Cannes Lions 2019: GP Titanium – “The Whopper Detour” – FCB NY for Burger King

 

CANNES, France—Where exactly do you end up when you take a “Whopper Detour”? On stage at the Cannes Lions, apparently. That’s where Burger King and agency FCB New York tonight picked up a Grand Prix in the Direct Lions, along with six gold Lions across two categories.

The stunt drove 1.5 million Burger King app downloads by letting fans unlock a 1-cent Whopper—but only if they went to a McDonald’s location. Picked up by news media around the world, the campaign generated 3.5 billion earned media impressions and a 37-to-1 return on investment, according to the chain.

Direct Lions jury president Nicky Bullard, chairwoman and CCO of MRM McCann, described the campaign as “pure genius.”

“It was completely brilliant—and complete is the word. It was a complete campaign,” she said. “It used data and targeting to make you feel something. It’s just pure genius.

The Direct Lions often spark debate among jurors and industry observers about how “direct marketing” is defined when it comes to modern, integrated campaigns that don’t match up with traditional concepts like direct mail.

But “Whopper Detour” was a clear example of truly direct marketing, said juror Robin Fitzgerald, CCO of BBDO Atlanta.

“It was a coupon. You can’t get more direct than that,” she said. “But it was done in a way that, culturally, was right at the moment and the way people were behaving. It was relevant. It was done in the spirit of the brand, that challenger spirit that Burger King has displayed year after year.”

“Whopper Detour” also won two golds across subcategories in the Direct Lions and four golds in the Media Lions, both of which were awarded today. Another Burger King campaign, “Burn That Ad” from David São Paulo, also won gold in Direct.

Fernando Machado, global CMO of Burger King, said “Whopper Detour” proves that the most obvious and convenient idea isn’t always the most effective.

“So, here is the deal. I will give you two options: Option A, you download the app and you get a free whopper. Options B, you download the app, input the credit card, drive to a McDonalds, order from there, pay one cent, drive back to Burger King and get your sandwich,” Machado said. “What do you think will work best? Well, we did option A, and our competitors did too. Didn’t work. No one cared about it. But when we did ‘Whopper Detour,’ which is pretty much Option B—we hit the jackpot. That’s the power of an idea. The power to bend logic.”

“‘Whopper Detour,’” he said, “is the most indirect idea to win the Direct Grand Prix in Cannes ever.”

Global CMO Fernando Machado shares the long road to Whopper Detour and its 37:1 ROI

FCB New York’s Whopper Detour was a year in the making and redefined the potential of a creative idea.
Burger King

In the past few years, Burger King built a reputation for itself. I believe our brand has mastered the art of using creativity to get people’s attention and build brand love.

McWhopper, Google Home of the Whopper and Burning Stores—among many others—were talked about everywhere, achieved billions of impressions, helped revamp the brand and were celebrated by our industry. Surely many of our blockbuster campaigns drove traffic (bringing people to restaurants) and sales, but the main focus of most of them was to “make the brand cool again.”

That’s why we see Whopper Detour as a defining moment for our brand. There is a clear “before” and an “after” when it comes to Whopper Detour. This campaign marks a turning point in our marketing and shows what we believe the future of great creativity might be—at least for us. A future where creativity is only used for (and celebrated for) responding to real, tangible business and brand goals.

This campaign was an idea that played with technology that is not necessarily new. Geofencing and mobile order and payment have been around for a while. It’s also not easy to convince people to download mobile apps from fast-food brands, especially burger chains. Many brands, including ourselves, couldn’t get people to download their apps even when giving products away. Yet Whopper Detour increased the BK mobile app sales by three times during the nine-day promotion and by two times ever since the promotion ended. This campaign catapulted BK’s app from a modest No. 686 in the app store to No. 1 across all categories, on both iOS and Android. It also drove the highest foot traffic—people coming to the restaurant—in 4.5 years.

So, the question is: How the hell did that happen?

