Social Plateform – Active Users Growth (US 2014) – Facebook: -9%, Linkedin: +38%, Instagram: +47%, Twitter: +7%

People were actually using Facebook less last year.

Facebook was the only major social network to experience a drop in active usage in 2014, falling by nine per cent compared to the previous year.

However, it is still by far the most popular social network outside of China, according to researchers from Global Web Index, with 81 per cent of internet users claiming to be members of the site.

Facebook’s decline, measured in the rate of people actively using the site per month over the year, was most marked in Asia, with native sites like WeChat and Qzone dominating.

Pinterest and Tumblr experienced huge growth in 2014, with a surge of 97 per cent and 95 per cent respectively, while usage at Instagram and LinkedIn went up by 47 per cent and 38 per cent respectively.

Snapchat was the fastest growing app in 2014 with a 57 per cent increase on 2013 figures.

YouTube was visited by 82 per cent of internet users between the ages of 16 and 64, which puts it ahead of Facebook, which was ‘only’ visited by 73 per cent of active users.

HashtagBowl 2014 : 57% of the 54 Super Bowl ads / Facebook 9% / Twitter 7%

HashtagBowl 2015 returns during Super Bowl XLIX TV ads – Online Social Media.

Marketing Land will be returning its brilliant #HashtagBowl starting February 1, 2015, this is where they will for the fourth consecutive year track all social media during the games.

During the Super Bowl 49 XLIX TV ads ‘Marketing Land’ will be tracking all the social media, such as Twitter, Facebook, Google Plus, Pinterest, YouTube, Instagram and hashtags.

#HashtagBowl 2015 returns during Super Bowl XLIX TV ads pic 3

Back in 2012 there was only 25 percent of all national commercials mentioned hashtags or social media accounts, in 2013 there were just over half of all TV ads having a hashtag or some social media mention.

2014 was interesting for the hashtag mentions during the Super Bowl TV ads, hashtags were mentioned in more than 57% of Super Bowl ads. Here are the overall stats for 2014 54 national ads reviewed: Hashtags: 31 total with 57% of ads overall, Facebook: 5 total with 9% of ads overall, Twitter: 4 total, 7%, YouTube: 3 total, 6%, Shazam: 2 total, 4% and URLs: 22 total, 41% of ads overall.

#HashtagBowl 2015 returns during Super Bowl XLIX TV ads pic 2

How will the hashtag fair this year during the Super Bowl 2015 commercials?

We will update this article when the time is right. In the meantime please do visit Marketing Land, as they will be announcing the winner and share its analysis of how well Super Bowl advertisers used social media and online marketing into their ads when the game is over.

Havas Media global partnership with Facebook’s Atlas: Unprecedented Granularity !

Atlas, Facebook’s ad serving and measurement platform that allows brands to reach people across multiple devices, has agreed a global partnership with Havas Media Group. The global deal will have a heavy focus on US and Western Europe and will see the communications network offering the ad server to its clients during 2015.

The partnership will see Havas Media Group offering Atlas to clients across Latam (Q2), Middle East (Q3) and APAC (Q4). Havas Media Group becomes the first company to announce a partnership with this scale and geographical focus.

The connection of Atlas with Havas Media Group’s Artemis data platform gives clients the opportunity to accurately track all interactions people have with a brand up to (and beyond) the point of purchase, as they experience a variety of brand messages across all media.

Dominique Delport, Global Managing Director Havas Media Group comments: “Havas Media Group has spent the last 15 years investing in market leading data driven solutions through Artemis its proprietary data platform. This partnership, coupled with our clients’ data, will enable us to find out how people are interacting with brands and then purchasing products as they travel across devices. We have been working with the Atlas team now since June 2014 and are delighted that we have partnered with a platform that can take our analysis beyond previously limiting cookie based offers. It will allow us to filter, clean and manage data with unprecedented granularity. This relationship with Atlas, including our participation as a member of the Atlas Product Council, will enable us to offer best in class, tech neutral solutions for our clients”.

