Loon vs Aquila = Google vs Facebook. Who will win the global internet solution ? Everyone, we hope !

Social media company plans to start testing the craft, which is intended to provide internet access to remote areas, within months

Source: the guardian – http://www.theguardian.com/technology/2015/jul/31/facebook-finishes-aquila-solar-powered-internet-drone-with-span-of-a-boeing-737

Facebook has revealed its first full-scale drone, which it plans to use to provide internet access in remote parts of the world.

Code-named “Aquila”, the solar-powered drone will be able to fly without landing for three months at a time, using a laser to beam data to a base station on the ground.

The company plans to use a linked network of the drones to provide internet access to large rural areas. However, as with its Internet.org project, Facebook will not be dealing with customers directly, instead partnering with local ISPs to offer the services.

Jay Parikh, Facebook’s vice-president of engineering, said: “Our mission is to connect everybody in the world. This is going to be a great opportunity for us to motivate the industry to move faster on this technology.”

Facebook said it would test the aircraft, which has the wingspan of a Boeing 737, in the US later this year.

Yael Maguire, the company’s engineering director of connectivity, said that the plane will operate between 60,000ft (18km) and 90,000ft (27km) – above the altitude of commercial airplanes – so it would not be affected by weather.

It will climb to its maximum height during the day, before gliding slowly down to its lowest ebb at night, to conserve power when its solar panels are not receiving charge.

Although Facebook does not immediately face policy or legal hurdles in testing its drone in the US, Maguire said, it was the first company to fly at such altitudes and had a team working with policymakers to help set guidelines.

The drone, which was built in 14 months, was able to fly in the air for 90 days at a time, Maguire said. Lacking wheels, or even the ability to climb from ground level to its cruising altitude without aid, it will be launched with the help of helium balloons, which will rise it to its preferred height.

The balloons will be easily capable of lifting the plane: even when fully laden with communications gear, it will weigh just 880lbs (400kg), less than a fifth of the recognisable Reaper drone used by the US military, even though the Aquila drone has a wingspan of 46 yards (42m), compared to the Reaper’s 16 yard (15m) breadth.

Because the planes must constantly move to stay aloft they would circle a two-mile (3km) radius, Parikh said.

The Aquila program, which was first tested in Britain in March this year, is geared towards bringing internet access to the 10% of the population who do not have it.

It faces competition from a similar programme developed by Google to bring wireless internet to rural communities using high-altitude helium balloons. The programme, called “Project Loon”, involves fitting transmitters to the balloons, which will fly at similar altitudes to Facebook’s drones.

Unlike the drones, the balloons cannot be directly steered, but Google claims that, with an accurate enough model of wind speeds and directions, it is possible to effectively direct the balloons simply by raising or lowering their altitude to ensure they blow in the desired direction. Project Loon was first tested in New Zealand in 2013.

Separately, Facebook a year ago launched Internet.org, an initiative to provide access to the two-thirds of the world without a reliable connection. The project, which partners with local mobile carriers to offer free internet access on basic smartphones across Asia, Africa and Latin America.

But Internet.org has also been criticised by activists in both the developed and developing world for only linking users to a walled-garden version of the internet. Internet.org customers can access, for free, selected services such as Facebook, Wikipedia, weather, job listings and government info. But they cannot access the open web through the same service.

In May, Tim Berners-Lee, the inventor of the world wide web, suggested that users “just say no” to services such as Internet.org.

He told the Guardian: “In the particular case of somebody who’s offering … something which is branded internet, it’s not internet, then you just say no. No it isn’t free, no it isn’t in the public domain, there are other ways of reducing the price of internet connectivity and giving something … [only] giving people data connectivity to part of the network deliberately, I think is a step backwards.

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BNP PARIBAS : 1ÈRE BANQUE EUROPÉENNE À S’ALLIER À FACEBOOK, GOOGLE, LINKEDIN ET TWITTER POUR DÉVELOPPER SA PRÉSENCE DIGITALE DANS LE MONDE

BNP Paribas s’allie simultanément et au niveau international, à Facebook, Google, LinkedIn et Twitter. Avec l’implication de quatre membres du Comité Exécutif de l’entreprise, BNP Paribas se dote d’un pilotage stratégique de sa présence sur ces media digitaux et s’ouvre de nouvelles opportunités de collaboration et d’innovation en matière de communication, de marketing et de relation client.

« Avec plus de 500 millions de contacts digitaux par an avec ses clients, BNP Paribas est d’ores-et-déjà un grand acteur du digital. Les partenariats globaux conclus avec chacun des quatre leaders mondiaux du numérique que sont Facebook, Google, LinkedIn et Twitter nous permettront de renforcer encore la relation avec nos clients et nos prospects sur ces plateformes et de stimuler notre capacité d’innovation pour proposer des services toujours plus adaptés », explique Jean-Laurent Bonnafé, Administrateur Directeur Général de BNP Paribas.