Navigating to Whopper Detour

This is the story of a crazy idea that delivered real business results. Scratch that—insane business results. An idea that bent the rules of direct marketing, experiential and ecommerce/technology. An idea with scale and long-term impact.

This case not only shows the power of a big idea and what it takes to make something different happen but also the reason why our creative partners (aka advertising agencies) are so relevant. Big creative ideas eat programmatic, AI, trends and even a beautifully put together McKinsey presentation for lunch. And these days, people seem to forget that.

The big idea is where our industry should focus. We used the art of creativity to get people’s attention, build brand love and build our business today and tomorrow in scale. This was not a one-location, one-day stunt that gets people to talk about it—especially industry people—but is not linked to results. When we celebrate ideas like this one, we show that our advertising and creativity industries can indeed have a bright future and will be able to continue to have fun and make great business. And that’s the main reason we wrote this case study and are sharing it.

Whopper Detour is one of my favorite Burger King ideas ever.

It took us about a year to make. The idea came to us from FCB New York and evolved a lot over time—a characteristic we see in all of our best campaigns. It involved a large team to pull it off, including our technology team and key tech partners. We basically had to recode our newly updated mobile app with mobile order and payment to now also work well and consistently with geofencing.

In fact, to make this idea work, we had to geofence all our restaurants in the United States (more than 7,000) and all of the McDonald’s restaurants (more than 14,000). Plus, we had to make it reliable. Can you imagine the amount of time and pressure to make this happen? But it paid off. Big time.

We are investing a lot to improve our guest services at Burger King, and technology has a key role in this. After all, mobile has grown to be a vital player in the QSR space, poised to be a $38 billion industry by next year, per QSR Magazine. But mobile ordering and payment aren’t new to people, nor is geofencing.

So to get people to actually care about our BK app is a testament to the beauty of this campaign, which started with a very simple PR headline: “You will be able to order a Whopper for 1 penny at McDonald’s.” Wait, what? That’s kind of a mindfuck. A Whopper at McDonald’s? That’s the exact opposite of what most direct marketing campaigns aim to achieve. You are asking people to go to your competitor before coming to you.

That’s turning brand experience upside down. And that’s showing how technology plus creativity can open new doors for brands and businesses. And while it is admittedly a bit crazy, that tends to be an ingredient in all our best ideas.

The objective of this article is to share part of our journey in making Whopper Detour happen. By doing so, we aim to showcase the power of teamwork and creativity to drive brand and business results.

The extra mile

It was the beginning of September, back in 2017. FCB New York and Waze (their partner) reached out to us to share an idea. The starting point/insight revolved around the fact that Burger King has significantly fewer restaurant locations than McDonald’s. And since in the U.S. most of the revenue comes from the drive-thru, it’s fair to say that quite often BK fans have to drive longer distances to get their flame-grilled Whoppers.

So the idea was to reward these folks who are going “the extra mile” to enjoy Burger King, literally earning a discount for passing McDonald’s on their way.

A brief description from the original presentation about how it would work.

The presentation was pretty complete, with an overview on how to expand on the idea at different touchpoints, ranging from social media to out-of-home. It was presented as an idea that would trigger headlines and conversations, both highly desirable outcomes in all of our successful Burger King campaigns.

The presentation’s mockup of social, outdoor and PR extensions

At the time, we thought there was something really interesting around the idea. We never played with geo-location before, and a partnership with Waze sounded like a cool thing to do. Also, despite the fact that drive-thru is indeed our most important channel, we haven’t really done any drive-thru ideas in the recent past.

With that said, when comparing the “voltage” of the idea with other ideas in our pipeline, we felt that there were other things that had the potential to drive stronger talkability and PR. So, we decided to provide feedback, which was pretty much: “There is something here that we like. Let’s keep working on it.”

A new spin: “The Secret Whopper”

I think if I were a creative working at an agency, “Let’s keep working on it” would be one of the phrases that would scare me the most. What does that mean? Does the client really like it? Or are they just killing us softly? I would think that “Let’s keep working on it” probably means the end.