Erik Johnson, director, Atlas says: “This is a great step for Atlas and Havas Media Group, bringing the power of people based marketing to more brands in more countries. Havas Media Group has been a supporter of our approach that helps brands reach real people across devices and publishers. The geographical focus and depth of potential client absorption makes this partnership significant for the industry.”

The partnership takes immediate effect with more Havas Media Group clients expected to work with the new platform in the coming months.

About Havas Media Group
Havas Media Group gathers together the global media expertise of Havas, one of the leading global communications and marketing groups.

It consists of two media brands, Havas Media and Arena Media, as well as Havas Sports & Entertainment, the industry’s largest brand engagement network.

Brands will adopt media company traits / Facebook strategy for 2015 (Inside Facebook by Jan Rezab) –

Looking ahead: Facebook strategy for 2015 – Inside Facebook.

The social landscape is undergoing near-constant change, and with that, so must a brand’s strategy. As 2014 closes, marketers are prepping for the upcoming year by strategizing ways to leverage opportunities and overcome challenges. The way in which audiences are consuming content is rapidly evolving and it’s up to brands to make sure that their Facebook strategy is congruent with those habits, ensuring success and growth for 2015. Here are my predictions for the social media network.

Video trumps photo

If a picture is worth a thousand words, imagine how much a video is worth.  Brands and users alike are gravitating more toward video content. This year the paradigm has changed as, for the first time, data shows that Pages are posting more native Facebook videos rather than YouTube videos on Facebook. Facebook is carving out their own share of the YouTube audience – a trend that will continue and grow in 2015.

We need only to look to initiatives like the ALS Ice Bucket Challenge to see how widespread video adoption has become. According to Facebook, more than two million unique videos related to the Ice Bucket Challenge have been uploaded to the social media site – garnering millions of mentions and conversations around the topic. With numbers like that, marketers are now sitting in meetings fielding the question of the year, “Where’s our Ice Bucket Challenge?”

Shareable is the new viral

Content creators have been consistently tasked with making things go viral. However, in 2015 shareable content will be priority one. Increasingly, attention has moved to producing content that is not only shareable, but content that holds meaning – the two working best in tandem. It’s not enough anymore to put a spotlight solely on number of clicks, brands are seeing more engagement when thought is put into the storytelling element of the content.

Additionally, with new Facebook policies announced for next year, marketers will have to pay close attention and evaluate the type of content being posted. Starting in January 2015, Facebook users will begin to see fewer overtly promotional posts in their News Feed. As a result, marketers will need to depend more on ad spend in order to promote posts that are product and sales specific. A benefit from this change in algorithm is that brands now have the opportunity to separate their storytelling strategy from their ad spend strategy. My belief is that this will lend marketers more incentive to develop and execute on higher-quality content strategy, which will in turn produce an uptick in the numbers of shares.

Brands will adopt media company traits 

Brands with a really strong content strategy have always thrived in an increasingly competitive and crowded social landscape, and this will become even more apparent in 2015. Brands need to take on the characteristics of media companies in order to do social well. A company like Red Bull has proven that if the content is good and on-message the audience will not only engage, but keep coming back for more.

Red Bull has become a massive global brand publisher, breaking new ground against more traditional models of social strategy and bolstering brand loyalty with their audience of over 45 million. In 2015, not only will brands adopt this strategy, but they will also leverage it for mobile.

Silence won’t be a virtue

Companies have been responding to customer inquiries on Facebook for years, but we’ve found that it still takes the average brand 33 hours to respond to a fan’s question on Facebook. In this competitive landscape, slow responses and non-responses simply won’t cut it.

In the past, social customer care may have been seen as a bonus – now it’s a requirement, and companies are realizing this. In 2015, brands will be taking customer care seriously and improving how they handle inquiries and complaints on Facebook.

Preparing for the trends above is only step one. It’s crucial that brand marketers stay agile when it comes to social media. 2015 will be about staying one step ahead of social media trends and two steps ahead of the competition.

