Artificial intelligence, machine learning, and smart things promise an intelligent future. Gartner’s Top 10 Strategic Technology Trends for 2017

Artificial intelligence, machine learning, and smart things promise an intelligent future.

Source: Gartner’s Top 10 Strategic Technology Trends for 2017 – Smarter With Gartner

Top 10 Strategic Technology Trends 2017

Intelligent

AI and machine learning have reached a critical tipping point and will increasingly augment and extend virtually every technology enabled service, thing or application.  Creating intelligent systems that learn, adapt and potentially act autonomously rather than simply execute predefined instructions is primary battleground for technology vendors through at least 2020.

Trend No. 1: AI & Advanced Machine Learning

AI and machine learning (ML), which include technologies such as deep learning, neural networks and natural-language processing, can also encompass more advanced systems that understand, learn, predict, adapt and potentially operate autonomously. Systems can learn and change future behavior, leading to the creation of more intelligent devices and programs.  The combination of extensive parallel processing power, advanced algorithms and massive data sets to feed the algorithms has unleashed this new era.

In banking, you could use AI and machine-learning techniques to model current real-time transactions, as well as predictive models of transactions based on their likelihood of being fraudulent. Organizations seeking to drive digital innovation with this trend should evaluate a number of business scenarios in which AI and machine learning could drive clear and specific business value and consider experimenting with one or two high-impact scenarios..

Trend No. 2: Intelligent Apps

Intelligent apps, which include technologies like virtual personal assistants (VPAs), have the potential to transform the workplace by making everyday tasks easier (prioritizing emails) and its users more effective (highlighting important content and interactions). However, intelligent apps are not limited to new digital assistants – every existing software category from security tooling to enterprise applications such as marketing or ERP will be infused with AI enabled capabilities.  Using AI, technology providers will focus on three areas — advanced analytics, AI-powered and increasingly autonomous business processes and AI-powered immersive, conversational and continuous interfaces. By 2018, Gartner expects most of the world’s largest 200 companies to exploit intelligent apps and utilize the full toolkit of big data and analytics tools to refine their offers and improve customer experience.

Trend No. 3: Intelligent Things

New intelligent things generally fall into three categories: robots, drones and autonomous vehicles. Each of these areas will evolve to impact a larger segment of the market and support a new phase of digital business but these represent only one facet of intelligent things.  Existing things including IoT devices will become intelligent things delivering the power of AI enabled systems everywhere including the home, office, factory floor, and medical facility.

As intelligent things evolve and become more popular, they will shift from a stand-alone to a collaborative model in which intelligent things communicate with one another and act in concert to accomplish tasks. However, nontechnical issues such as liability and privacy, along with the complexity of creating highly specialized assistants, will slow embedded intelligence in some scenarios.

Digital

The lines between the digital and physical world continue to blur creating new opportunities for digital businesses.  Look for the digital world to be an increasingly detailed reflection of the physical world and the digital world to appear as part of the physical world creating fertile ground for new business models and digitally enabled ecosystems.

Trend No. 4: Virtual & Augmented Reality

Virtual reality (VR) and augmented reality (AR) transform the way individuals interact with each other and with software systems creating an immersive environment.  For example, VR can be used for training scenarios and remote experiences. AR, which enables a blending of the real and virtual worlds, means businesses can overlay graphics onto real-world objects, such as hidden wires on the image of a wall.  Immersive experiences with AR and VR are reaching tipping points in terms of price and capability but will not replace other interface models.  Over time AR and VR expand beyond visual immersion to include all human senses.  Enterprises should look for targeted applications of VR and AR through 2020.

Trend No. 5: Digital Twin

Within three to five years, billions of things will be represented by digital twins, a dynamic software model of a physical thing or system. Using physics data on how the components of a thing operate and respond to the environment as well as data provided by sensors in the physical world, a digital twin can be used to analyze and simulate real world conditions, responds to changes, improve operations and add value. Digital twins function as proxies for the combination of skilled individuals (e.g., technicians) and traditional monitoring devices and controls (e.g., pressure gauges). Their proliferation will require a cultural change, as those who understand the maintenance of real-world things collaborate with data scientists and IT professionals.  Digital twins of physical assets combined with digital representations of facilities and environments as well as people, businesses and processes will enable an increasingly detailed digital representation of the real world for simulation, analysis and control.

