GAFA: The Future Of Amazon, Apple, Facebook And Google – Forbes (Steve Dening)

The Future Of Amazon, Apple, Facebook And Google – Forbes.

In one of the most energetic and entertaining presentations I’ve seen in a while, Scott Galloway, Clinical Professor of Marketing, NYU Stern, Founder & CEO of L2, business intelligence firm serving prestige brands. spoke in Munich about “The Four Horsemen of the digital economy“: Amazon, Apple, Facebook and Google.

Galloway starts out like a whirlwind, declaring that he has 90 slides and 900 seconds and wisely warns listeners to fast their seatbelts. He and his team at NYU Stern have developed an algorithm that looks at more than 800 data points across four dimensions—site, digital marketing, social and mobile—and across 11 geographies. They applied this algorithm against 1,300 brands, thus providing the basis for predicting winners and losers. They see themselves as “trainspotters.”

Galloway argues that it’s as important to talk about the losers in this fast-moving marketplace as much as the winners. Galloway declares two winners—Apple and Facebook—and two losers, Amazon and Google. By “winners,” he means companies that will increase in influence and value. Losers are those that will decrease in influence and value. His valuation is relative: any of these giants could lose for the next ten years and still be terribly important. They are all, he says, “amazing companies.” He points out that these four firms are so dominant that their combined market cap is greater than the GDP of South Korea (US $1.3 trillion). They have a market cap of $5 million per employee.

Galloway’s winners: Apple and Facebook

Apple is a winner for Galloway. It is dominant both on-line and in stores. It’s vertical and global. Its future is strong in part because it is becoming a global luxury brand. That, he says, is good thing because rich people all around the world like the same things. Apple has all the elements to make a luxury brand work: craftsmanship, an iconic founder, exceptional price point, expanding margins, vertical control of distribution, and globally recognizable. It’s on the way to becoming the world’s largest luxury brand with the help of former CEOs of Burberry and Yves Saint Laurent, Angela Ahrendts and Paul Deneve. Apple is completing its transition to luxury with the iWatch, predicted to have more sales than any other watch company in 2015. Some apercus from his talk:

“The expensive watch that I wear has nothing to do with telling the time. It signifies that I am more likely to look after your offspring than someone wearing a Swatch watch.”

“There are three things we do in business. Help people survive (head). Help the ability to love (heart). Help your desire to bear offspring (propagation). As you move down the torso, the margins get better and the business gets better. Luxury is in the business of propagation.”

“Tesla is not an environmental car. It’s a man’s attempt to tell people he can afford a $120,000 car.”

“Women pay $600 for ergonomically impossible shoes to try to solicit inbound offers from men who buy such cars.”

Facebook, says Galloway, is the platform people of all ages spend the most time on. Reports of Facebook’s decline in popularity among young people are “hogwash.” It is also doing well in Europe with around 90% share of social. Facebook has the ability to track users by their identity, something only Google is able to match (through Gmail). It successfully pulled a bait-and-switch by convincing brands to invest in building Facebook communities, and then charged for access. Galloway applauds the acquisitions of Instagram and Whatsapp, as Instagram is growing faster than any other social platform in the world, except WeChat.

“The primary drivers in social are mobile and images.”

“Facebook is pulling away. The world of social is becoming ‘Facebook and the seven dwarfs.’”

“Facebook has relationships with 2.4 billion users. The Roman Catholic Church 1.2 billion. Facebook has more relationships on the planet than God.”

Galloway’s losers: Amazon and Google

Galloway sees two major flaws at Amazon. One is that Amazon is single-channel retail. Galloway believes that the future lies in multi-channel retail. He says single-channel retail will disappear, whether it’s pure e-commerce or brick-and-mortar without an online presence. Apercus:

“Amazon cannot survive as a pure-play retailer.”

“Stores are the new black in the world of e-commerce. We have discovered these incredibly robust flexible warehouses called ‘stores.’”

Amazon’s growth has slowed, as brick-and-mortar stores have begun matching prices and providing instant pickup. He announces the funeral of e-commerce companies like Fab.com, Gilt, and Net-a-porter. For Galloway, the winner will be Macy’s, which has successfully gone online, and e-commerce players like Rent the Runway and Warby Parker that are opening up stores.

The other flaw at Amazon is shipping costs. According to Galloway, in 2014, Amazon received $3.1 billion in shipping fees and spent $6.6 billion on delivery. This, he says, is unsustainable. Some apercus:

“Free shipping is a race to the bottom.”