Well, not in this case.

One thing we’ve learned in the work we do at Burger King is that many times we hit the right territory but the idea is not quite right yet. In fact, I can think of many territories that took us more than a year to connect to the right idea. And in some cases, even more than that or never at all. We don’t have an issue shooting an idea dead if we don’t think it has legs. So, when we say “Let’s keep working on it,” we mean it. But neither FCB N.Y. nor Waze had worked with us before, and I am sure that there was uncertainty about a potential positive outcome coming out of this.

Believe it or not, FCB N.Y. continued to work on it. The talented team lead by Ari Halper and Gabriel Schmitt kept thinking, playing with and polishing the idea. I guess they believed in it so much that they glanced over the uncertainty and kept pushing. So around mid-November, two to three months after the first presentation, we got an email from Gabriel saying they “changed something on the idea and now it was waaaaaaaay better” (that’s how Gabriel speaks when he believes in something). I had a meeting in New York during that week, so I decided to stop by FCB N.Y. and take a look at that “waaaaaaaay better” version of the idea.

So, the new version of the idea was called “The Secret Whopper.” The insight of the idea was pretty much the same. The first page of the presentation said:

Burger King has significantly fewer stores than McDonald’s,
so we’re not always the closest option.

How do we turn fewer stores into an opportunity and
reward drivers willing to go the extra mile for a better burger?

By turning our competitor’s stores into ours.

That was the genesis of “The Secret Whopper: A Special Whopper Available Only at McDonald’s.” Wait. What? Yes, that’s what they proposed. And we loved it.

FCB N.Y. also suggested a simple flow for the idea using our BK mobile app.

A BK mobile app flow for “The Secret Whopper” concept

The agency also presented a series of additional assets to help bring the idea to life.

Example of a potential billboard execution for “The Secret Whopper” idea

The idea clearly had evolved a lot. And the agency managed to tap into something that was very important for the brand: the mobile app. Remember that originally this was an idea that would happen mostly on the Waze platform.

Taking tech seriously

At Burger King, we are investing a lot in technology to improve guest services, and the mobile app is a key pillar in our strategy.

If you think about fast-food restaurants, most of them have tended to leverage the same technology and layout for decades. The drive-thru, for instance, is kind of the same as it has always been (always a bit of a struggle to get that order taken the right way). For years, the category—especially for burger chains—failed to evolve much with technology. But recently we have seen an acceleration behind initiatives around self-ordering kiosks, mobile apps, etc. The importance of technology among all fast-food players increased in the recent past, and that’s no different at BK.

Back in November 2017, our Burger King app was basically a coupon app. Oh, we also had a store locator (d’oh!). But we had ambitious plans.

We were working to develop mobile order and payment. That was a big deal for Burger King. It is really hard to code everything and make sure the app is integrated with our different point-of-sales systems (believe me; it’s a nightmare). We wanted the app to work with geolocation, which would allow for small variations in price and menu for different restaurants, a really big deal for Burger King. Yes. For Burger King. Because mobile order and payment are obviously not new. Even the guy who sells coffee next to my building in Miami has it. Everyone had it. So, this was a big deal for us and not such a big deal for the industry. That’s why the challenge was to come up with a big creative idea to make people care/share and get earned media at the app’s relaunch.

We didn’t think it should be a “Secret Whopper.” Instead, we recommended it be the regular Whopper. Why? Because our regular Whopper is our most iconic product and to sell that at McDonald’s would be the biggest WTF moment.

So, here was FCB N.Y. bringing an amazing idea to relaunch our mobile order and payment capabilities. We had only one piece of feedback: We didn’t think it should be a “Secret Whopper.” Instead, we recommended it be the regular Whopper. Why? Because our regular Whopper is our most iconic product, and to sell that at McDonald’s would be the biggest WTF moment. No need for a special build.

We also thought that the headline “You will be able to order a Whopper for 1 penny at McDonald’s” would be a bigger mindfuck and, thus, potentially get more earned media and talkability than if we were saying “Secret Whopper.” And that’s when the name of the idea changed to “Whopper Detour.”

