Social Media Interactions are Changing – Here’s Why That’s Important

In a recent post, marketing expert Mark Schaefer highlighted an important trend which is probably getting far less coverage than it should.

Source: https://www.socialmediatoday.com/news/social-media-interactions-are-changing-heres-why-thats-important/513658/

Schaefer actually took it a step further than that:

“I think this graph represents one of the most significant trends in the recent history of marketing … and yet there is relatively little conversation about it. Social interaction is migrating away from the public view into private spaces.”

Social Media Interactions are Changing - Here's Why That's Important | Social Media Today

No doubt you’re at least somewhat aware of this – both Facebook Messenger and WhatsApp now have 1.3 billion users each, and both, as the chart shows, are seeing massive growth in comparison to your usual social platforms.

As social networking, as a concept, has expanded, so too have the risks and concerns with public posting. The data suggests that people are becoming more wary, more inclined to converse in smaller groups, as opposed to broadcasting everything. While the capacity to share with everyone is great, most conversations are probably better within a more refined group of friends and connections.

Even the social networks themselves have acknowledged this, and have moved to offer tools which cater to such usage – Facebook, for example, has put a bigger emphasis on groups this year, aligning with the trend towards more specific discussions, as opposed to the ‘public square’ approach.

But they’re actually going even further than that – Instagram’s been testing out a new ‘Lists’ feature which enables users to share posts and Stories with selected groups of friends only, creating a level of exclusivity and intimacy via their personal lists within the app.

Social Media Interactions are Changing - Here's Why That's Important

Instagram’s also considering splitting messages into its own separate app, further separating the public and private elements – they would only be seeking to do so if they saw a clear usage trend moving in this direction.

Facebook too is working on its own private sharing – or limited sharing – tools.

The shift is important to note, because it’s a different way of using social networks, requiring a different approach to connect with users. The main brand solution offered on this front thus far would be Messenger Bots, enabling simple, one-to-one communication, without the need for dedicated staff labor – but bots haven’t seen wide take-up as yet.

So what else should businesses do – what approach should they be taking to ensure they’re moving in line with audience trends and tapping into this new shift?

Creating more private, intimate brand connection is hard, and can easily veer into intrusive territory, but the broader impetus appears to highlight a need for more focus on brand communities, on building groups and participating in relevant conversations to help enhance your business standing, and give you a way into that more direct communication.

Content would be a key step, highlighting your expertize and willingness to provide valuable, relevant advice, but responsiveness is also critical – and that does require a dedicated human touch.

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4 predictions for conversational AI in 2018

Image Credit: Shutterstock.com / Zapp2Photo

As marketers look into 2018, they see that the conversational AI landscape is primed for increased consumer adoption. In fact, in a recent survey, nine out of 10 people said they prefer messaging directly with a brand. This year, Apple, Facebook, Google, and Amazon all leaned into messaging and conversation. In 2018, the big four will make conversational AI the main gateway to communicate with the customer.

Consumers and brand marketers will see an uptick in the following areas:

A move beyond basic bots

Words like “chatbot,” “AI,” and “machine learning” are certainly trending at the moment. For a brand, embracing emerging trends and breakthrough technologies like chatbots is imperative, but so is aligning new innovations with a strategy that drives the bottom line.

As a recent Forester report noted, “the honeymoon for enterprises naively celebrating the cure-all promises of artificial intelligence (AI) technologies is over.” In 2018, more brands will put in the hard work and utilize chatbots as a powerful way to acquire new customers and personalize the experience for every person throughout the customer journey. Chatbots designed to segment and engage customers throughout the entire conversation will drive higher metrics than bots that fail to do so.

Facebook Messenger’s Customer Chat will become a game-changer for marketers

In November 2017, Facebook Messenger launched Customer Chat, a plugin that lets businesses have Facebook Messenger conversations right on their own website. With the release of Customer Chat, brands can take advantage of their websites and acquire new customers in the growing Messenger platform for free.