Jan Rezab is the CEO & Co-founder of Socialbakers, a company focused on social media marketing and measurement, with clientele that includes over half of the global Fortune 500. Jan’s role is to actively push Socialbakers’s global strategy and make customers heard.

9 most used Mobile Apps are offered by Facebook or Google (Nielsen Tops Apps of 2014 – US)

Tops of 2014: Digital.

From videos to banking to online shopping, digital was top of a lot of marketers’ and consumers’ minds this year. To wrap up 2014, Nielsen looked at some of the top trends in digital including the latest top U.S. smartphone apps and operating systems.

Consumers seemed to place a premium on the Internet’s social space this year, with a big portion of the top smartphone apps centered on connectivity—be it with friends, loved ones or cat videos. In fact, the app with the most year-over-year change was one designed to continue the conversation: Facebook Messenger use has risen 242% since 2013. Facebook held the No. 1 ranking as well with its social network app, which had over 118 million average unique users each month. Google Search came in second with about 90 million average unique users, followed by YouTube with 88 million average unique users.

Smartphone penetration grew from 69% at the start of 2014 to 76% of U.S. mobile subscribers by October 2014, and a majority of subscribers used Android (52%) and iOS (43%) devices to access their apps. Three percent of U.S. smartphone owners used a handset that operated on a windows phone, followed by 2% on a Blackberry.


Rank App Avg Unique Users YoY % Change
1 Facebook 118,023,000 15
2 Google Search 90,745,000 14
3 YouTube 88,342,000 26
4 Google Play 84,968,000 11
5 Google Maps 79,034,000 26
6 Gmail 72,405,000 8
7 Facebook Messenger 53,713,000 242
8 Google+ 48,385,000 78
9 Instagram 43,944,000 34
10 Music (iTunes Radio/iCloud) 42,546,000 69
Source: Nielsen. Note: The list is ranked on average unique audience, which is the average of January 2014-October 2014. The year-over-year percent change represents the unique audience of October 2014 compared to the unique audience of October 2013.


Nielsen’s Electronic Mobile Measurement (EMM) is an observational, user-centric approach that uses passive metering technology on smartphones to track device an application usage on an opt-in convenience panel. Results are reported out through Nielsen Mobile Netview 3.0. There are approximately 5,000 panelists in the U.S. across both iOS and Android Smartphone devices. This method provides a holistic view of all activity on a smartphone as the behavior is being tracked without interruption.

Data based on Nielsen’s monthly survey of 30,000+ mobile subscribers aged 13+ in the U.S. Mobile owners are asked to identify their primary mobile handset by manufacturer and model, which are weighted to be demographically representative of mobile subscribers in the U.S. Smartphone penetration reflects all models with a high-level operating system (including Apple iOS, Android, Windows and Blackberry).

Top 3 Mobile Advertising US (2014): Google (37%) Facebook (18%) Twitter (4%)

Publicité mobile : Yahoo ! dépassera Twitter en 2016 aux Etats-Unis.

En 2014, Google trustera aux Etats-Unis plus du tiers (37,2%) des revenus publicitaires sur mobile, devant Facebook (17,62%) et, bien plus loin, Twitter (3,56%), selon une étude réalisée par eMarketer. Derrière un intouchable duo de tête, Yahoo! se positionne à quelques encâblures de Twitter, avec 3,18% des revenus pubs mobiles outre-Atlantique. A l’horizon 2016, Facebook et Twitter devraient perdre un peu de terrain, avec respectivement 33,21% et 14,64% du marché, alors que Yahoo dépasseraient cette fois Twitter (4,19% vs 3,77%).