Le modèle relationnel a été révolutionné par le mobile, devenu le principal outil des clients bancaires pour communiquer avec leur conseiller ou piloter leurs comptes. L’amélioration de l’expérience bancaire digitale offerte aux clients est donc un axe de développement primordial pour BNP Paribas, qui souhaite leur assurer choix et souplesse d’utilisation en utilisant les nouvelles formes d’interactivité offertes par les réseaux sociaux, les nouveaux services autour de la mobilité, la simplification des processus…

Ces partenariats, qui renforcent la collaboration entre la banque et quatre géants du numérique, œuvrent pleinement en ce sens. Cette collaboration s’appuiera sur une gouvernance globale construite autour d’une feuille de route commune. Des rencontres régulières entre les sponsors de ces quatre acteurs et ceux de la banque permettront d’assurer la fluidité des échanges. Accélérateur de la transformation digitale de la banque, ces alliances permettront d’étudier et de piloter ensemble de nouvelles opportunités business.

 

***

L’accord de collaboration avec Google est signé par Thierry Laborde, Directeur Général Adjoint et Responsable des Marchés Domestiques de BNP Paribas et Nick Leeder, Directeur Général de Google France.

Pour BNP Paribas, la collaboration avec Google est l’occasion de renforcer l’accessibilité de ses services au plus grand nombre, ainsi que la pertinence de ses offres en fonction des attentes des clients. Celle-ci permettra aux équipes de la banque de renforcer leur compréhension des usages, ainsi que leur maitrise des techniques et des nouveaux formats de communication adaptés au mobile. Le mobile représente à ce titre déjà près de 15% des investissements du groupe chez Google.

BNP Paribas a été la première banque en France à lancer un SAV sur Google+ en 2013. Chaque année, plus de 110 millions de requêtes sont réalisées sur les marques de BNP Paribas. Les chaînes du groupe enregistrent aujourd’hui plus de 28 millions de vues sur Youtube avec, par exemple, 5 millions pour la seule chaîne Cetelem en France.

 

***

L’accord de collaboration avec Twitter est signé par Marie Claire Capobianco, Directeur des Réseaux France et membre du Comité Exécutif de BNP Paribas et Jean-Philippe Maheu, Vice-Président Brands & Agencies de Twitter.

Cette collaboration permettra de poursuivre la digitalisation de l’ensemble des métiers de BNP Paribas et d’ouvrir de nouveaux horizons, notamment dans l’usage de la data publique de Twitter.

Depuis son arrivée sur Twitter en 2009, BNP Paribas est précurseur dans l’usage de la plateforme en France. Elle a notamment été la première banque française à ouvrir un SAV sur Twitter, proposant aujourd’hui un délai de réponse moyen de 2 mn à ses interlocuteurs. 

Elle a également participé avec succès à la première journée de l’emploi #VotreJob le 24 février dernier, dans la continuité de sa stratégie de recrutement de jeunes talents. Outre l’animation de communautés d’intérêt sur la plateforme (@WeAreTennisfr, @WeLoveCinemafr), BNP Paribas a développé de nouveaux services, adaptés au caractère temps réel et global de la plateforme, comme le Fil des experts Bourse (#FilDesExpertsBourse) lancé en avril 2014, sur lequel six experts des produits de bourse décryptent quotidiennement l’actualité économique et financière, ou l’opération #MaPubIci, qui offre notamment à des entrepreneurs innovants, clients de la Banque en France, une visibilité mondiale sur Twitter.

 

***

L’accord de collaboration avec Facebook est signé par Max Jadot, Directeur Général de BNP Paribas Fortis.

Il permettra au groupe de renforcer son expertise dans le domaine du digital social et mobile, et de bénéficier d’une plateforme de communication internationale forte de 1,44 milliards d’utilisateurs actifs. Grâce à ce rapprochement, le groupe BNP Paribas proposera à ses clients et prospects des solutions innovantes toujours plus en phase avec leurs usages, dans un contexte d’utilisation croissante du mobile et des réseaux sociaux. L’objectif est de prolonger l’exemple de certaines filiales, telles que TEB en Turquie, qui propose l’ouverture d’un compte sur Facebook et des services basés sur de nouvelles segmentations de clients. Facebook est également un formidable terrain pour amplifier l’engagement et la fidélité de nos publics autour des territoires de marque de la banque (en particulier le tennis, le cinéma et l’innovation).

BNP Paribas a été la première banque en France à lancer un SAV sur Facebook, en 2009. Aujourd’hui, BNP Paribas compte 3.6 millions de fans sur Facebook. Avec We are Tennis, BNP Paribas anime la 1ère communauté autour du tennis sur Facebook avec 1,1 million de fans dans le monde.

***

L’accord de collaboration avec LinkedIn est signé par Yves Martrenchar, Directeur des Ressources Humaines du Groupe et Pierre Berlin, Directeur des Ventes EMEA, Talent Solutions, de LinkedIn.