Facebook Messenger Customer Chat is an opportunity for marketers because when people leave a website, it allows them to view or continue their conversation with a brand on their phone, using the Messenger app. Messenger launched in 2008 as a no-frills chat functionality but has since matured into an end-to-end communications platform, while acquiring 1.3 billion users along the way. The adoption of website and mobile integration for Messenger has paved the way for Facebook Messenger to continue its current reign as the leading enterprise chat platform.

Apple enters the enterprise

At the company’s most recent Worldwide Developer Conference, Apple gave a sneak peek into Business Chat. Apple touts Business Chat as a “powerful new way for businesses to connect with customers directly from within Messages.” As Apple states on its developer site, “Business Chat connects businesses with their customers to answer questions, schedule appointments, make payments with Apple Pay, and more.”

Apple users will be able to message a business using the Messages app after seeing a call-to-action in Siri, Maps, Safari, and Spotlight.

This decision to bring customers and businesses closer together via one of its core apps mirrors moves by Facebook Messenger. These are not iMessage chatbots, however. Apple’s intent is to facilitate person-to-person interaction through chat. Adding customer service features in iMessage increases the likelihood people will stay inside Apple instead of going to a brand’s website or a Messenger bot.

Instagram chatbots?

Another huge 1:1 for marketers could exist beyond Facebook Messenger, Apple Business Chat, Google Assistant, and Alexa. In 2018, it would be wise for Instagram to roll out a messaging feature. Instagram’s consistent growth and steady introduction of new features have made the photo-and-video-sharing network a force for leading brands. By adding chatbots, Instagram could empower brands to move beyond hearts and into commerce, customer support, and increased consumer engagement.

Jonathan Shriftman is the director of business development at Snaps, a mobile messaging service.

Six Digital Media Trends That Are Going To Shake Up Marketing Forever

Source: Six Digital Media Trends That Are Going To Shake Up Marketing Forever

Ross Simmonds is one of the best marketers, growth hackers, and businessmen we know, and he is about to give you some real gems you should pay attention too. Dig in, grab a notebook, and get this brainfood while its hot.

If you want to create a brand in the future, it’s unlikely that the exact same roadmaps used in the early 2000s are still going to be applicable. Some of the philosophies will still hold weight but many tactics are going to have been abused and no longer effective. Similar to how marketers have evolved from radio & magazines to programmatic advertising and social media as an avenue to drive results — change is coming.

Change is constant.

How’d you like to ensure that when change comes, you’re ready? How would you like to hear some of the latest media trends that are going to shake up marketing industry forever?

Well…

Luckily, today that’s exactly what I’m going to share.

Over the years, I’ve rode the waves of digital media opportunities. Whether it’s generating more than 1M views on Slideshare or helping brands grow to hundreds of thousands of followers on Instagram — I’ve leveraged and capitalized on many of the latest trends. And in this post, I’m going to sharesix digital media trends that will shake up the industry for years to come.

1) The Consumerization Of Media & Influencers

The body scrub company, Frank Body was one of the first brands to capitalize on Instagram fame. With an estimated sales of roughly $20 million ≈ Organized labor 2011 political donations

≈ Annual hurricane research funding in 2011

“>[≈ Typical endowment, liberal-arts university] in 2015 — the brand has grown rapidly thanks to influencers and the consumerization of media. A quick look at their newsfeed and Instagram search will show you models and regular people promoting the product:

Some of these posts are fans.

Some of these posts are paid shout outs.

When talking about Influencers in a recent interview with Nathan Chan the co-founders of Frank Body expressed that they paid Jen Selter, $20,000 ≈ Per capita income – Australia, 2005

“>[≈ Per capita income – Taiwan, 2005] for a product placement on Instagram & Twitter. At the time, Jen had around 6M followers on Instagram but today she has more than 8.2M followers and some believe she’s charging $50,000≈ Median US household income, 2009”>[≈ cost of Ford F-150] per Instagram post.

Here’s one of Jen’s posts featuring the brand:

Influencer marketing isn’t new.

What’s new is a shift from the people with millions followers being compensated for shout outs to people with thousands.