“Uber will be the most disruptive force in American retail. Drivers from firms like Uber are going to disrupt Amazon.”

“Drive-through pickup points have exploded in France from 1,000 to 3,000 in just the last year.”

“Retailers are not sitting around like passive prey, waiting to be disrupted. The retailer of the future is Macy’s. Macy’s is a metaphor for what’s happening the economy. It is closing stores and investing in on-line. $40k-80k sales jobs are being replaced by $20k-$40k factory and fulfilment jobs. There are some fantastic jobs at the high end, but the real employment growth is at the low end.”

“The smart-phone economy is going to be wonderful for employment, but terrible for wages.”

Google has several flaws, according Galloway. First, although Google is dominant in search, other brands are cutting into Google’s share. Facebook now has 1 billion searches compared to Google’s 3 billion. Second, two-thirds of product high-value searches—product searches–are happening on Amazon. Third, Google has yet to master mobile in the same way it mastered computer search. Fourth, Google had major failures in Google Glass and Google+, As a result of all these factors, Google’s revenue growth is slowing down. Apercus:

“Google + is dead already.” It has had a “98% decline in engagement rate, year-over-year.”

“Google Glass is a prophylactic that ensures that you won’t conceive a child because no one will ever go near you.”

What Galloway may have gotten wrong

Galloway says that he hopes that most of what he says is right, but he knows that some of it is wrong. Let’s look at where he might be wrong.

Galloway may be too quick to write off Amazon. If having physical stores becomes key, Amazon could easily solve it, as Galloway himself predicts, by acquiring of a brick-and mortar chain. And the issue of Amazon’s shipping costs should not be looked at in isolation from the overall shopping experience at Amazon. If “free” shipping for shoppers who subscribe to Amazon Prime makes Amazon the primary search destination of most shoppers and so trump Google search in this high-value search arena, the cost of “free shipping” may be a smart investment, both cheaper and more effective than, say, buying advertising for the Amazon brand. Just as Tim Cook declared that he “doesn’t care about the bloody ROI” of individual business activities, what matters is the overall contribution to the customer experience.

Galloway’s commends Apple for its journey towards becoming a luxury brand raises questions. Yet in the past, Apple has succeeded by producing products that are simple, easy, elegant, useful and affordable. Straying into the field of $10,000 watches is taking Apple into the domain of the useless and the unaffordable. The gains from this excursion are likely to be small in relation to the scale of Apple’s gargantuan business, while also being a distraction from what have been the keys to Apple’s remarkable success from delighting a huge number of customers with products that are low-cost to produce. Apple’s continued exponential growth ultimately depends on producing products that will make most people’s lives truly simpler and better. It’s not obvious that luxury objects like a $10,000 iWatch, even once its current obvious flaws, like limited battery life and annoying alerts, are solved, is part of that future of making many people’s lives better..

Facebook has so far done a remarkable job of mastering mobile. Facebook’s knowledge about its users’ behavior is a big advantage. Facebook ad re-targeting works across multiple devices without dependency on third-party cookies that expire or get deleted. These are great strengths. So far, Facebook has been able to live with the contradiction of a business that appears to offer the personal and the social, while behind the scenes it is ruthlessly exploiting users’ personal information for commercial purposes. Facebook says it doesn’t pass this information on to advertisers, thereby eliminating liability for privacy protection. One has to wonder how long this contradiction can be maintained and remain acceptable, as users experience the creepiness of a commercial “Big Brother” listening in on personal conversations and immediately deluging those users with ads about subjects they discussed in conversations they thought were private.

Google has enjoyed remarkable financial success. Yet anecdotal evidence suggests that Google has become hard to do business with, as a result of a certain arrogance in dealing with business partners. This may indicate that it is becoming that worrying creature, “the highly-successful process-driven company.” A process-driven company has short-term commercial advantages. With a leading share in its market, minimal thinking is required to continue on that path. Few mistakes are made. It is efficient. Its optimized processes were a good fit for its existing market. But efficiency can trump flexibility. When the market shifts due to new technology or competitors or business models, the finely tuned processes become a prison. Now that Google’s market has shifted, will Google be able to adapt quickly? Or has it become a prisoner of its existing processes? If process adherence is the overriding value system, Galloway may be right and Google may grind steadily into irrelevance. If Google can recover the focus on delighting customers that made it successful in the first place, it may go on to even greater success.