A year later

I still remember when FCB N.Y. sent us a “Happy birthday, Whopper Detour” via email in September 2018. Yes, it took us a year to develop the idea. As I mentioned earlier, we had to recode our mobile app with order/payment plus geofencing on a massive scale and then ensure it all worked flawlessly in just one year. Most people would have given up, but we didn’t. We kept saying to ourselves: “If it were easy, someone else would have done it already. It’s a good thing this is freaking hard.”

Close to launch, the team developed a really cool film where our actors went to real McDonald’s restaurants in New York and tried explain to McDonald’s crew members at the drive-thru that they were there to get a Whopper for 1 cent.

An image presented as part of Jonathan Klein’s visual treatment

The film was shot by the very talented Jonathan Klein. We fell in love with his treatment. He simply got the tone of the brand and understood all the nuances:

“It’s important to stress that we are not making fun of the McDonald’s employees at all. Our actors asking about their Whopper orders from the BK app are delusional. Delusional people are funny. Delusional people ordering a Whopper at McDonald’s, compounded by the confusion of the McDonald’s employees, are hysterical.”

Our legal team was an intrinsic part of the development of this idea. In fact, that’s always the case. And we found a way to film this without necessarily asking for permission from our main competitor. The film had to be developed in New York for legal reasons; we would need to blur the faces of McDonald’s crew members and alter their voices a bit so they were not recognizable.

On top of using the hidden cameras in the cars, we also filmed wide shots with lenses that allowed us to capture footage from a distance. As in any production that tries to capture reality, it started out messy and then got better and better. That’s normal. And we were patient. In the end, we ended up with an amazing(and very funny film.

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Amazing Earned Media Potential: Air New Zealand Staff Haka to Welcome Home All Blacks

After a gruelling two months on the road, nothing says you’re in New Zealand like a haka.

Air New Zealand staff weathered the Auckland rain to deliver a fierce performance for the All Blacks as they touched down on the tarmac.

Clad in yellow hi-viz vests, the staff performed the haka as NZ1 touched down on the tarmac at Auckland International Airport about 7am on Wednesday.

All Blacks could be seen filming the haka on their cellphones from inside the plane.

Earned Media Relations: Alive and Well — and Driving Influence | Jennifer Risi

Earned Media Relations: Alive and Well — and Driving Influence | Jennifer Risi.

Five years ago — during the height of the social media marketing revolution — many experts predicted the end of earned media — influence gained through non-paid channels.

Fast-forward to today and earned media is more important – far more influential — than ever before for brands — large and small. As we enter the mobile-first age, media is a constant companion for consumers and consumers are increasingly seeking authentic and original sources for news and content. Earned media is what customers tweet about [such as: “The best new product ever”], and it often receives myriad retweets and favorites. In another valuable form, earned media is consumed through tried and true traditional sources such as newspapers, broadcast and magazines read each and every day.

In 2015, social media networks will rapidly decrease the organic reach of a brands’ content — despite the number of fans, followers and engagement. Without an ad-buy, brands will become virtually invisible on these social platforms.

Against this backdrop, earned media is and will remain a key channel to influence others – informing, educating and driving decisions. The concept of “earned” media — however — no longer just applies to traditional media outlets — with a similar “active” approach required in effective social media engagement and content marketing.

Five years ago, Facebook and Twitter were the new vehicles to promote brand stories. In 2015 both channels will become paid publishing platforms — creating the age of Facebook Zero and Twitter Zero. Today, the organic reach of the branded-content published on these platforms will hit zero — making “earned media” more essential than ever.

In addition to driving influence, earned media activities can also help to drive business outcomes on behalf of our clients. But these days it has to work a little harder to make the “sale.” For example, in 1994, it took seven touch points to convert a prospect into a sale. In 2014, it took up to 20 touch points. Today, media relations generates impactful touch points, significantly increasing word of mouth, which is the highest converter of sales/action. Word-of-mouth recommendations from friends and family are still the most influential, as 84 percent of global respondents across 58 countries to a Nielsen online survey said this source was the most trustworthy.