The influencer marketing company, Markerly recently conducted a survey of2 million social media influencers. In their study, they found that influencers with fewer than 1,000 followers had a higher like rate than those between1,000 and 10,000 followers. While it’s possible that these individuals low engagement is related to Instagram’s algorithm and inactive followers — the idea that almost anyone could be considered an influencer is valid.

Today, millions of dollars are being exchanged for shoutouts on Instagram, Snapchat takeovers and retweets on Twitter. As more and more people begin to create mini-brands and followings, it can be expected that more people will monetize their reach and compete with media companies for their budget as it relates to digital marketing.

According to TheShelf, brands are quickly committing to this investment:

Sites like BuySellShoutOuts.com offer brands the ability to pay influencers with all accounts sizes and covering differenttopics to promote their brands:

But this is just the beginning.

Thunderclap is a social media platform that allows people to sign up in advance and share a unified message at a specific time. Many brands have already started using this tool to drive buzz around events, non-profits and products raising money on Kickstarter. In October 2015, a project called Phonebloks generated a reach of more than 381,745,40 with supporters likeElijah Wood signing up for the campaign.

Examples of campaigns that people signed up for

Users of Thunderclap don’t currently get compensated for their tweets but I’m willing to bet, it’s coming. The willingness to offer brands the ability to tweet on your behalf isn’t new. It’s something that has been tried by many companies over the years but the trends surrounding influencers and the markets understanding of the value is an indication that this is a trend worth watching.

2) Bots Are A Media Opportunity For Brands

One of the first media companies to launch a bot was the team at Quartz. The team launched an app that feels like a friend sharing news via SMS that you read with ease. It comes with gifs, emojis, articles and of course ads like the Mini Clubman banner you see on the left.

Bots have been a hot topic for the last few months but when Facebook announced during f8 that messenger boasts 900 million users per month and it was launching a bot marketplace — it became a new ball game.

Facebook is betting on bots.

As more bots are developed we will begin seeing different more use cases. Whether it’s bots being used for the news or bots being used for shopping; the ability to connect with people through a conversational interface is an opportunity that media companies and marketers should watch.

Native content and advertising is a trend that has been soaring over the last few years. Native or Sponsored content is a model in which brands pay to have their content distributed (sometimes created) by media companies directly into their channels in a way that is often viewed as regular editorial.

Here’s an example of native content from Delete Blood Cancer on Blavity:

So what does this have to do with bots?

Well.. Imagine you’re using a fitness app.

The bot will remind you to go for a run, offer advice for meal plans and even tell you what you should do for sciatic pain — but it will also send you an article that talks about Six Reasons Why You Should Invest In The Right Shoes. Sponsored by Adidas of course…

Native advertising has been found to consistently perform better than traditional banner ads. Brands will embrace this approach within bots because it works for both the user and the publisher. I predict we will see more media companies launching bots and more bots evolving into full-fledged media companies.

3) How Stories Will Evolve Content Consumption

Facebook changed the way we find our news.

Twitter changed the way news was broken.

Snapchat and Instagram are currently fighting to determine what’s the best way for the new generation to consume it.

The last year has been a big one for Snapchat. DJ Khaled made brands open their eyes to the network as an opportunity to reach millions. Business giants proclaimed it to be the future of TV, social media and media as a whole. The rise of Snapchat resulted in profile pictures all over Twitter & Facebook to quickly change from logos & headshots to snap codes:

Instagram was once a favourite amongst youth but Snapchat quickly became a serious threat. In fall 2015, Piper Jaffray’s survey of 6,500 US teens showedthat 33% of them considered Instagram their most important social network. By this spring, that number had fallen to 27% as Snapchat took the crown.

Fast forward a few months and the momentum of Snapchat continued when Kim Kardashian did what she does best. She broke the Internet.

When she released a phone recording of Taylor Swift and Kanye West on Snapchat, every social network felt it. Journalists, the media and fans proclaimed Kim the official queen of social media and Snapchat the future:

Moments like this, the rise of DJ Khaled and the increase in usage was a clear indicators that Snapchat found gold. So earlier this year, Instagram took and stand refusing to allow Snapchat to run away with this new format and launched their own version of Stories. Creatively, they called it…

Stories.