Trend No. 6: Blockchain

Blockchain is a type of distributed ledger in which value exchange transactions (in bitcoin or other token) are sequentially grouped into blocks.  Blockchain and distributed-ledger concepts are gaining traction because they hold the promise of transforming industry operating models in industries such as music distribution, identify verification and title registry.  They promise a model to add trust to untrusted environments and reduce business friction by providing transparent access to the information in the chain.  While there is a great deal of interest the majority of blockchain initiatives are in alpha or beta phases and significant technology challenges exist.

Mesh

The mesh refers to the dynamic connection of people, processes, things and services supporting intelligent digital ecosystems.  As the mesh evolves, the user experience fundamentally changes and the supporting technology and security architectures and platforms must change as well.

Trend No. 7: Conversational Systems

Conversational systems can range from simple informal, bidirectional text or voice conversations such as an answer to “What time is it?” to more complex interactions such as collecting oral testimony from crime witnesses to generate a sketch of a suspect.  Conversational systems shift from a model where people adapt to computers to one where the computer “hears” and adapts to a person’s desired outcome.  Conversational systems do not use text/voice as the exclusive interface but enable people and machines to use multiple modalities (e.g., sight, sound, tactile, etc.) to communicate across the digital device mesh (e.g., sensors, appliances, IoT systems).

Trend No. 8: Mesh App and Service Architecture

The intelligent digital mesh will require changes to the architecture, technology and tools used to develop solutions. The mesh app and service architecture (MASA) is a multichannel solution architecture that leverages cloud and serverless computing, containers and microservices as well as APIs and events to deliver modular, flexible and dynamic solutions.  Solutions ultimately support multiple users in multiple roles using multiple devices and communicating over multiple networks. However, MASA is a long term architectural shift that requires significant changes to development tooling and best practices.

Trend No. 9: Digital Technology Platforms

Digital technology platforms are the building blocks for a digital business and are necessary to break into digital. Every organization will have some mix of five digital technology platforms: Information systems, customer experience, analytics and intelligence, the Internet of Things and business ecosystems. In particular new platforms and services for IoT, AI and conversational systems will be a key focus through 2020.   Companies should identify how industry platforms will evolve and plan ways to evolve their platforms to meet the challenges of digital business.

Trend No. 10: Adaptive Security Architecture

The evolution of the intelligent digital mesh and digital technology platforms and application architectures means that security has to become fluid and adaptive. Security in the IoT environment is particularly challenging. Security teams need to work with application, solution and enterprise architects to consider security early in the design of applications or IoT solutions.  Multilayered security and use of user and entity behavior analytics will become a requirement for virtually every enterprise.

David Cearley is vice president and Gartner Fellow in Gartner Research and is a leading authority on information technology. Mr. Cearley analyzes emerging and strategic business and technology trends and explores how these trends shape the way individuals and companies derive value from technology.

Gartner’s Top 10 Strategic Technology Trends for 2017 – Smarter With Gartner

Artificial intelligence, machine learning, and smart things promise an intelligent future.

Source: Gartner’s Top 10 Strategic Technology Trends for 2017 – Smarter With Gartner

Today, a digital stethoscope has the ability to record and store heartbeat and respiratory sounds. Tomorrow, the stethoscope could function as an “intelligent thing” by collecting a massive amount of such data, relating the data to diagnostic and treatment information, and building an artificial intelligence (AI)-powered doctor assistance app to provide the physician with diagnostic support in real-time. AI and machine learning increasingly will be embedded into everyday things such as appliances, speakers and hospital equipment. This phenomenon is closely aligned with the emergence of conversational systems, the expansion of the IoT into a digital mesh and the trend toward digital twins.

Three themes — intelligent, digital, and mesh — form the basis for the Top 10 strategic technology trends for 2017, announced by David Cearley, vice president and Gartner Fellow, atGartner Symposium/ITxpo 2016 in Orlando, Florida. These technologies are just beginning to break out of an emerging state and stand to have substantial disruptive potential across industries.