Pour BNP Paribas, la collaboration avec LinkedIn permet d’aller au-delà de l’offre LinkedIn Talent Solutions pour recruter des talents et promouvoir la marque employeur, afin d’accélérer sa présence dans le B2B en intégrant les activités marketing et de vente de LinkedIn : LinkedIn Marketing Solutions et LinkedIn Sales Solutions. Au niveau du marketing, il s’agira d’atteindre et de communiquer avec des cibles BtoB et de construire un engagement fort avec les clients de la banque sur ce réseau professionnel. Et au niveau des ventes, de permettre aux commerciaux de commencer à utiliser le ‘social selling’ comme un nouveau moyen pour aller chercher des prospects et clients.

Les pages de BNP Paribas sur LinkedIn comptent plus de 430 000 followers.

 

***

Ces partenariats s’inscrivent dans l’écosystème d’open innovation de BNP Paribas dont la vision consiste à s’appuyer sur une démarche partenariale avec tous les acteurs du monde digital, qu’ils soient de grands acteurs du numérique, des développeurs de la FinTech ou des start-up. Alors que les partenariats noués aujourd’hui marquent une étape importante dans l’accélération digitale de BNP Paribas, les start up houses existent depuis 2012. La banque a par ailleurs initié en juin dernier le premier Hackathon international dans cinq pays en simultané.

La technologie est au cœur du plan de développement du Groupe et soutient une conviction forte : la transformation digitale sera structurante pour l’avenir de la banque. Cela se traduit par une accélération de l’investissement dans ce domaine et surtout des révolutions dans la relation client. Le principal défi consiste à offrir aux clients l‘expérience bancaire digitale avec tout le choix et la souplesse que cela implique, tout en assurant la sécurité de leurs opérations et de leurs données.

 

A propos de BNP Paribas

BNP Paribas a une présence dans 75 pays avec plus de 185 000 collaborateurs, dont près de  145 000 en Europe. Le Groupe détient des positions clés dans ses deux grands domaines d’activité : Retail Banking & Services (comprenant Domestic Markets et International Financial Services)  et Corporate & Institutional Banking. En Europe, le Groupe a quatre marchés domestiques (la Belgique, la France, l’Italie et le Luxembourg) et BNP Paribas Personal Finance est numéro un du crédit aux particuliers. BNP Paribas développe également son modèle intégré de banque de détail dans les pays du bassin méditerranéen, en Turquie, en Europe de l’Est et a un réseau important dans l’Ouest des Etats-Unis. Dans ses activités Corporate & Institutional Banking et International Financial Services, BNP Paribas bénéficie d’un leadership en Europe, d’une forte présence dans les Amériques, ainsi que d’un dispositif solide et en forte croissance en Asie-Pacifique.

Contact(s) presse:

Malka Nusynowicz              (+33) 1 42 98 36 25                        malka.nusynowicz@bnparibas.com

Anne-Sophie Trémouille     (+33) 1 58 16 84 99                        anne-sophie.tremouille@bnparibas.com

Loubna Sebti                      (+33) 1 40 14 66 28                        loubna.sebti@bnparibas.com

Suivez nous sur Twitter : @Bnpparibas_pr

 

Comment AXA a utilisé le jeu Ingress de Google pour amener du trafic dans ses agences

Comment AXA a utilisé le jeu Ingress de Google pour amener du trafic dans ses agences.

ublié le 08/07/2015 par Xavier Foucaud

Dans une récente campagne, AXA a transformé ses agences à travers le monde en éléments d’Ingress, jeu vidéo de Google qui se déroule dans le monde réel. Retour en chiffres et avec l’interview du CEO de Google Niantic Labs, créateur du jeu.

Comment AXA a utilisé le jeu Ingress de Google pour amener du trafic dans ses agences

Fin 2014, AXA a investi Ingressun jeu de réalité virtuelle développé par Niantic Labs, une filiale de Google. Fondée par John Hanke (retrouvez son interview en page 2), précédemment à la tête de de l’équipe Google Geo (Google Maps et Google Earth), Niantic Labs a pour mission de créer des applications qui poussent à l’exploration, à l’interaction sociale, et inspire des aventures dans le monde réel.

C’est le cas d’Ingress, jeu vidéo sur mobile en réalité augmentée, disponible sur Android et iOS, qui réunit 12 millions de joueurs dans 200 pays. Dans cet univers virtuel, deux équipes s’affrontent : la Résistance et les Illuminés, autour d’un scénario : l’apparition sur Terre d’une matière extraterrestre susceptible d’améliorer l’esprit humain.

Mais Ingress, s’il se joue sur son smartphone, se déroule bien dans le monde réel. En effet, grâce à Google Maps et à la technologie GPS, les joueurs doivent trouver les “portails” les plus proches, endroits-clés dissimulés derrière de vrais lieux, tels que des monuments, des statues, des fresques murales, des bâtiments… Leur mission : prendre le contrôle du “portail”, pour leur équipe, et ainsi élargir leur territoire.