Toujours selon l’étude eMarketer, LinkedIN devrait enregistrer aux Etats-Unis une croissance de ses revenus pubs mobiles de plus de 800% en 2014 vs 2013 quand Amazon afficherait plus de 600%, Facebook 118,4% et Twitter 111,4%. Google devrait quant à lui se « contenter » de +75,8%. Si en 2015 LinkedIN poursuivra sa progression (+111,3%), Amazon ne serait pas en reste en 2015 et 2016 (+85,1% et +62,6%) quand Facebook et Twitter montreraient un ralentissement dans la progression de ces revenus pubs mobiles.

Zuckerberg On Facebook Organic Reach: We Optimize For Users Not For Businesses

Mark Zuckerberg On Facebook Organic Reach: We Optimize For Users Not For Businesses.


Facebook CEO answers questions during a live-streamed townhall meeting for the company’s Menlo Park headquarters.


Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg answered the question on every Facebook marketers’ mind today.

What happened to the organic reach on my Facebook Page?

His answer, during an hour-long Q&A With Mark live-streamed from the company’s Menlo Park headquarters, will sound familiar because Facebook has been giving a variation of the same answer all year.

That Facebook’s billion-plus community is sharing more, which means there’s more competition in the News Feed. The average user, Zuckerberg said, trotting out a well-used stat, could see 1,500 updates a day but only sees about 100. So a business Page aiming to make it into that 100, needs to create “really good content that’s going to be compelling to your customers.”

But Zuckerberg didn’t stop there. He said he empathized with businesses trying to reach customers and that Facebook seriously considers product changes that “will have an impact on someone’s business.” But Facebook will always favor, he said, serving relevant information to its users over making sure businesses reach their customers. Here’s an extended excerpt of what he said on the subject:

There’s this inherent conflict in the system though, which is are we trying to optimize news feed to give each person, all of you guys, the best experience when you’re reading? Or are we trying to help businesses just reach as many people as possible?

And in every decision that we make, we optimize for the first, for making it so that the people who we serve, who use Facebook, and who are reading News Feed get the very best experience that they can. And that means that if a business is sharing content that’s going to be useful for them, then we’ll show that. But that means if the business is sharing content that isn’t going to be useful for them, we may not show that.

As the products continue to develop, there’s going to be more people sharing more things and we’re going to try to continue doing our best in showing the best that we can, knowing that there is no way that a person will take the time to go through every one of the 1,500 things that are shared with them every single day.

There are a lot of pages that are doing quite successfully; their organic reach is growing quite a bit because they are delivering content to people that they really want.

So if you are a business owner and you’re thinking about how to use your free page on Facebook, I would just focus on trying to publish really good content that’s going to be compelling to your customers and the people who are following you.

Zuckerberg’s organic reach speech came early in the hour-long session, which was billed as a town-hall meeting with the Facebook community, and modeled after the company’s weekly in-house Q&A sessions. Zuckerberg said it was an effort to bring more of the company’s internal transparency to its community of 1.35 billion users.

On Facebook’s New Ad Platform, Your Data Will Follow Everywhere – Business Insider

On Facebook’s New Ad Platform, Your Data Will Follow Everywhere – Business Insider.

mark zuckerberg
David Ramos/GettyFacebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg

Facebook has a new way to make money off of your data—and, potentially, to learn more about you than it ever could before.

If you’re a Facebook user, the company’s machines already know all the things you’ve explicitly told Facebook over the years, like your name, age, email address, friends, likes, and interests. They also already know how you behave on Facebook, including which types of stories you’re likely to click on and which friends’ status updates you like the most.

Now they’re beginning to learn more about how you behave when you aren’t on Facebook. For instance, they have the ability to know whenever you visit a Web page that has a “like” button. For years Facebook insisted it wouldn’t use this sort of data to track your activity for commercial purposes. Recently, it decided it might start doing that after all.

facebook atlasfacebookFacebook Atlas

On Monday, the company announced the next step: a new advertising platform called Atlas. Atlas will allow advertisers to harness Facebook’s data about you to target you on non-Facebook sites and apps, with ads not purchased through Facebook. Again, these are not Facebook ads, and they won’t be shown on Facebook—but they’ll be drawing on all of Facebook’s knowledge of you as an individual in order to target you. They’ll be able to do that even if you’re not logged into Facebook and have cookies turned off. Facebook calls this “people-based marketing.”