Top 10 Strategic Technology Trends 2017

Intelligent

AI and machine learning have reached a critical tipping point and will increasingly augment and extend virtually every technology enabled service, thing or application.  Creating intelligent systems that learn, adapt and potentially act autonomously rather than simply execute predefined instructions is primary battleground for technology vendors through at least 2020.

Trend No. 1: AI & Advanced Machine Learning

AI and machine learning (ML), which include technologies such as deep learning, neural networks and natural-language processing, can also encompass more advanced systems that understand, learn, predict, adapt and potentially operate autonomously. Systems can learn and change future behavior, leading to the creation of more intelligent devices and programs.  The combination of extensive parallel processing power, advanced algorithms and massive data sets to feed the algorithms has unleashed this new era.

In banking, you could use AI and machine-learning techniques to model current real-time transactions, as well as predictive models of transactions based on their likelihood of being fraudulent. Organizations seeking to drive digital innovation with this trend should evaluate a number of business scenarios in which AI and machine learning could drive clear and specific business value and consider experimenting with one or two high-impact scenarios..

Trend No. 2: Intelligent Apps

Intelligent apps, which include technologies like virtual personal assistants (VPAs), have the potential to transform the workplace by making everyday tasks easier (prioritizing emails) and its users more effective (highlighting important content and interactions). However, intelligent apps are not limited to new digital assistants – every existing software category from security tooling to enterprise applications such as marketing or ERP will be infused with AI enabled capabilities.  Using AI, technology providers will focus on three areas — advanced analytics, AI-powered and increasingly autonomous business processes and AI-powered immersive, conversational and continuous interfaces. By 2018, Gartner expects most of the world’s largest200 companies to exploit intelligent apps and utilize the full toolkit of big data and analytics tools to refine their offers and improve customer experience.

Trend No. 3: Intelligent Things

New intelligent things generally fall into three categories: robots, drones and autonomous vehicles. Each of these areas will evolve to impact a larger segment of the market and support a new phase of digital business but these represent only one facet of intelligent things.  Existing things including IoT devices will become intelligent things delivering the power of AI enabled systems everywhere including the home, office, factory floor, and medical facility.

As intelligent things evolve and become more popular, they will shift from a stand-alone to a collaborative model in which intelligent things communicate with one another and act in concert to accomplish tasks. However, nontechnical issues such as liability and privacy, along with the complexity of creating highly specialized assistants, will slow embedded intelligence in some scenarios.

Digital

The lines between the digital and physical world continue to blur creating new opportunities for digital businesses.  Look for the digital world to be an increasingly detailed reflection of the physical world and the digital world to appear as part of the physical world creating fertile ground for new business models and digitally enabled ecosystems.

Trend No. 4: Virtual & Augmented Reality

Virtual reality (VR) and augmented reality (AR) transform the way individuals interact with each other and with software systems creating an immersive environment.  For example, VR can be used for training scenarios and remote experiences. AR, which enables a blending of the real and virtual worlds, means businesses can overlay graphics onto real-world objects, such as hidden wires on the image of a wall.  Immersive experiences with AR and VR are reaching tipping points in terms of price and capability but will not replace other interface models.  Over time AR and VR expand beyond visual immersion to include all human senses.  Enterprises should look for targeted applications of VR and AR through 2020.

Trend No. 5: Digital Twin

Within three to five years, billions of things will be represented by digital twins, a dynamic software model of a physical thing or system. Using physics data on how the components of a thing operate and respond to the environment as well as data provided by sensors in the physical world, a digital twin can be used to analyze and simulate real world conditions, responds to changes, improve operations and add value. Digital twins function as proxies for the combination of skilled individuals (e.g., technicians) and traditional monitoring devices and controls (e.g., pressure gauges). Their proliferation will require a cultural change, as those who understand the maintenance of real-world things collaborate with data scientists and IT professionals.  Digital twins of physical assets combined with digital representations of facilities and environments as well as people, businesses and processes will enable an increasingly detailed digital representation of the real world for simulation, analysis and control.