It shares the same functionality as Snapchat allowing users to create a rolling montage of pictures and videos from the last 24 hours. It’s in this format that brands are already advertising, media companies are being launched and millions of people are watching.

4) More Free-Time = More Media Consumption

In just a few years, the idea of autonomous vehicles have gone from a futuristic dream to a realistic and disruptive product. Regardless of who you think is going to come out as the industry leader in the race towards the first fully autonomous and safe vehicle — it’s going to have an impact on media.

According to a 2016 study conducted by the Bureau of Labor Statistics, the majority of Americans spend their free time watching TV.

Watching TV was the leisure activity that occupied the most time (2.8 hours per day), accounting for more than half of leisure time

The same trend was found in places like the UK and Canada. You see, the more free time people have the more time they spend consuming content. And if we no longer have to pay attention to the road, it’s likely that we spend more time consuming visual content.

As autonomous cars become more readily available, more time will be available for people to consume content. The average travel time to work in the United States is 25.4 minutes. Meaning that over the course of a year you could consume more than 98 episodes of The Wire.

Exactly.

5)The Rise Of Vertical Video Content

Snapchats success with vertical video content has resulted in a the rise of vertical video content. For years, people suggested that vertical video was bad and that horizontal video was good:

In a leaked Snapchat pitch deck the company shared that revenues in 2015 were $59 million. The company projected to reach between $250 million ≈ cost of Airbus A380, the largest passenger airplane

“>[≈ Typical endowment, research university] and $350 million in 2016, and between $500 million [≈ net worth of Jay-Z, rapper, 2011] and $1 billion ≈ box office sales of The Jungle Book, 1967

≈ box office sales of ET: The Extra-Terrestrial, 1982
≈ box office sales of The Exorcist, 1973
≈ box office sales of Jaws, 1975

“>[≈ net worth of J.K. Rowling, author of the Harry Potter series, 2011] in in 2017.

What’s a key differentiator between Snapchat and other networks?

It embraces the vertical video. Here’s a slide from one of their earlier decks about the success that brands were having with vertical content:

Over the last few years, we’ve seen a consistent increase in the amount of video content being consumed vertically. According to eMarketer and the 2015 Mary Meeker report, 29% of all video consumed online was vertical.

Lyrical School is a Japanese female band who made a major debut into mainstream with their latest music video. Unlike most videos that are built for TV, the group created a vertical video that has more than 1.3M views:

But this is just the beginning.

More and more companies are developing ads in the vertical video format. More and more media companies are offering it as an ad unit. It’s a trend that offers a more optimal experience for mobile users and a more effective approach for brands and media companies to connect with them.

6) Big Media Begins To Niche Down

Country Side Network

Did you know that there is a magazine for almost everything?

From sheeps and pigs to technology and boats. If it’s a topic, there has likely been a magazine created about it at some point in the last 50 years. Over time, magazine sales have continue to plummet and many of the niche magazines have been the early victims of this medium’s decline.

The writing has been on the wall for years:

As the niche magazines continue to die — niche web opportunities arise.

It’s the model that allowed Reddit to become so successful. Reddit is one community that is filled with thousands of sub-communities talking about niche interests and topics. Whether it’s an entire community talking aboutBBQ or a community talking about PokemonGo — it’s a place where passionate people can learn, connect and stay up to date on interests.

Media companies are recognizing the opportunity to niche down and are investing in more niche topics to reach niche audiences. Over the last few months, we’ve seen media companies invest in more diverse categories of media content. As a result, marketers will have the ability to be more targeted in their efforts rather than making assumptions about what content their audience is likely to consume.


Are there any other trends that you think will shake things up? Did you learn something new in this post?

Let me know in the comments, I’d love to hear your thoughts. If you want more content like this, check out my semi-regular newsletter.


Ross Simmonds is a the founder of Foundation, a content marketing service company and the co-founder of Crate + Hustle & Grind.