En décembre 2014, AXA s’est associée à Google Niantic Labs pour transformer ses agences commerciales à travers le monde en “portails” dans Ingress, et en prendre le contrôle dans le jeu. AXA a également créé et mis à disposition des joueurs des “boucliers AXA”, objets virtuels aux couleurs de la marque. Plus de 5 millions de ces objets ont été déployés dans le jeu. Pour Frédéric Tardy, directeur marketing d’AXA, “la présence de notre marque dans Ingress est un pas supplémentaire pour la digitalisation de notre groupe, mais aussi une nouvelle façon pour nos clients de découvrir notre marque et nos agences“.

Publicité

Du trafic in store grâce au jeu virtuel

En 5 mois, plus de 600.000 joueurs d’Ingress se sont rendus dans le monde réel dans les agences AXA marquées comme “portails” dans le jeu, et plus de 4 millions de joueurs ont été exposés à la marque. De leur côté, les agences AXA transformées en “portails” virtuels ont généré plus de 3 millions d’actions au sein du jeu vidéo. L’expérience s’est également poursuivie en dehors du jeu, puisque des représentants de la marque ont interagi avec plus de 55.000 joueurs d’Ingress aux cours des différentes “Anomalies“, des rencontres live régulières organisées entre joueurs pour parcourir la ville à plusieurs.

Présentation du jeu Ingress en vidéo :

 

Apple and Twitter and Snapchat use human editors, but Facebook doesn’t – Fortune

Apple and Twitter and Snapchat use human editors, but Facebook doesn’t – Fortune.

Using human beings to do curation or aggregation works for some purposes, but not for others.

It’s gone from one or two examples to a bona fide trend—which, as any journalist knows, occurs whenever there is least three of something. The trend in this case is the hiring of human editors to filter through the news, music, and other forms of content that are being produced and/or hosted by a variety of platforms. So Apple is hiring editors for its News app, which it announced at its recent developer conference, as well as editor/DJs for the streaming music service the company is rolling out soon.

Meanwhile, Snapchat is also hiringjournalists to report and edit content related to the upcoming U.S. election, and Twitter is looking to add editorswho can filter and aggregate tweets and links related to trending topics on the network, as part of what the company calls Project Lightning. LinkedIn also recently announced it is adding human editors to its Pulse news-recommendation feature, and Instagram has started doing some curation for its new Explore page.

There are a couple of big names missing from this list that are pretty influential when it comes to news: Namely, Facebook and Google. Facebook is launching a new featurecalled Instant Articles with partners like the New York Times, but the site’s staff won’t have anything to do with the selection of stories that become part of the program—and the choice of who sees them and when will be left to Facebook’s all-powerful algorithm. Much like Facebook, Google’s services are also powered completely by algorithms.

Of course, algorithms aren’t autonomous robots, but software that is written and programmed by human beings to have certain attributes. So in a sense, the “humans vs. algorithms” debate is based on a misconception. But it’s probably fair to say the human input in an algorithm-driven model is one step removed from the action, compared to human editing.

So if Apple and Twitter and Snapchat and LinkedIn see the value of having human editors selecting news or curating content of various kinds, why wouldn’t Facebook and Google do the same? Because each of the latter two companies are involved in content that’s on a completely different scale than Apple or Twitter—and human beings don’t scale very well.

Technology analyst Ben Thompson made this point in a recent blog post, entitled “Curation and Algorithms.”There are some things that human curation is good for, and some things that it isn’t, he argues. For example, music and other emotional forms of content can be good candidates for curation because human beings perceive things about that content that algorithms might miss. So when Jimmy Iovine talked about the launch of the new Apple Music service, he said:

“The only song that matters as much as the song you’re listening to right now is the one that follows this. Picture this: you’re in a special moment, and the next song comes on… BZZZZZ, Buzzkill! It probably happened because it was programmed by an algorithm alone. Algorithms alone can’t do that emotional task. You need a human touch.”

But there are cases in which curation done by human beings simply doesn’t work, Thompson says—and Google and Facebook are two examples of that, but for very different reasons. Google’s job is to filter through all of the billions of webpages and content on the web and find the one thing that a user needs or wants to find, and that’s a task that would be impossible for even a gigantic group of human editors to accomplish (although Google does use small teams of humans to check link quality). That’s why Yahoo stopped trying to run a human-edited directory.

Facebook, by contrast, isn’t trying to filter all of the world’s information—or at least, not yet. It’s trying to find the right combination of text and photos and links and video that will appeal to every one of its billions of users, and get them to engage with the site as much as possible. So unlike Google, the supply of information it is trying to filter may not be infinite, but the personalization of that content for each of its users involves so many permutations and combinations that it would also be almost impossible to accomplish with a staff of human editors, even a large one.

“Google is seeking the single best answer to a direct query from an effectively infinite number of data points… For most queries there is one right answer that Google will return to anyone who searches for the term in question. In short, the data set is infinite (which means no human is capable of doing the job), but the target is finite. Facebook, on the other hand, creates a unique news feed for all of its 1.44 billion users… what is infinite are the number of targets.”