Trend No. 6: Blockchain

Blockchain is a type of distributed ledger in which value exchange transactions (in bitcoin or other token) are sequentially grouped into blocks.  Blockchain and distributed-ledger concepts are gaining traction because they hold the promise of transforming industry operating models in industries such as music distribution, identify verification and title registry.  They promise a model to add trust to untrusted environments and reduce business friction by providing transparent access to the information in the chain.  While there is a great deal of interest the majority of blockchain initiatives are in alpha or beta phases and significant technology challenges exist.

Mesh

The mesh refers to the dynamic connection of people, processes, things and services supporting intelligent digital ecosystems.  As the mesh evolves, the user experience fundamentally changes and the supporting technology and security architectures and platforms must change as well.

Trend No. 7: Conversational Systems

Conversational systems can range from simple informal, bidirectional text or voice conversations such as an answer to “What time is it?” to more complex interactions such as collecting oral testimony from crime witnesses to generate a sketch of a suspect.  Conversational systems shift from a model where people adapt to computers to one where the computer “hears” and adapts to a person’s desired outcome.  Conversational systems do not use text/voice as the exclusive interface but enable people and machines to use multiple modalities (e.g., sight, sound, tactile, etc.) to communicate across the digital device mesh (e.g., sensors, appliances, IoT systems).

Trend No. 8: Mesh App and Service Architecture

The intelligent digital mesh will require changes to the architecture, technology and tools used to develop solutions. The mesh app and service architecture (MASA) is a multichannel solution architecture that leverages cloud and serverless computing, containers and microservices as well as APIs and events to deliver modular, flexible and dynamic solutions.  Solutions ultimately support multiple users in multiple roles using multiple devices and communicating over multiple networks. However, MASA is a long term architectural shift that requires significant changes to development tooling and best practices.

Trend No. 9: Digital Technology Platforms

Digital technology platforms are the building blocks for a digital business and are necessary to break into digital. Every organization will have some mix of five digital technology platforms: Information systems, customer experience, analytics and intelligence, the Internet of Things and business ecosystems. In particular new platforms and services for IoT, AI and conversational systems will be a key focus through 2020.   Companies should identify how industry platforms will evolve and plan ways to evolve their platforms to meet the challenges of digital business.

Trend No. 10: Adaptive Security Architecture

The evolution of the intelligent digital mesh and digital technology platforms and application architectures means that security has to become fluid and adaptive. Security in the IoT environment is particularly challenging. Security teams need to work with application, solution and enterprise architects to consider security early in the design of applications or IoT solutions.  Multilayered security and use of user and entity behavior analytics will become a requirement for virtually every enterprise.

David Cearley is vice president and Gartner Fellow in Gartner Research and is a leading authority on information technology. Mr. Cearley analyzes emerging and strategic business and technology trends and explores how these trends shape the way individuals and companies derive value from technology.

10 technologies que les fournisseurs de smartphones ne peuvent plus ignorer – ZDNet

  • Le marché du smartphone sature. Vite vite, il faut trouver de nouvelles technologies différenciatrices dit le Gartner. Batterie, immersion, personnalisation, affichage, connectivité ; le point sur ce qui pourrait changer.

Source: 10 technologies que les fournisseurs de smartphones ne peuvent plus ignorer – ZDNet

Les 10 technologies ciblées par le Gartner pour 2016 et2017 :

  • Recharge rapide : Qualcomm promet 80% de recharge en 35 minutes via sa technologie Quick Charge 3 de recharge rapide. La plupart des géants du secteur et de la communauté scientifique planche sur la batterie en elle-même et sur les matériaux employés. Quick Charge 3.0 est disponible cette année sur les processeurs Snapdragon 820, 620, 618, 617 et 430. Le Gartner promet que cette technologie peut changer la donne pour de nombreux fabriquants.
  • Chargement sans fil : Qi, un des projets les plus abouti en la matière, en est à sa seconde version. Une batterie pourrait être rechargée en 30 minutes avec cette nouvelle mouture. Surtout, Qi bénéficie d’une liste de partenaires importante (Asus, HTC, Huawei, LG Electronics, Motorola Mobility, Nokia, Samsung ou encore Sony).