Google, Reddit, Spotify : l’origine méconnue des noms des grandes marques du Web

Source: Google, Reddit, Spotify : l’origine méconnue des noms des grandes marques du Web

Google, Tinder, Amazon, Snapchat… Derrière les noms de ces sites ou applications que nous utilisons au quotidien se cache des histoires, des jeux de mots hasardeux, ou de jolis brins de poésie.

“Facebook”, tout le monde sait ce que ça veut dire. C’est comme la phrase “Where is my umbrella?”, ça s’apprend au collège et ça ne s’oublie pas. Mais sur l’immense toile du Web, nous fréquentons bien d’autres sites et applications aux noms tous plus obscurs les uns que les autres : Twitter, Reddit, Tinder, Instagram, Google ou Yahoo (chacun sa religion), Amazon, sans oublier Periscope, Skype, WhatsApp, Snapchat…

VOIR AUSSI : 1996-2016 : les métamorphoses de la page d’accueil de Yahoo!

On s’est dit que vous seriez content d’en apprendre un peu plus. Et d’être en mesure de briller à votre prochain apéro dînatoire en lançant d’un ton assuré “Hey, tu sais d’où ça vient, le terme Google ?” qui captera l’attention et fera de vous la star de la soirée.

Amazon

Voilà une histoire qui aurait pu très, très mal finir. Amazon, vous vous en doutez peut-être déjà, tient son nom du fleuve Amazone. Ce n’est pas le plus long fleuve du monde, mais c’est celui avec le drainage le plus intense. C’est l’ambition du site : avoir beaucoup de commandes, de trafic sur le site, bref, de ventes.

Initialement, Jeff Bezos veut nommer son site Cadabra.com (comme dans “Abracadabra”). Problème : son avocat est un peu dur de la feuille, et entend “cadaver” (cadavre en anglais). Pas super, pour un site de e-commerce (ou pour n’importe quelle entreprise). Jeff Bezos se voit contraint de trouver un autre nom. Il attrape alors un dictionnaire, et décide de lire toutes les définitions jusqu’à trouver celle qui fait écho à son ambition professionnelle. Heureusement qu’il a commencé par la lettre ‘A’.

Google

Larry Page et Sergey Brin l’ont senti dès le début, en 1998 : ils venaient d’avoir une idée de génie, il fallait que le nom soit à la hauteur. Spoiler alert : il l’est.

Google est une version mal orthographiée du mot “googol” (“gogol” en français). Inventé par le mathématicien Edward Kasner, ce terme désigne le nombre 1 suivi de 100 zéros. Une manière pour les créateurs de signifier leur ambition : offrir un moteur de recherche à grande échelle, capable de couvrir le contenu immense du World Wide Web. Mission accomplie.

VOIR AUSSI : Internet a fêté son 10 000ème jour d’existence, ça méritait bien un hommage

Google Chrome

Google ne fait jamais les choses à moitié. Alors quand on demande “Mais pourquoi Chrome ?” à Glen Murphy, le responsable du design du navigateur de Google, l’homme a pas moins de trois réponses à donner.

Chrome était le nom que les membres du projet lui ont donné avant sa sortie. Quand il a fallu choisir le nom définitif, plus personne n’arrivait à envisager le navigateur sous un autre nom que celui-là, “Chrome”. De plus, le terme “chrome” est lié, pour beaucoup de gens, à l’idée des voitures customisées, débridées, bref : des engins rapides, comme le navigateur de Google. Enfin, dans la sphère du design informatique, “chrome” désigne tout ce qui n’est pas la page Web sur un navigateur : l’interface, la barre d’adresse, les onglets… Tout ce que l’équipe a tenté de réduire et optimiser, pour mettre l’accent sur le contenu. Leur mojo : “du contenu, pas du chrome”. Pris ironiquement, Chrome était alors le nom parfait.