F8 : Facebook ouvre Messenger au e-commerce – Le Monde Informatique

F8 : Facebook ouvre Messenger au e-commerce – Le Monde Informatique.

Facebook Messenger empiète sur le pré carré de solutions comme Yelp permettant de rentrer directement en contact avec des entreprises. (crédit : D.R.)

Facebook Messenger empiète sur le pré carré de solutions comme Yelp permettant de rentrer directement en contact avec des entreprises. (crédit : D.R.)

Le géant du réseau social Facebook va permettre aux développeurs tiers d’utiliser son application Messenger pour y ajouter des fonctions de communication orientées clients.

Hier, lors de la conférence F8 de Facebook, le CEO, Mark Zuckerberg, a donné deux exemples de l’ouverture de son application Messenger aux développeurs tiers, sachant que d’autres ajouts devraient suivre. Pour commencer, le réseau social va ainsi permettre aux entreprises d’utiliser Messenger pour communiquer avec leurs clients. Par exemple, après l’achat d’un produit sur un site web, l’acheteur pourra communiquer avec l’entreprise via Messenger pour dire qu’il s’est trompé dans sa commande, ou pour suivre la livraison de son colis. « C’est mieux que de prendre son téléphone pour contacter le service client », a estimé Mark Zuckerberg. « En général, la plupart des gens rechignent à faire cette démarche, ni rapide, ni très moderne non plus », a-t-il ajouté.

Facebook va également laisser les développeurs intégrer des applications tierces à Messenger, pour que les gens puissent envoyer des messages plus riches. Le CEO de Facebook a notamment cité l’app JibJab qui permet de créer des messages animés. Mais ce n’est pas la seule : il y a aussi Bitmoji, Legend et d’autres encore. Et ce ne sont que les premiers exemples de cette ouverture de Messenger. « Nous ne voulons pas aller trop vite et nous voulons nous concentrer sur un petit nombre de fonctions », a déclaré Mark Zuckerberg.

Des vidéos de réalité virtuelle publiées dans les News Feeds

Depuis l’an dernier, Facebook oblige les utilisateurs à passer par Messenger, le réseau social ayant supprimé la fonctionnalité de messagerie de sa principale application mobile. Beaucoup d’utilisateurs n’ont pas très bien accueilli la nouvelle. Néanmoins, aujourd’hui, l’outil compte tout de même 600 millions d’utilisateurs. On savait depuis un certain temps, à cause des nombreuses fuites, que le réseau social voulait transformer Messenger en « plateforme » ouverte à des tiers. D’une part l’ajout de nouvelles fonctionnalités incitera les gens à passer plus de temps dans l’application. De plus, selon Mark Zuckerberg, Messenger peut potentiellement devenir un « très important outil de communication pour tous ». L’application vient aussi empiéter sur des apps concurrentes comme Yelp, qui permet déjà aux utilisateurs de contacter directement les entreprises via l’application.

Toujours lors du F8, Mark Zuckerberg a annoncé que Facebook permettrait aux gens de poster des vidéos à 360 degrés dans leur News Feeds. Ces vidéos de réalité virtuelle sont filmées avec des périphériques disposant de plusieurs caméras, comme la « caméra » 360° 3D Project Beyond de Samsung. « Si aujourd’hui l’usage de la vidéo est en plein essor sur Facebook, demain ce sera au tour de la réalité augmentée et de la réalité virtuelle », a déclaré le CEO. Le F8 se tient depuis hier dans le Fort Mason Center de San Francisco, ferme ses portes aujourd’hui. Les keynotes et certaines séances sont diffusés en direct. Selon Facebook, cette année l’événement a accueilli 3000 développeurs, contre 750 lors de la première édition de 2007. À l’époque, le nombre d’applications développées pour le site Facebook ne dépassait pas la centaine. Aujourd’hui, des millions de sites web et d’applications utilisent des services dans le genre de Facebook Login.

Le partage social dope les ventes en ligne

Le partage social dope les ventes en ligne.

Tout est dans le titre ou presque : le partage de contenus sur les réseaux sociaux booste le e-commerce. Selon une étude conduite par AddShoppers, un internaute américain adepte de Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest et tant d’autres dépenseraient en moyenne 8,2% plus qu’un visiteur “non-engagé” sur des plateformes sociales. Inutile de préciser que les chiffres présentés ici diffèrent d’un site à l’autre. Facebook est évidemment le réseau plus efficace du fait de son nombre élevé d’utilisateurs. Le site de Mark Zuckerberg entraine des revenus dans 69,10% des cas, devant Twitter à 12,11% et Pinterest à 7,73%.