Recharge de smartphone sans fil proposée par Ikea. (Source : Ikea)

  • Réalité virtuelle et augmentée : La réalité augmentée ne concerne pas que les lunettes HoloLens assure le Gartner. Elle peut être utilisée sur un smartphone ou une tablette, à des fins de traduction par exemple de signalétique physique, ou de maintenance prédictive. Côté réalité virtuelle, on croise désormais nombreux smartphone pour des dispositifs tels que le Samsung Gear VR ou le LG 360 VR.
  • Authentification biométrique par capteur : L’authentification biométrique devrait permettre de aux utilisateurs d’assurer la sécurité des paiements mobiles et de stocker des données personnelles plus détaillées sur les smartphones. Le Gartner mentionne que la démocratisation de l’authentification biométrique devrait permettre d’accélérer ces usages. Le cabinet précise que la détection d’émotions et d’humeur est une piste suivie par certains constructeurs.
  • Assistants personnels virtuels (APV) : 40% de l’interaction mobile sera facilitée par des agents intelligents d’ici 2020 assure le Gartner. Déjà, 74% des utilisateurs de smartphones utilisent fréquemment des APV, au moins un par jour (38%) et plusieurs fois par semaine (36%).
  • Ecrans souples / courbés : Samsung est le dernier fournisseur a avoir fait parler de lui sur ce sujet. LG est aussi sur les rangs. “Le problème est de trouver les bons cas d’usage associés car pour le moment personne ne sait vraiment quoi faire avec” explique Richard Windsor, analyste chez Edison Investment Research.
  • USB Type-C : Le standard USB-C est encore loin d’être généralisé, mais ce standard est amené à se répandre assure le Gartner. Mais il faudra avant faire le ménage.
  • SIM embarqué (e-SIM) : La bonne vieille carte SIM amovible va-t-elle finalement disparaître ? Apple et Samsung y travaillent. Intégrée et soudée directement dans les terminaux elle permettra aux usagers de changer d’opérateur sans avoir à remplacer la puce. Un gain de temps et une plus grande souplesse à la clé pour les clients et, pour les fabricants, la possibilité d’affiner le design des terminaux débarrassés d’un logement pour une SIM amovible.
  • Le Gartner mentionne enfin deux autres technologies, les solutions de caméra à multiples lentilles et le Wi-Fi 802.11.

Ces 10 technologies ont été sélectionnées après avoir analysé cinq impacts potentiels :

  • La batterie
  • Une expérience immersive
  • Une expérience personnalisée
  • La technologie d’affichage
  • La connectivité

Ce sont ces domaines dont l’amélioration permet potentiellement de réduire les soucis des utilisateur de smartphone, proposer des nouvelles capacités, ouvrir de nouveaux modèles d’affaires, ou créer de nouvelles expériences.

Combining multichannel and programmatic advertising will give brands richer audience insights for more relevant marketing – Smarter With Gartner

Advertising and multichannel marketing efforts must unite to give brands richer audience insights for more relevant marketing.

Source: It’s Time to Unite Advertising With Multichannel Marketing – Smarter With Gartner

Many customers today encounter the great divide between Madison Avenue and multichannel marketing. They may be served an ad based on their persona and then receive an email based on an alternate segmentation. However, what if a brand coordinates first-party data from their email database and third party data from the advertiser to send a customized email in the morning and an advertisement in the afternoon to visitors from a “Stranger” segment who abandoned a lead generation form? The customer experience becomes more connected and relevant.

In a marketplace where customer experience is a crucial differentiator, advertising and multichannel efforts must unite to give brands richer audience insights for more relevant marketing, noted Andrew Frank and Adam Sarnerduring the Gartner Digital Marketing Conference 2016. The mutually-shared desire for profitable engagement drives the coordination between advertising and multichannel marketing.

Why a merger makes sense

“Advertising is already part of the multichannel continuum,” noted Mr. Sarner. Customers don’t want separate experiences that mirror marketing’s silos. They see one brand and want one experience.