The news, by contrast, is something where human editors can perform a fairly useful function, and even add things that algorithms can’t, Thompson says (which is one reason why Techmeme founder Gabe Riverastopped using only algorithms to power his news portal in 2008, and started hiring human beings). The pool of information isn’t infinite, as it is with Google, but neither is the personalization required for the potential audience, as it is with Facebook. That’s why newspapers existed.

As Thompson notes, however, the risk is that human-edited services face—rightly or wrongly—much more criticism when they make decisions about what to show and what not to show than algorithm-powered networks. So Facebook and Google can to some extent argue that they don’t control what gets displayed directly, it’s just the algorithm (although there are a lot of problems with this defense, obviously).

If Apple’s human editors remove news stories about specific topics, there’s going to be a lot of negative attention. What journalistic considerations—if any—do platforms like Apple and Snapchat and Twitter have when it comes to the news? As distribution shifts to these large-scale networks, those kinds of questions are going to become even more important.

GAFA: The Future Of Amazon, Apple, Facebook And Google – Forbes (Steve Dening)

The Future Of Amazon, Apple, Facebook And Google – Forbes.

In one of the most energetic and entertaining presentations I’ve seen in a while, Scott Galloway, Clinical Professor of Marketing, NYU Stern, Founder & CEO of L2, business intelligence firm serving prestige brands. spoke in Munich about “The Four Horsemen of the digital economy“: Amazon, Apple, Facebook and Google.

Galloway starts out like a whirlwind, declaring that he has 90 slides and 900 seconds and wisely warns listeners to fast their seatbelts. He and his team at NYU Stern have developed an algorithm that looks at more than 800 data points across four dimensions—site, digital marketing, social and mobile—and across 11 geographies. They applied this algorithm against 1,300 brands, thus providing the basis for predicting winners and losers. They see themselves as “trainspotters.”

Galloway argues that it’s as important to talk about the losers in this fast-moving marketplace as much as the winners. Galloway declares two winners—Apple and Facebook—and two losers, Amazon and Google. By “winners,” he means companies that will increase in influence and value. Losers are those that will decrease in influence and value. His valuation is relative: any of these giants could lose for the next ten years and still be terribly important. They are all, he says, “amazing companies.” He points out that these four firms are so dominant that their combined market cap is greater than the GDP of South Korea (US $1.3 trillion). They have a market cap of $5 million per employee.

Galloway’s winners: Apple and Facebook

Apple is a winner for Galloway. It is dominant both on-line and in stores. It’s vertical and global. Its future is strong in part because it is becoming a global luxury brand. That, he says, is good thing because rich people all around the world like the same things. Apple has all the elements to make a luxury brand work: craftsmanship, an iconic founder, exceptional price point, expanding margins, vertical control of distribution, and globally recognizable. It’s on the way to becoming the world’s largest luxury brand with the help of former CEOs of Burberry and Yves Saint Laurent, Angela Ahrendts and Paul Deneve. Apple is completing its transition to luxury with the iWatch, predicted to have more sales than any other watch company in 2015. Some apercus from his talk:

“The expensive watch that I wear has nothing to do with telling the time. It signifies that I am more likely to look after your offspring than someone wearing a Swatch watch.”

“There are three things we do in business. Help people survive (head). Help the ability to love (heart). Help your desire to bear offspring (propagation). As you move down the torso, the margins get better and the business gets better. Luxury is in the business of propagation.”

“Tesla is not an environmental car. It’s a man’s attempt to tell people he can afford a $120,000 car.”

“Women pay $600 for ergonomically impossible shoes to try to solicit inbound offers from men who buy such cars.”

Facebook, says Galloway, is the platform people of all ages spend the most time on. Reports of Facebook’s decline in popularity among young people are “hogwash.” It is also doing well in Europe with around 90% share of social. Facebook has the ability to track users by their identity, something only Google is able to match (through Gmail). It successfully pulled a bait-and-switch by convincing brands to invest in building Facebook communities, and then charged for access. Galloway applauds the acquisitions of Instagram and Whatsapp, as Instagram is growing faster than any other social platform in the world, except WeChat.

“The primary drivers in social are mobile and images.”

“Facebook is pulling away. The world of social is becoming ‘Facebook and the seven dwarfs.’”

“Facebook has relationships with 2.4 billion users. The Roman Catholic Church 1.2 billion. Facebook has more relationships on the planet than God.”

Galloway’s losers: Amazon and Google

Galloway sees two major flaws at Amazon. One is that Amazon is single-channel retail. Galloway believes that the future lies in multi-channel retail. He says single-channel retail will disappear, whether it’s pure e-commerce or brick-and-mortar without an online presence. Apercus:

“Amazon cannot survive as a pure-play retailer.”

“Stores are the new black in the world of e-commerce. We have discovered these incredibly robust flexible warehouses called ‘stores.’”

Amazon’s growth has slowed, as brick-and-mortar stores have begun matching prices and providing instant pickup. He announces the funeral of e-commerce companies like Fab.com, Gilt, and Net-a-porter. For Galloway, the winner will be Macy’s, which has successfully gone online, and e-commerce players like Rent the Runway and Warby Parker that are opening up stores.