Pour faire simple, les acheteurs qui cliquent sur une publication liée à un site de vente en ligne dépensent 126,12 dollars sur une période de trente jours. Les autres acheteurs, qui ne passent pas par les réseaux sociaux, consomment un peu moins ; soit 116,55 dollars sur une même période. Pour cette étude, AddShoppers a analysé les achats d’internautes provenant de mail, de Facebook, de Twitter, de Google+ ou de réseaux sociaux à vocation commerciale comme Polyvore et Wanelo.

Il n’y a rien de magique dans l’utilisation des réseaux sociaux. Pour en arriver à ce genre de résultats, 10 000 sites de e-commerce ont été analysés. En fonction des situations, du marché et surtout de la clientèle, de grosses différences existent. On découvre ainsi qu’un courriel peut générer 12,41 dollars d’achats supplémentaires tandis que Pinterest ne génère que 0,67 dollar. Google+ lui peut rapporter en moyenne 5,62 dollars, là où un tweet a seulement une valeur de 1,03 dollar. Attention, il ne s’agit pas de coter tel ou tel service pour en connaître son poids en terme de revenus créés. La part de Facebook est par exemple évaluée à 0,80 dollar par acte de consommation, seulement voilà, Facebook est le réseau social le plus utilisé. Ce dernier a donc un impact des plus important.

Plus de trafic. Plus de clics. Plus de dépenses.

Dans un premier temps, les réseaux sociaux sont à l’origine d’une augmentation du trafic. Logique ! Viennent ensuite les ventes. Pour bien comprendre les chiffres présentés ici, il est important pour les boutiques et les marques de comprendre ce qu’implique le partage social. Sur Facebook, il est possible de partager de l’information et/ou des produits. Là, un “like” n’équivaut pas à un partage. Ce dernier a un taux de conversion 5,4 fois plus fort. La vente de produits ou de services en ligne ne s’acquiert donc pas si facilement. Les boutons sociaux sont les outils de base pour permettre aux clients de promouvoir à leur tour des produits. L’acheteur devient annonceur et c’est toujours le vendeur qui rafle la mise. Une fois dans un flux Facebook ou Twitter, le contenu partagé gagne en visibilité ce qui le rend logiquement plus attrayant aux yeux des autres internautes, qui peuvent à leur tour le partager via d’autres boutons…

Enfin, le rapport constate que chaque fois qu’un consommateur partage un produit sur Facebook, il en résulte un taux de clics moyen de 1,1. Les autres réseaux sociaux sont en dessous du social network avec : 0,98 clic pour StumbleUpon, 0,97 clic pour Twitter, 0,94 clic pour Wanelo et 0,87 clic pour Pinterest.

Social Plateform – Active Users Growth (US 2014) – Facebook: -9%, Linkedin: +38%, Instagram: +47%, Twitter: +7%

People were actually using Facebook less last year.

Facebook was the only major social network to experience a drop in active usage in 2014, falling by nine per cent compared to the previous year.

However, it is still by far the most popular social network outside of China, according to researchers from Global Web Index, with 81 per cent of internet users claiming to be members of the site.

Facebook’s decline, measured in the rate of people actively using the site per month over the year, was most marked in Asia, with native sites like WeChat and Qzone dominating.

Pinterest and Tumblr experienced huge growth in 2014, with a surge of 97 per cent and 95 per cent respectively, while usage at Instagram and LinkedIn went up by 47 per cent and 38 per cent respectively.

Snapchat was the fastest growing app in 2014 with a 57 per cent increase on 2013 figures.

YouTube was visited by 82 per cent of internet users between the ages of 16 and 64, which puts it ahead of Facebook, which was ‘only’ visited by 73 per cent of active users.

HashtagBowl 2014 : 57% of the 54 Super Bowl ads / Facebook 9% / Twitter 7%

HashtagBowl 2015 returns during Super Bowl XLIX TV ads – Online Social Media.

Marketing Land will be returning its brilliant #HashtagBowl starting February 1, 2015, this is where they will for the fourth consecutive year track all social media during the games.

During the Super Bowl 49 XLIX TV ads ‘Marketing Land’ will be tracking all the social media, such as Twitter, Facebook, Google Plus, Pinterest, YouTube, Instagram and hashtags.

