.7
Apple 6.4% 7.0% 0.6
Top Smartphone Platforms
3 Month Avg. Ending Jan. 2011 vs. 3 Month Avg. Ending Oct. 2010
Total U.S. Smartphone Subscribers Ages 13+
Source: comScore MobiLens
Share (%) of Smartphone Subscribers
Oct-10 Jan-11 Point Change
Total Smartphone Subscribers 100.0% 100.0% N/A
Google 23.5% 31.2% 7.7
RIM 35.8% 30.4% -5.4
Apple 24.6% 24.7% 0.1
Microsoft 9.7% 8.0% -1.7
Palm 3.9% 3.2% -0.7
Mobile Content Usage
3 Month Avg. Ending Jan. 2011 vs. 3 Month Avg. Ending Oct. 2010
Total U.S. Mobile Subscribers Ages 13+
Source: comScore MobiLens
Share (%) of Mobile Subscribers
Oct-10 Jan-11 Point Change
Total Mobile Subscribers 100.0% 100.0% N/A
Sent text message to another phone 68.1% 68.1% 0.0
Used browser 36.2% 37.0% 0.8
Used downloaded apps 33.7% 35.3% 1.6
Accessed social networking site or blog 24.2% 25.3% 1.1
Played Games 23.7% 23.7% 0.0
Listened to music on mobile phone 15.4% 16.5% 1.1