The other flaw at Amazon is shipping costs. According to Galloway, in 2014, Amazon received $3.1 billion in shipping fees and spent $6.6 billion on delivery. This, he says, is unsustainable. Some apercus:

“Free shipping is a race to the bottom.”

“Uber will be the most disruptive force in American retail. Drivers from firms like Uber are going to disrupt Amazon.”

“Drive-through pickup points have exploded in France from 1,000 to 3,000 in just the last year.”

“Retailers are not sitting around like passive prey, waiting to be disrupted. The retailer of the future is Macy’s. Macy’s is a metaphor for what’s happening the economy. It is closing stores and investing in on-line. $40k-80k sales jobs are being replaced by $20k-$40k factory and fulfilment jobs. There are some fantastic jobs at the high end, but the real employment growth is at the low end.”

“The smart-phone economy is going to be wonderful for employment, but terrible for wages.”

Google has several flaws, according Galloway. First, although Google is dominant in search, other brands are cutting into Google’s share. Facebook now has 1 billion searches compared to Google’s 3 billion. Second, two-thirds of product high-value searches—product searches–are happening on Amazon. Third, Google has yet to master mobile in the same way it mastered computer search. Fourth, Google had major failures in Google Glass and Google+, As a result of all these factors, Google’s revenue growth is slowing down. Apercus:

“Google + is dead already.” It has had a “98% decline in engagement rate, year-over-year.”

“Google Glass is a prophylactic that ensures that you won’t conceive a child because no one will ever go near you.”

What Galloway may have gotten wrong

Galloway says that he hopes that most of what he says is right, but he knows that some of it is wrong. Let’s look at where he might be wrong.

Galloway may be too quick to write off Amazon. If having physical stores becomes key, Amazon could easily solve it, as Galloway himself predicts, by acquiring of a brick-and mortar chain. And the issue of Amazon’s shipping costs should not be looked at in isolation from the overall shopping experience at Amazon. If “free” shipping for shoppers who subscribe to Amazon Prime makes Amazon the primary search destination of most shoppers and so trump Google search in this high-value search arena, the cost of “free shipping” may be a smart investment, both cheaper and more effective than, say, buying advertising for the Amazon brand. Just as Tim Cook declared that he “doesn’t care about the bloody ROI” of individual business activities, what matters is the overall contribution to the customer experience.

Galloway’s commends Apple for its journey towards becoming a luxury brand raises questions. Yet in the past, Apple has succeeded by producing products that are simple, easy, elegant, useful and affordable. Straying into the field of $10,000 watches is taking Apple into the domain of the useless and the unaffordable. The gains from this excursion are likely to be small in relation to the scale of Apple’s gargantuan business, while also being a distraction from what have been the keys to Apple’s remarkable success from delighting a huge number of customers with products that are low-cost to produce. Apple’s continued exponential growth ultimately depends on producing products that will make most people’s lives truly simpler and better. It’s not obvious that luxury objects like a $10,000 iWatch, even once its current obvious flaws, like limited battery life and annoying alerts, are solved, is part of that future of making many people’s lives better..

Facebook has so far done a remarkable job of mastering mobile. Facebook’s knowledge about its users’ behavior is a big advantage. Facebook ad re-targeting works across multiple devices without dependency on third-party cookies that expire or get deleted. These are great strengths. So far, Facebook has been able to live with the contradiction of a business that appears to offer the personal and the social, while behind the scenes it is ruthlessly exploiting users’ personal information for commercial purposes. Facebook says it doesn’t pass this information on to advertisers, thereby eliminating liability for privacy protection. One has to wonder how long this contradiction can be maintained and remain acceptable, as users experience the creepiness of a commercial “Big Brother” listening in on personal conversations and immediately deluging those users with ads about subjects they discussed in conversations they thought were private.

Google has enjoyed remarkable financial success. Yet anecdotal evidence suggests that Google has become hard to do business with, as a result of a certain arrogance in dealing with business partners. This may indicate that it is becoming that worrying creature, “the highly-successful process-driven company.” A process-driven company has short-term commercial advantages. With a leading share in its market, minimal thinking is required to continue on that path. Few mistakes are made. It is efficient. Its optimized processes were a good fit for its existing market. But efficiency can trump flexibility. When the market shifts due to new technology or competitors or business models, the finely tuned processes become a prison. Now that Google’s market has shifted, will Google be able to adapt quickly? Or has it become a prisoner of its existing processes? If process adherence is the overriding value system, Galloway may be right and Google may grind steadily into irrelevance. If Google can recover the focus on delighting customers that made it successful in the first place, it may go on to even greater success.

Google turned millions of public photos into timelapses showing how Earth changes

This is a brilliant way to use the millions of free public domain images that are just sitting around.