#HashtagBowl 2015 returns during Super Bowl XLIX TV ads pic 3

Back in 2012 there was only 25 percent of all national commercials mentioned hashtags or social media accounts, in 2013 there were just over half of all TV ads having a hashtag or some social media mention.

2014 was interesting for the hashtag mentions during the Super Bowl TV ads, hashtags were mentioned in more than 57% of Super Bowl ads. Here are the overall stats for 2014 54 national ads reviewed: Hashtags: 31 total with 57% of ads overall, Facebook: 5 total with 9% of ads overall, Twitter: 4 total, 7%, YouTube: 3 total, 6%, Shazam: 2 total, 4% and URLs: 22 total, 41% of ads overall.

#HashtagBowl 2015 returns during Super Bowl XLIX TV ads pic 2

How will the hashtag fair this year during the Super Bowl 2015 commercials?

We will update this article when the time is right. In the meantime please do visit Marketing Land, as they will be announcing the winner and share its analysis of how well Super Bowl advertisers used social media and online marketing into their ads when the game is over.

Havas Media global partnership with Facebook’s Atlas: Unprecedented Granularity !

Atlas, Facebook’s ad serving and measurement platform that allows brands to reach people across multiple devices, has agreed a global partnership with Havas Media Group. The global deal will have a heavy focus on US and Western Europe and will see the communications network offering the ad server to its clients during 2015.

The partnership will see Havas Media Group offering Atlas to clients across Latam (Q2), Middle East (Q3) and APAC (Q4). Havas Media Group becomes the first company to announce a partnership with this scale and geographical focus.

The connection of Atlas with Havas Media Group’s Artemis data platform gives clients the opportunity to accurately track all interactions people have with a brand up to (and beyond) the point of purchase, as they experience a variety of brand messages across all media.

Dominique Delport, Global Managing Director Havas Media Group comments: “Havas Media Group has spent the last 15 years investing in market leading data driven solutions through Artemis its proprietary data platform. This partnership, coupled with our clients’ data, will enable us to find out how people are interacting with brands and then purchasing products as they travel across devices. We have been working with the Atlas team now since June 2014 and are delighted that we have partnered with a platform that can take our analysis beyond previously limiting cookie based offers. It will allow us to filter, clean and manage data with unprecedented granularity. This relationship with Atlas, including our participation as a member of the Atlas Product Council, will enable us to offer best in class, tech neutral solutions for our clients”.

Erik Johnson, director, Atlas says: “This is a great step for Atlas and Havas Media Group, bringing the power of people based marketing to more brands in more countries. Havas Media Group has been a supporter of our approach that helps brands reach real people across devices and publishers. The geographical focus and depth of potential client absorption makes this partnership significant for the industry.”

The partnership takes immediate effect with more Havas Media Group clients expected to work with the new platform in the coming months.

About Havas Media Group
Havas Media Group gathers together the global media expertise of Havas, one of the leading global communications and marketing groups.

It consists of two media brands, Havas Media and Arena Media, as well as Havas Sports & Entertainment, the industry’s largest brand engagement network.

Brands will adopt media company traits / Facebook strategy for 2015 (Inside Facebook by Jan Rezab) –

Looking ahead: Facebook strategy for 2015 – Inside Facebook.

The social landscape is undergoing near-constant change, and with that, so must a brand’s strategy. As 2014 closes, marketers are prepping for the upcoming year by strategizing ways to leverage opportunities and overcome challenges. The way in which audiences are consuming content is rapidly evolving and it’s up to brands to make sure that their Facebook strategy is congruent with those habits, ensuring success and growth for 2015. Here are my predictions for the social media network.

Video trumps photo

If a picture is worth a thousand words, imagine how much a video is worth.  Brands and users alike are gravitating more toward video content. This year the paradigm has changed as, for the first time, data shows that Pages are posting more native Facebook videos rather than YouTube videos on Facebook. Facebook is carving out their own share of the YouTube audience – a trend that will continue and grow in 2015.

We need only to look to initiatives like the ALS Ice Bucket Challenge to see how widespread video adoption has become. According to Facebook, more than two million unique videos related to the Ice Bucket Challenge have been uploaded to the social media site – garnering millions of mentions and conversations around the topic. With numbers like that, marketers are now sitting in meetings fielding the question of the year, “Where’s our Ice Bucket Challenge?”