According to Gartner’s Strategic Planning Assumption, by 2018, over 40% of marketers from global organizations will have insourced programmatic advertising capabilities, up from about 10% today.

Customers don’t want separate experiences that mirror marketing’s silos.

When marketers combine the dynamic creative possibilities of advertising with the personalization of multichannel marketing they better serve their audiences. This richness of customer insight allows marketers to profitably engage customers throughout the various stages of a customer’s buying journey.

Furthermore, programmatic tactics match multichannel tactics and highlight overlapping interests. Both efforts use forms of real-time decision-making. For example, advertisers use real-time bidding and multichannel marketers use real-time engagement. Both seek to make course corrections on the fly. Marrying advertising’s third-party data with multichannel’s first-party data provides a rich behavioral/ demographic mosaic of audience needs and opportunities.

Bring the two sides together with the Action-Value Model

Use a three step Action-Value model focused on audience, action and attribution to operationalize the linkage of advertising and multichannel marketing. Start by identifying the audience and execute disciplined segmentation. Develop segments such as Loyads (loyal advocates), Churners, First timers or Strangers and set marketing goals for each.

See related article: The Secrets to Marketing Segmentation.

Then clarify valuable actions for those segments and set specific values for the actions. Example actions include rating an app, joining a loyalty program, or watching a video. Clarify how much the action is worth and how much it costs. Once you’ve crystallized the actions that matter to your business, set attribution by channel and by action to answer key questions. Did the campaign do anything? Were the results worth it? Were profits maximized?

Pay attention to skill differences

While interests overlap, the skills found in an advertising team are different from those in multichannel. Beyond just the hard skills gaps, there are real and significant cultural differences. Creative, media placement and a host of acronyms – DMP, TMS and DSPs are central to advertising while multichannel focuses on direct mail, email and database marketing. Be mindful of these differences when uniting the two disciplines.

Get help with your multichannel efforts by finding the right partner with research by Jay Wilson.

Gartner for Marketing Leaders clients can read more in How to Unite Advertising with Multichannel Marketing by Andrew Frank.

Learn more about digital marketing trends at the Gartner Digital Marketing Conference. Follow news and updates from the event on Twitter using#GartnerDMC.

BYOW (Bring Your Own Wearable): How Wearables Will Revolutionize the Workplace – ReadWrite

Source: How Wearables Will Revolutionize the Workplace – ReadWrite

Guest author Lindsey Irvine is the director of business development and strategic partnerships at Salesforce and heads up its Salesforce Wear developer platform. 

We’ve been hearing a lot of buzz around how wearables will continue to enhance our everyday lives. From steps and calories, to sleep and diet, wearables are starting to show their influence on our personal lives. But what about the business opportunity and benefits to our professional lives?

This year alone, we’ve seen the introduction of everything from smart rings,watches and connected headbands. As exciting as they may seem for individuals, it’s actually the business implications of wearable devices that have many of us in the enterprise taking note.

See also: The Greatest Potential—And Obstacle—For Wearables At Work 

According to the International Data Corporation’s (IDC) recent Worldwide Quarterly Wearable Device Tracker, it is estimated that 72.1 million wearable devices will be shipped in 2015, up 173.3 percent from 2014. Additionally, a study by Salesforce Research found that not only do wearable users experience an improvement in their business performance, but 79 percent agree that wearables are, or will be, strategic to their company’s future business success and 86 percent plan to increase their wearable investment.

These growth projections signify that it’s no longer a question of “if” but “when” the disruptive potential of wearable technologies will become more mainstream. When it happens, the biggest beneficiaries of the technology will be businesses in a variety of verticals.

Wearables Are About To Strap Themselves To Our Work

Wearables for work provide an opportunity to significantly improve productivity, efficiency and even safety, creating tremendous opportunities for those taking advantage…and notable risk for those not preparing a strategic response.

Here are just a few important ways that the wearables revolution for business is well underway, and some observations regarding what’s needed to drive the next phase of growth:

Intelligent Apps

At the moment, much of the wearable discussion is centered on the hardware devices themselves. Talk of the apps that will make those devices intelligent, workflow-enabled and truly disruptive is still in its early stages.