Researchers at the University of Washington and Google created more than 10,000 timelapsevideos using millions of free photos available online.

source: http://grail.cs.washington.edu/projects/timelapse/

Time-lapse Mining from Internet PhotosRicardo Martin-Brualla1     David Gallup2     Steven M. Seitz1,2
1University of Washington     2Google Inc.
The team analyzed 86 million photos from social sites, including Flickr and Picasa, and grouped them into landmarks. Then they sorted them by date and “warped” individual photos onto one viewpoint, retouched them a little, and created a stop-motion video showing how a particular landmark has changed over time.

The videos were stitched together from completely unrelated photos, taken by different people, but they don’t look all that different from conventional timelapses. They do, however, reveal processes that would be hard to capture with a single camera, such as seeping water affecting a sculpture or waterfall streams emerging and drying up.

Le partage social dope les ventes en ligne

Le partage social dope les ventes en ligne.

Tout est dans le titre ou presque : le partage de contenus sur les réseaux sociaux booste le e-commerce. Selon une étude conduite par AddShoppers, un internaute américain adepte de Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest et tant d’autres dépenseraient en moyenne 8,2% plus qu’un visiteur “non-engagé” sur des plateformes sociales. Inutile de préciser que les chiffres présentés ici diffèrent d’un site à l’autre. Facebook est évidemment le réseau plus efficace du fait de son nombre élevé d’utilisateurs. Le site de Mark Zuckerberg entraine des revenus dans 69,10% des cas, devant Twitter à 12,11% et Pinterest à 7,73%.

Pour faire simple, les acheteurs qui cliquent sur une publication liée à un site de vente en ligne dépensent 126,12 dollars sur une période de trente jours. Les autres acheteurs, qui ne passent pas par les réseaux sociaux, consomment un peu moins ; soit 116,55 dollars sur une même période. Pour cette étude, AddShoppers a analysé les achats d’internautes provenant de mail, de Facebook, de Twitter, de Google+ ou de réseaux sociaux à vocation commerciale comme Polyvore et Wanelo.

Il n’y a rien de magique dans l’utilisation des réseaux sociaux. Pour en arriver à ce genre de résultats, 10 000 sites de e-commerce ont été analysés. En fonction des situations, du marché et surtout de la clientèle, de grosses différences existent. On découvre ainsi qu’un courriel peut générer 12,41 dollars d’achats supplémentaires tandis que Pinterest ne génère que 0,67 dollar. Google+ lui peut rapporter en moyenne 5,62 dollars, là où un tweet a seulement une valeur de 1,03 dollar. Attention, il ne s’agit pas de coter tel ou tel service pour en connaître son poids en terme de revenus créés. La part de Facebook est par exemple évaluée à 0,80 dollar par acte de consommation, seulement voilà, Facebook est le réseau social le plus utilisé. Ce dernier a donc un impact des plus important.

Plus de trafic. Plus de clics. Plus de dépenses.

Dans un premier temps, les réseaux sociaux sont à l’origine d’une augmentation du trafic. Logique ! Viennent ensuite les ventes. Pour bien comprendre les chiffres présentés ici, il est important pour les boutiques et les marques de comprendre ce qu’implique le partage social. Sur Facebook, il est possible de partager de l’information et/ou des produits. Là, un “like” n’équivaut pas à un partage. Ce dernier a un taux de conversion 5,4 fois plus fort. La vente de produits ou de services en ligne ne s’acquiert donc pas si facilement. Les boutons sociaux sont les outils de base pour permettre aux clients de promouvoir à leur tour des produits. L’acheteur devient annonceur et c’est toujours le vendeur qui rafle la mise. Une fois dans un flux Facebook ou Twitter, le contenu partagé gagne en visibilité ce qui le rend logiquement plus attrayant aux yeux des autres internautes, qui peuvent à leur tour le partager via d’autres boutons…

Enfin, le rapport constate que chaque fois qu’un consommateur partage un produit sur Facebook, il en résulte un taux de clics moyen de 1,1. Les autres réseaux sociaux sont en dessous du social network avec : 0,98 clic pour StumbleUpon, 0,97 clic pour Twitter, 0,94 clic pour Wanelo et 0,87 clic pour Pinterest.

42% of Organic Search Visits Now Coming Via Mobile Devices (US)

According to the Digital Marketing Report Q4 2014, a quarterly digital marketing analysis produced by search marketing agency Merkle|RKG, mobile devices are now delivering 42% of the organic search traffic across the three major search engines: Google, Yahoo and Bing.

The report also notes that mobile organic traffic grew 54% in the fourth quarter of 2014 from the same time period one year ago.  In addition, more than half (52%) of all visits to social media sites are from mobile devices(smart phones and tablets).

To anyone paying attention to consumer habits these days, this should come as no surprise.  Nor should it be any surprise that you are missing out on a big chunk of traffic for your website if you don’t optimize it for mobile.

Here are some more reasons you need to go mobile with your online marketing presence:

Mobile users are different.  Mobile users want information in quick, digestible bites so your mobile design should match how they will be using your site.  For more law firms, it is essential to provide an easy way to contact you — a click-to-call button that the user needs to merely tap to initiate a phone call.  You want to include essential information only on your mobile site, and keep the design simple.  Good load speed is critical — 57% of mobile users will abandon your site if they have to wait three seconds for it to load, according to research by Strangeloop Networks.