Shareable is the new viral

Content creators have been consistently tasked with making things go viral. However, in 2015 shareable content will be priority one. Increasingly, attention has moved to producing content that is not only shareable, but content that holds meaning – the two working best in tandem. It’s not enough anymore to put a spotlight solely on number of clicks, brands are seeing more engagement when thought is put into the storytelling element of the content.

Additionally, with new Facebook policies announced for next year, marketers will have to pay close attention and evaluate the type of content being posted. Starting in January 2015, Facebook users will begin to see fewer overtly promotional posts in their News Feed. As a result, marketers will need to depend more on ad spend in order to promote posts that are product and sales specific. A benefit from this change in algorithm is that brands now have the opportunity to separate their storytelling strategy from their ad spend strategy. My belief is that this will lend marketers more incentive to develop and execute on higher-quality content strategy, which will in turn produce an uptick in the numbers of shares.

Brands will adopt media company traits 

Brands with a really strong content strategy have always thrived in an increasingly competitive and crowded social landscape, and this will become even more apparent in 2015. Brands need to take on the characteristics of media companies in order to do social well. A company like Red Bull has proven that if the content is good and on-message the audience will not only engage, but keep coming back for more.

Red Bull has become a massive global brand publisher, breaking new ground against more traditional models of social strategy and bolstering brand loyalty with their audience of over 45 million. In 2015, not only will brands adopt this strategy, but they will also leverage it for mobile.

Silence won’t be a virtue

Companies have been responding to customer inquiries on Facebook for years, but we’ve found that it still takes the average brand 33 hours to respond to a fan’s question on Facebook. In this competitive landscape, slow responses and non-responses simply won’t cut it.

In the past, social customer care may have been seen as a bonus – now it’s a requirement, and companies are realizing this. In 2015, brands will be taking customer care seriously and improving how they handle inquiries and complaints on Facebook.

Preparing for the trends above is only step one. It’s crucial that brand marketers stay agile when it comes to social media. 2015 will be about staying one step ahead of social media trends and two steps ahead of the competition.

Jan Rezab is the CEO & Co-founder of Socialbakers, a company focused on social media marketing and measurement, with clientele that includes over half of the global Fortune 500. Jan’s role is to actively push Socialbakers’s global strategy and make customers heard.

9 most used Mobile Apps are offered by Facebook or Google (Nielsen Tops Apps of 2014 – US)

Tops of 2014: Digital.

From videos to banking to online shopping, digital was top of a lot of marketers’ and consumers’ minds this year. To wrap up 2014, Nielsen looked at some of the top trends in digital including the latest top U.S. smartphone apps and operating systems.

Consumers seemed to place a premium on the Internet’s social space this year, with a big portion of the top smartphone apps centered on connectivity—be it with friends, loved ones or cat videos. In fact, the app with the most year-over-year change was one designed to continue the conversation: Facebook Messenger use has risen 242% since 2013. Facebook held the No. 1 ranking as well with its social network app, which had over 118 million average unique users each month. Google Search came in second with about 90 million average unique users, followed by YouTube with 88 million average unique users.

Smartphone penetration grew from 69% at the start of 2014 to 76% of U.S. mobile subscribers by October 2014, and a majority of subscribers used Android (52%) and iOS (43%) devices to access their apps. Three percent of U.S. smartphone owners used a handset that operated on a windows phone, followed by 2% on a Blackberry.

TOP SMARTPHONE APPS OF 2014

Rank App Avg Unique Users YoY % Change
1 Facebook 118,023,000 15
2 Google Search 90,745,000 14
3 YouTube 88,342,000 26
4 Google Play 84,968,000 11
5 Google Maps 79,034,000 26
6 Gmail 72,405,000 8
7 Facebook Messenger 53,713,000 242
8 Google+ 48,385,000 78
9 Instagram 43,944,000 34
10 Music (iTunes Radio/iCloud) 42,546,000 69
Source: Nielsen. Note: The list is ranked on average unique audience, which is the average of January 2014-October 2014. The year-over-year percent change represents the unique audience of October 2014 compared to the unique audience of October 2013.

METHODOLOGY

Nielsen’s Electronic Mobile Measurement (EMM) is an observational, user-centric approach that uses passive metering technology on smartphones to track device an application usage on an opt-in convenience panel. Results are reported out through Nielsen Mobile Netview 3.0. There are approximately 5,000 panelists in the U.S. across both iOS and Android Smartphone devices. This method provides a holistic view of all activity on a smartphone as the behavior is being tracked without interruption.