The move puts Facebook in direct competition with Google’s DoubleClick service, offering advertisers the chance to target users and measure their ads’ reach on a potentially wide array of sites as well as mobile apps. The potential edge, for Facebook, is that Atlas won’t rely on browser cookies. Cookies can be cleared, they don’t cross from one browser to another, and they’re notoriously ineffectual on mobile devices. Google has been working to address this problem. But with Atlas, Facebook may be leaping ahead.

If you’ve ever logged into Facebook on your phone, Facebook has linked your phone’s unique identification number to your Facebook account. So when you use another app or a different browser on the same device, Facebook’s computers still know it’s you, and Atlas will be able to use that information to help advertisers reach you. Visit a site from your desktop computer using a browser on which you’ve logged into Facebook, and Facebook will know you’re the same person who visited it from your mobile phone awhile back.

sheryl sandberg mark with COO Sheryl Sandberg

Facebook has responded to privacy concerns by clarifying that Atlas won’t actually give third-party advertisers any information about you. It will just use that information to make sure they’re reaching their intended audience.

But one of the biggest long-term impacts of Atlas may be to expand Facebook’s own ability to track you across the Web and mobile apps. When you visit a site that uses Atlas to serve ads, you’ll be giving Atlas more information about yourself that it could potentially add to the ever-expanding database that Facebook has on you.

A Facebook spokesman told me that the information Atlas gleans about your browsing habits will not be sent back to Facebook. “Atlas doesn’t tell marketers who you are, and Atlas also doesn’t share information about you back to Facebook,” he said. Of course, Facebook has been known to change its mind about such things. When I asked the spokesman if he could promise users that Atlas would never share this information, he declined to comment.

Read more:

A Facebook ID is the marketer’s Holy Grail: high-fidelity ID for a consumer

Facebook Extends Reach With Ad Platform – WSJ.

Facebook Inc. next week will unveil a new advertising platform designed to improve how marketers target and measure the advertisements they buy across the Web, according to people familiar with the company’s plans.

The product, called Atlas, is a re-engineered version of the Atlas Advertiser Suite business Facebook purchased from Microsoft Corp. in 2013. It promises to help marketers understand which Facebook users have seen, interacted with or acted upon ads that appear both on Facebook’s services and on third-party websites and apps.

It will also provide an automated ad-buying tool known in the industry as a “demand-side platform” or “bidder,” which will offer marketers the ability to buy ads that target Facebook’s members as they move around the Web.

The move is aimed at helping Facebook challenge Google Inc. ‘s dominance of the online ad space. Some advertising executives say Facebook could provide marketers with better targeting capabilities and more detailed and accurate information about ad campaigns than they previously have had access to.

Google reported second-quarter ad revenue of $14.36 billion. Facebook said it generated $2.68 billion in the same period.

Marketers increasingly crave data to help inform and measure their ad campaigns. In addition to the demographic information it holds about its members, Facebook also collects valuable data about the sites users visit and the types of content they click on and post across its service.

“What Facebook is doing is potentially more powerful than what Google can currently do,” said Rishad Tobaccowala, chief strategist of advertising holding company Publicis Groupe SA, in reference to the ad targeting and tracking potential of the companies.

Google declined to comment.

Currently, advertisers typically target and track the performance of online ads by dropping small pieces of code on Web users’ computers called “cookies.” The problem with cookies, advertising executives say, is they are often inaccurate, unreliable and they don’t work effectively on smartphones and tablets.

With Atlas, Facebook hopes to fix those problems by linking users’ ad interactions to their Facebook accounts, which can be used to track users across both desktop and mobile devices, albeit on an anonymous basis. For example, a marketer using Atlas might now be able to understand that a customer purchased a product on a desktop computer, but first saw an ad for it on their smartphone device. Facebook already tracks users this way across its own service, but Atlas will now extend the functionality to other sites and apps.