SEO.  Search engines are now penalizing sites that are not optimized for mobile, so you could see your search rankings suffer if you don’t have a mobile site that works on iOS and Android platforms (smart phones and tablets).

Lead conversion.  Mobile users are much more inclined to take action than desktop users, so your calls-to-action should be highly conspicuous on your mobile site.  If you are using email marketing for lead conversion, realize that 26% of all email is opened on a mobile phone and 11% is opened on a tablet.

Engagement.  Mobile users accessing a standard website will not engage when they have to pinch or zoom to find your content.  If you provide them with a good mobile experience, they are much more likely to return to your site later on a desktop (Google reports that 90% of people move between devices to accomplish a goal).

Loss to competition.  Google says that 41% of mobile users will go to a competitor’s site after a bad mobile experience!

9 most used Mobile Apps are offered by Facebook or Google (Nielsen Tops Apps of 2014 – US)

Tops of 2014: Digital.

From videos to banking to online shopping, digital was top of a lot of marketers’ and consumers’ minds this year. To wrap up 2014, Nielsen looked at some of the top trends in digital including the latest top U.S. smartphone apps and operating systems.

Consumers seemed to place a premium on the Internet’s social space this year, with a big portion of the top smartphone apps centered on connectivity—be it with friends, loved ones or cat videos. In fact, the app with the most year-over-year change was one designed to continue the conversation: Facebook Messenger use has risen 242% since 2013. Facebook held the No. 1 ranking as well with its social network app, which had over 118 million average unique users each month. Google Search came in second with about 90 million average unique users, followed by YouTube with 88 million average unique users.

Smartphone penetration grew from 69% at the start of 2014 to 76% of U.S. mobile subscribers by October 2014, and a majority of subscribers used Android (52%) and iOS (43%) devices to access their apps. Three percent of U.S. smartphone owners used a handset that operated on a windows phone, followed by 2% on a Blackberry.

TOP SMARTPHONE APPS OF 2014

Rank App Avg Unique Users YoY % Change
1 Facebook 118,023,000 15
2 Google Search 90,745,000 14
3 YouTube 88,342,000 26
4 Google Play 84,968,000 11
5 Google Maps 79,034,000 26
6 Gmail 72,405,000 8
7 Facebook Messenger 53,713,000 242
8 Google+ 48,385,000 78
9 Instagram 43,944,000 34
10 Music (iTunes Radio/iCloud) 42,546,000 69
Source: Nielsen. Note: The list is ranked on average unique audience, which is the average of January 2014-October 2014. The year-over-year percent change represents the unique audience of October 2014 compared to the unique audience of October 2013.

METHODOLOGY

Nielsen’s Electronic Mobile Measurement (EMM) is an observational, user-centric approach that uses passive metering technology on smartphones to track device an application usage on an opt-in convenience panel. Results are reported out through Nielsen Mobile Netview 3.0. There are approximately 5,000 panelists in the U.S. across both iOS and Android Smartphone devices. This method provides a holistic view of all activity on a smartphone as the behavior is being tracked without interruption.

Data based on Nielsen’s monthly survey of 30,000+ mobile subscribers aged 13+ in the U.S. Mobile owners are asked to identify their primary mobile handset by manufacturer and model, which are weighted to be demographically representative of mobile subscribers in the U.S. Smartphone penetration reflects all models with a high-level operating system (including Apple iOS, Android, Windows and Blackberry).

Top 3 Mobile Advertising US (2014): Google (37%) Facebook (18%) Twitter (4%)

Publicité mobile : Yahoo ! dépassera Twitter en 2016 aux Etats-Unis.

En 2014, Google trustera aux Etats-Unis plus du tiers (37,2%) des revenus publicitaires sur mobile, devant Facebook (17,62%) et, bien plus loin, Twitter (3,56%), selon une étude réalisée par eMarketer. Derrière un intouchable duo de tête, Yahoo! se positionne à quelques encâblures de Twitter, avec 3,18% des revenus pubs mobiles outre-Atlantique. A l’horizon 2016, Facebook et Twitter devraient perdre un peu de terrain, avec respectivement 33,21% et 14,64% du marché, alors que Yahoo dépasseraient cette fois Twitter (4,19% vs 3,77%).

Toujours selon l’étude eMarketer, LinkedIN devrait enregistrer aux Etats-Unis une croissance de ses revenus pubs mobiles de plus de 800% en 2014 vs 2013 quand Amazon afficherait plus de 600%, Facebook 118,4% et Twitter 111,4%. Google devrait quant à lui se « contenter » de +75,8%. Si en 2015 LinkedIN poursuivra sa progression (+111,3%), Amazon ne serait pas en reste en 2015 et 2016 (+85,1% et +62,6%) quand Facebook et Twitter montreraient un ralentissement dans la progression de ces revenus pubs mobiles.