Today’s modern media relations, defined
Multi-Platform Content is King. Video is the most valuable tool as people process video 60,000 times faster than text. Every media campaign today should focus on a strategic mix of traditional media, social media engagement and content [video, infographics] to drive influence, decisions and desired outcomes.

In conclusion, the more the art of media relations changes — the more it stays the same. Our industry also has become resourceful at mining and converting data into storytelling, and using multi-media content will create more impactful placements. While digital has provided challenges and opportunities for brands, one constant remains: Earned media is alive and well — and driving influence one story at a time.

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Havas Earned Media : Publiek Creëren !

Havas Media Group België creëert Havas Media Earned in het kader van haar strategie die steunt op de drie pijlers van de organisatie: media, data en inhoud.

De missie van Havas Media Earned is om inhoud te creëren, op maat gemaakt en klaar om gedeeld te worden door influencers en fans van het merk.

De leiding van Havas Earned Media is toevertrouwd aan Françoise Raes (15 jaar redactionele ervaring voor onder andere La Libre Belgique, Marie-Claire en de RTBF).

Françoise Raes: « Influencers, consumenten, fans en journalisten zijn allemaal communicatiedragers die erg betrouwbaar zijn voor de opbouw van merken en de promotie rond hun producten en diensten ».

Havas Earned Media stelt merken voor om hun communicatiestrategie te ondersteunen met het beheer van sociale distributiekanalen bestemd voor professionelen en het grote publiek (identificatie van de influencers, conversatie op sociale media beheren, crisiscommunicatie management).

Via het concept van de Social Newsroom wil Havas Media Earned de sociale communicatie van merken in real time centraliseren en inhoud creëren die bestemd is om ‘right on time’ gedeeld te worden met een specifiek doelpubliek, ofwel tijdens belangrijke evenementen ofwel in een continue communicatiemanagement.

Hugues Rey (CEO Havas Media Group): « Het success van content management in real time hangt aan de ene kant af van zijn integratie in Paid-Owned-Earned waar wij al meer dan 4 jaar vertrouwd mee zijn, en aan de andere kant van een intelligent gebruik van de data om het publiek en de relevante momenten te identificeren. De Social Rating Point ontwikkeld door Havas Media is een perfecte illustratie ».

86% des premières marques mondiales sur Instagram | Viuz

86% des premières marques mondiales sur Instagram | Viuz.

source: http://www.viuz.com/2014/10/30/86-des-premieres-marques-mondiales-sur-instagram/

D’après la dernière étude de Simply Measured , 86% des top marques mondiales du classement Interbrand sont aujourd’hui présentes sur Instagram contre 71% il y a un an. Le nombre d’engagement sur les marques a également doublé en un an.

Instagram compte désormais plus de 200 millions d’utilisateurs et 60 millions de photos postées quotidiennement.

Selon l’étude qui a analysé plus de 6000 posts de marques, 73% des marques postent au moins une photo et une vidéo par mois. Un chiffre en hausse de 35% depuis 2012.

En termes de fréquence La plupart des marques postent entre 10 et 20 fois par mois, qui est la catégorie de posting qui a connu la plus forte augmentation en 2014.

Hausse de l’engagement

L’engagement sur les posts de marques s’est également considérablement accru en deux ans. Il est passé de 3,648 likes et commentaires en 2012 à plus de 18,822 aujourd’hui.

Chaque post suscite en moyenne 216 commentaires (50% sont publiés dans les premières 6 heures et 75% dans les premières 48heures). L’étude précise que les posts les plus performants ont une durée plus longue et atteignent 50% du total de leurs commentaires au bout de 13 heures.