However, a focus on wearable apps—apps that will change the way we work and help bring complex business processes to life in a new, simple, visually compelling, action-oriented way—will take these devices from gadgets to valuable tools for the business. By 2017, Gartner predicts that wearable devices will drive 50% of total app interactions.

As wearable momentum grows, we see incredible parallels to the early days of the smartphone. Apps were instrumental in the proliferation of the smartphone and its ubiquitous usage, and now industries are being transformed based on the model. At Salesforce, we believe an expanding enterprise app ecosystem will fuel wearable tech adoption and help drive transformations in how we live and work.

Context in the Cloud

Wearables will enable teams to be more connected to the digital world while being more present in the real world.

Checking a mobile phone or opening a laptop during a meeting, or while out in the field, can be a distraction and a little time consuming. But by glancing at a connected smartwatch or peering through connected eyewear, a sales rep or field service technician can quickly and discretely access critical information, all while being hands free. The key will be to assure that wearable technology and enterprise wearable applications are able to leverage business data to highlight the right information, at the right time, to drive the right business action.

Tapping into a complete 360-degree view of your customers via data that your company has added to its CRM, will drive the relevant business actions, insights and workflow that are needed to accelerate improved efficiency and productivity. The potential here is incredible.

BYOW (Bring Your Own Wearable)

When people fully embrace new connected technology, they want to use it in their personal and professional lives. Forward-thinking employers recognize that an employee’s use of personal technology can increase operational efficiency and productivity. This presents a tremendous opportunity for software developers to build business applications that IT organizations can push down to employees’ devices, including wearables.

Some partners and developers are already doing just that: for example, Alpine Metrics offers a data analytics app for smartwatches called Intelligent Forecasting, which allows sales professionals to get a quick and consistent view of their trending sales. NewVoiceMedia has created a smartwatch app that takes caller ID to the next level, and Vlocity has given sales and service professionals within communications and media companies new ways to identify sales opportunities and provide better customer service, right from your wrist.

Companies that are implementing pilot programs for wearables are seeing early successes. By getting ahead of the latest technologies, early adopters are able to provide input and help shape the future of wearable technologies, making them smarter, faster, more functional and more tightly integrated with daily business operations. The possibilities for wearables in the workplace are truly endless and we can’t wait to see what the next chapter has in store.

Gartner Hype Cycle for Digital Marketing, 2015: Real-Time Marketing (more than 10 years from now ?)

Screenshot 2015-09-28 17.23.42

New digital trends surface daily, and you’ve got countless shiny objects clamoring for your attention. You need to know which technologies will deliver the best possible experience for your customers, in your unique context.

The Gartner Hype Cycle for Digital Marketing gives you a measured approach. This research cuts through the hype and shows you which technologies are emerging, overhyped, and really ready for prime time so that you can understand which trends and technologies to use – and which to avoid.

Gartner’s 2015 Hype Cycle for Emerging Technologies: Autonomous Cars In, Big Data Out In Gartner Hype Cycle

Gartner’s 2015 Hype Cycle for Emerging Technologies Identifies the Computing Innovations That Organizations Should Monitor.

2015 Hype Cycle Special Report Illustrates the Market Excitement, Maturity and Benefit of More Than 2,000 Technologies

The journey to digital business continues as the key theme of Gartner, Inc.’s “Hype Cycle for Emerging Technologies, 2015.” New to the Hype Cycle this year is the emergence of technologies that support what Gartner defines as digital humanism — the notion that people are the central focus in the manifestation ofdigital businesses and digital workplaces.

The Hype Cycle for Emerging Technologies report is the longest-running annual Hype Cycle, providing a cross-industry perspective on the technologies and trends that business strategists, chief innovation officers, R&D leaders, entrepreneurs, global market developers and emerging-technology teams should consider in developing emerging-technology portfolios.