Data based on Nielsen’s monthly survey of 30,000+ mobile subscribers aged 13+ in the U.S. Mobile owners are asked to identify their primary mobile handset by manufacturer and model, which are weighted to be demographically representative of mobile subscribers in the U.S. Smartphone penetration reflects all models with a high-level operating system (including Apple iOS, Android, Windows and Blackberry).

Top 3 Mobile Advertising US (2014): Google (37%) Facebook (18%) Twitter (4%)

Publicité mobile : Yahoo ! dépassera Twitter en 2016 aux Etats-Unis.

En 2014, Google trustera aux Etats-Unis plus du tiers (37,2%) des revenus publicitaires sur mobile, devant Facebook (17,62%) et, bien plus loin, Twitter (3,56%), selon une étude réalisée par eMarketer. Derrière un intouchable duo de tête, Yahoo! se positionne à quelques encâblures de Twitter, avec 3,18% des revenus pubs mobiles outre-Atlantique. A l’horizon 2016, Facebook et Twitter devraient perdre un peu de terrain, avec respectivement 33,21% et 14,64% du marché, alors que Yahoo dépasseraient cette fois Twitter (4,19% vs 3,77%).

Toujours selon l’étude eMarketer, LinkedIN devrait enregistrer aux Etats-Unis une croissance de ses revenus pubs mobiles de plus de 800% en 2014 vs 2013 quand Amazon afficherait plus de 600%, Facebook 118,4% et Twitter 111,4%. Google devrait quant à lui se « contenter » de +75,8%. Si en 2015 LinkedIN poursuivra sa progression (+111,3%), Amazon ne serait pas en reste en 2015 et 2016 (+85,1% et +62,6%) quand Facebook et Twitter montreraient un ralentissement dans la progression de ces revenus pubs mobiles.

Zuckerberg On Facebook Organic Reach: We Optimize For Users Not For Businesses

Mark Zuckerberg On Facebook Organic Reach: We Optimize For Users Not For Businesses.

Source: http://marketingland.com/mark-zuckerberg-facebook-town-hall-107096

Facebook CEO answers questions during a live-streamed townhall meeting for the company’s Menlo Park headquarters.

facebook-newsfeed5-ss-1920

Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg answered the question on every Facebook marketers’ mind today.

What happened to the organic reach on my Facebook Page?

His answer, during an hour-long Q&A With Mark live-streamed from the company’s Menlo Park headquarters, will sound familiar because Facebook has been giving a variation of the same answer all year.

That Facebook’s billion-plus community is sharing more, which means there’s more competition in the News Feed. The average user, Zuckerberg said, trotting out a well-used stat, could see 1,500 updates a day but only sees about 100. So a business Page aiming to make it into that 100, needs to create “really good content that’s going to be compelling to your customers.”

But Zuckerberg didn’t stop there. He said he empathized with businesses trying to reach customers and that Facebook seriously considers product changes that “will have an impact on someone’s business.” But Facebook will always favor, he said, serving relevant information to its users over making sure businesses reach their customers. Here’s an extended excerpt of what he said on the subject:

There’s this inherent conflict in the system though, which is are we trying to optimize news feed to give each person, all of you guys, the best experience when you’re reading? Or are we trying to help businesses just reach as many people as possible?

And in every decision that we make, we optimize for the first, for making it so that the people who we serve, who use Facebook, and who are reading News Feed get the very best experience that they can. And that means that if a business is sharing content that’s going to be useful for them, then we’ll show that. But that means if the business is sharing content that isn’t going to be useful for them, we may not show that.

As the products continue to develop, there’s going to be more people sharing more things and we’re going to try to continue doing our best in showing the best that we can, knowing that there is no way that a person will take the time to go through every one of the 1,500 things that are shared with them every single day.

There are a lot of pages that are doing quite successfully; their organic reach is growing quite a bit because they are delivering content to people that they really want.

So if you are a business owner and you’re thinking about how to use your free page on Facebook, I would just focus on trying to publish really good content that’s going to be compelling to your customers and the people who are following you.

Zuckerberg’s organic reach speech came early in the hour-long session, which was billed as a town-hall meeting with the Facebook community, and modeled after the company’s weekly in-house Q&A sessions. Zuckerberg said it was an effort to bring more of the company’s internal transparency to its community of 1.35 billion users.