“The biggest impact of this will be in mobile. People spend more time on mobile than on desktop, but marketers don’t spend there because cookies don’t work,” said an ad executive familiar with Facebook’s plans. “This could finally enable us to spend more money in mobile,” the ad executive added.

The website The Information earlier reported on some aspects of Facebook’s plans.

Facebook also plans to pitch marketers on the concept of using Atlas to tie consumers’ offline behaviors to their online ones. For instance, a consumer who purchases a pair of shoes in a store might volunteer her email address at the checkout. Facebook could then use that email address to inform the retailer if, when, and where the consumer saw its ads across the Web, if the email address is tied to a Facebook account.

“A Facebook ID is the marketer’s Holy Grail: a persistent, high-fidelity ID for a consumer,” said Antonio Garcia-Martinez, vice president of product at ad-tech company Nanigans, who worked on Facebook’s advertising technology products until April 2013.

Facebook will reveal the Atlas platform at next week’s Advertising Week conference in New York, people familiar with the matter said. Facebook will begin pitching marketers on the concept of “people-based marketing,” while arguing cookies are a dated and flawed method for targeting and tracking online ads, the people said.

Google also is working on a cookie alternative of its own, although it hasn’t been formally offered to marketers.

—Suzanne Vranica contributed to this article.

Over 10% of UK Digital Ad Revenues to Come from Social Networks – eMarketer

Over 10% of UK Digital Ad Revenues to Come from Social Networks – eMarketer.

Social network ad spending in the UK is still on a strong upward trajectory, with eMarketer expecting 50.0% growth this year. By the end of 2014, social networks will be home to 10.5% of all digital ad spending in the UK, and we expect this share to rise by 4.2 percentage points in the next two years.


Overall UK digital ad expenditures, which include spending on all formats served to internet-connected devices, will total £7.25 billion ($11.33 billion) in 2014—up 15.0% from 2013. Mobile and video ad outlays will continue to grow dramatically, pushing digital’s share of UK total paid media ad spend to 47.9%.

The vast majority of social network ad spending goes to Facebook, the UK’s largest social network. This year, Facebook will see 7.5% of all digital ad spending in the country—nearly three-quarters of the 10.5% going to social networks overall. By 2016, nearly one-tenth of all UK digital ad outlays will go toward the social networking giant—along with more than one-quarter of all digital display ad spending.

Twitter accounts for a much smaller share of the pie, at just 1.3% of digital ad spending in the UK this year, or 3.9% of UK digital display ad spending. But Twitter itself is somewhat more reliant on the UK as a revenue source, collecting an estimated 12.9% of its ad revenues there this year.

eMarketer has adjusted its estimates for Facebook’s and Twitter’s UK ad revenues upward since its earlier forecast, based on higher-than-expected earnings reported in Q2 2014.

On a per-user basis, UK social network advertisers will spend £23.24 ($36.31) trying to persuade social networkers to convert from prospects into customers, or simply building brand awareness. That’s up nearly as fast as social network ad spending overall, and eMarketer expects the figure to continue to rise at double-digit rates through at least 2016. That year, we estimate, UK advertisers will spend £36.49 ($57.02), on average, to reach each social network user via paid media on such sites. That will represent around a threefold increase since 2012.

eMarketer bases all of our forecasts on a multipronged approach that focuses on both worldwide and local trends in the economy, technology and population, along with company-, product-, country- and demographic-specific trends, and trends in specific consumer behaviors. We analyze quantitative and qualitative data from a variety of research firms, government agencies, media outlets and company reports, weighting each piece of information based on methodology and soundness.

In addition, every element of each eMarketer forecast fits within the larger matrix of all our forecasts, with the same assumptions and general framework used to project figures in a wide variety of areas. Regular re-evaluation of each forecast means those assumptions and framework are constantly updated to reflect new market developments and other trends.

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