Handle et Hashtags les bonnes pratiques

L’étude note par ailleurs que les légendes de photo mentionnant un Handle (@mention) recevaient 56% d’engagement en plus même si seulement 32% des marques les utilisent. Par ailleurs 91% des marques utilisent les hashtags #. Ils procurent en moyenne 12,1% d’engagement en plus.

Autre enseignement de l’étude, les hashtags de Localisation utilisé dans les posts génèrent en moyenne 73% d’engagement en plus.


En savoir plus sur http://www.viuz.com/2014/10/30/86-des-premieres-marques-mondiales-sur-instagram/#oPrPh2rkx0ovPLAf.99

Like2Buy: seamlessly allows Instagram users to make purchases items liked on your feeds.

Communications and sales channels are blurring – extract from CNBC: http://www.cnbc.com/id/101948093

Target, Nordstrom make Instagram shoppable.

Attention fashion lovers: It just got easier to shop on Instagram.

Both high-end department store Nordstrom and big-box retailer Targetare teaming up with Curalate, a visual marketing and analytics firm, to launch Like2Buy, a platform that seamlessly allows Instagram users to make purchases when they see an item they like on their feeds.

Nordstrom's Instagram page.

Source: Nordstrom’s | Instagram
Nordstrom’s Instagram page.

The concept is dangerously easy: By clicking on the retailers’ profile pages, users can bring up a gallery of shoppable Instagram photos, and click through to go directly to the retailer’s website. There, they can read product reviews and make a purchase through the retailer’s secure page.

Users can also use a function in the Instagram gallery, called “My Likes,” to save items for later.

“We connect with more than 500,000 customers on Instagram by posting items we hope they find inspirational, beautiful and fun,” said Bryan Galipeau, social media director at Nordstrom. “Like2Buy enhances the experience for customers who want to take the next step and learn more about the great fashion we’re featuring, to make a purchase or save items for another time.”

Apu Gupta, CEO and co-founder of Curalate, said Instagram is an “amazing” platform for engagement. He cited a recent study by Forrester Research, which found that the image-driven platform delivered brands 58 times more engagement per follower than Facebook, and 120 times more engagement per follower than Twitter.

“There’s an enormous audience here that is very engaged in what these brands are pushing out,” Gupta said, adding that it was frustrating for both marketers and shoppers when consumers couldn’t easily purchase an item they liked. “[Like2Buy] makes it very easy for consumers to engage with a product and buy quickly.”

Although many tout the importance of brands connecting with consumers over social media platforms, they have struggled to take off as a significant revenue stream for companies. According to a recent report by IBM, only about 1 percent of visitors arrive at retail sites from social media pages.

“I think that’s been the whole reason why we were so eager to do this,” Gupta said.

Last year, Curalate launched Fanreel, a product that allowed brands to incorporate user-generated images onto their websites and product pages. About 50 brands, including Urban Outfitters and Wet Seal, launched the product, and saw the rate at which traffic from Instagram turned into sales increase collectively by about 26 percent.

Like2Buy is available to the more than 450 brands that work with Curalate, including Gap and Neiman Marcus. The individual brands need to opt in to activate the service on their Instagram pages.

The product is already live on Nordstrom’s Instagram page. It will launch on Target’s page in the next few days, Gupta said.

—By CNBC’s Krystina Gustafson

Ikea built a website inside Instagram

Ikea built a website inside Instagram | The Verge.

To help push Ikea’s intensely odd PS 2014 collection, the furniture seller’s Russian division hired ad agency Instinct to build a marketing campaign within Instagram. Navigating to the Instagram account ikea_ps_2014 on your smartphone — it won’t format correctly in your browser — will open up a “website” within the app, consisting of 12 images. The account acts as an interactive catalog, divided into Benches, Tables, Storage, Light, Textiles, and Ideas. Clicking through to view either of these images brings up a variety of tags that link to separate pages with more information on each product, such as ps_side_tableand ps_laptop_station, all similarly arranged to resemble catalog pages. It’s one of the more novel uses of Instagram as a free promotional medium, and a fun way to browse Ikea’s collection.