“The Hype Cycle for Emerging Technologies is the broadest aggregate Gartner Hype Cycle, featuring technologies that are the focus of attention because of particularly high levels of interest, and those that Gartner believes have the potential for significant impact,” said Betsy Burton, vice president and distinguished analyst at Gartner. “This year, we encourage CIOs and other IT leaders to dedicate time and energy focused on innovation, rather than just incremental business advancement, while also gaining inspiration by scanning beyond the bounds of their industry.”

Major changes in the 2015 Hype Cycle for Emerging Technologies (see Figure 1) include the placement ofautonomous vehicles, which have shifted from pre-peak to peak of the Hype Cycle. While autonomous vehicles are still embryonic, this movement still represents a significant advancement, with all major automotive companies putting autonomous vehicles on their near-term roadmaps. Similarly, the growing momentum (from post-trigger to pre-peak) in connected-home solutions has introduced entirely new solutions and platforms enabled by new technology providers and existing manufacturers.

Figure 1. Hype Cycle for Emerging Technologies, 2015

Source: Gartner (August 2015)

“As enterprises continue the journey to becoming digital businesses, identifying and employing the right technologies at the right time will be critical,” said Ms. Burton. “As we have set out on the Gartner roadmap to digital business, there are six progressive business era models that enterprises can identify with today and to which they can aspire in the future. However, since the Hype Cycle for Emerging Technologies is purposely focused on more emerging technologies, it mostly supports the last three of these stages: Digital Marketing, Digital Business and Autonomous.”

Digital Marketing (Stage 4): The digital marketing stage sees the emergence of the Nexus of Forces (mobile, social, cloud and information). Enterprises in this stage focus on new and more sophisticated ways to reach consumers, who are more willing to participate in marketing efforts to gain greater social connection, or product and service value. Enterprises that are seeking to reach this stage should consider the following technologies on the Hype Cycle: Gesture Control, Hybrid Cloud Computing, Internet of Things (IoT), Machine Learning, People-Literate Technology, Speech-to-Speech Translation. 

Digital Business (Stage 5): Digital business is the first post-nexus stage on the roadmap and focuses on the convergence of people, business and things. The IoT and the concept of blurring the physical and virtual worlds are strong concepts in this stage. Physical assets become digitalized and become equal actors in the business value chain alongside already-digital entities, such as systems and apps. Enterprises seeking to go past the Nexus of Forces technologies to become a digital business should look to these additional technologies: 3D Bioprinting for Life Science R&D, 3D Bioprinting Systems for Organ Transplant, Human Augmentation, Affective Computing, Augmented Reality, Bioacoustics Sensing, Biochips, Brain-Computer Interface, Citizen Data Science, Connected Home, Cryptocurrencies, Cryptocurrency Exchange, Digital Dexterity, Digital Security, Enterprise 3D Printing, Smart Robots, Smart Advisors, Gesture Control, IoT, IoT Platform, Machine Learning, Micro Data Centers, Natural-Language Question Answering, Neurobusiness, People-Literate Technology, Quantum Computing, Software-Defined Security, Speech-to-Speech Translation, Virtual Reality, Volumetric and Holographic Displays, and Wearables. 

Autonomous (Stage 6): Autonomous represents the final post-nexus stage. This stage is defined by an enterprise’s ability to leverage technologies that provide humanlike or human-replacing capabilities. Using autonomous vehicles to move people or products and using cognitive systems to recommend a potential structure for an answer to an email, write texts or answer customer questions are all examples that mark the autonomous stage. Enterprises seeking to reach this stage to gain competitiveness should consider these technologies on the Hype Cycle: Autonomous Vehicles, Bioacoustic Sensing, Biochips, Brain-Computer Interface, Digital Dexterity, Human Augmentation, Machine Learning, Neurobusiness, People-Literate Technology, Quantum Computing, Smart Advisors, Smart Dust, Smart Robots, Virtual Personal Assistants, Virtual Reality, and Volumetric and Holographic Displays. 

“Although we have categorized each of the technologies on the Hype Cycle into one of the digital business stages, enterprises should not limit themselves to these technology groupings,” said Ms. Burton. “Many early adopters have embraced quite advanced technologies, for example, autonomous vehicles or smart advisors, while they continue to improve nexus-related areas, such as mobile apps.”