Instagram

Beaucoup des noms de sites ou d’applications sont issus de l’association de deux ou plusieurs mots. C’est le cas d’Instagram. Comme ils l’expliquent sur leur site, les fondateurs Kevin Systrom et Michel Mike Krieger ont fusionné deux mots : “instant”, en rappel aux appareils photo Polaroïd qu’ils utilisaient étant jeunes, et le suffixe grec “gram” qui indique un contenu écrit ou enregistré. On le retrouve notamment dans des mots comme télégramme, phonogramme…

Mélangez le tout, et vous avez Instagram, un réseau social de partage de photos, en format carré comme nos vieux Polaroïd. Enfin un peu de poésie et de nostalgie dans ce monde de brutes.

Reddit

Vous connaissez forcément Reddit. Sinon, c’est que vous procrastinez sur un autre site, mais aucun n’est à la hauteur de cet immense forum communautaire. On y trouve le meilleur et le pire des Internets, agrémenté de jeux de mots, de memes, et de trolls s’insultant à tout va. Au milieu de tout ça, on trouve cependant des choses intéressantes, qu’on est content d’apprendre, et de répéter à son entourage.

Eh bien le nom vient de là : pour ceux qui maîtrisent un minimum la langue de Shakespeare, il suffit de prononcer ce nom à voix haute : Reddit –> Read it –> “Je l’ai lu”. Parce que si vous avez quelque chose d’intéressant à raconter, c’est que vous l’avez “read it” sur Reddit.

Shazam

Application révolutionnaire, Shazam permet de retrouver en quelques secondes le nom et l’interprète d’une chanson que l’on entend, que l’on soit au supermarché, en soirée, près de son poste de radio…

Le mot “shazam”, lui, est dans le dictionnaire anglais depuis belle lurette. C’est une exclamation que l’on prononce quand quelque chose de magique ou d’exceptionnel se produit. L’équivalent de notre “Tadaaaaaa” français. Chris Barton, l’un des créateurs de l’appli, a expliqué en 2013 que la référence lui paraissait appropriée, car “c’était le mot parfait pour un outil qui permet d’identifier la musique comme par magie.”

Snapchat

Autre association de mots anglais, Snapchat aurait initialement dû s’appeler Picaboo, le nom du petit fantôme que l’on voit sur le logo. À son lancement, l’appli ne marche pas bien. En plus, Evan Spiegal et Reggie Brown reçoivent un jour une lettre de l’entreprise d’albums photo Picaboo, qui leur demande poliment de bien vouloir changer de nom.

Ils décident alors de l’appeler Snapchat, un mélange entre “snapshot” (photo instantanée) et “chat” (discussion), qui résume assez bien le concept. Picaboo a bien fait de changer de nom, car l’application est aujourd’hui évaluée sur le marché à près de 20 milliards de dollars. Rien que ça.

Spotify

Ce mot ne veut absolument rien dire. Mais l’histoire de ce nom est emblématique du processus de création d’une start-up.

On est en 2006. Daniel Ek et Martin Lorentzon viennent de créer une entreprise, un site de streaming musical. Mais le projet n’a pas de nom. Installés dans des pièces différentes, chacun crie à l’autre des idées de noms pour leur site. “Martin m’a soudain crié quelque chose, j’ai mal entendu et compris “Spotify”. J’ai vérifié sur Google, ce terme n’était pris par personne, alors nous avons foncé”, explique Daniel Ek sur Quora.

Pour se rattraper, les deux créateurs ont ensuite trouvé que “Spotify” était la contraction de “spot” (message) et “identify” (identifier). Pas mal, mais trop tard !

Tinder

Vous pensiez que la flamme de votre application de rencontres préférée représentait l’Amour avec un grand ‘A’, du genre qui vous consume quand vous rencontrez ENFIN l’âme sœur ? Raté.

En anglais, le terme “tinder” désigne les combustibles qui brûlent rapidement : allumette, petit bois, amadou… Certes, ces matériaux peuvent servir à allumer un beau et durable feu de joie, mais le “tinder” en lui-même est vite réduit en un petit tas de cendres à peine tiède. Une métaphore on ne peut plus honnête pour cette appli qui, depuis 2012, permet à ses utilisateurs d’enchaîner les conquêtes.

 

Tender, le Tinder des gourmands (Source: O – L’Obs)

L’appli de rencontre Tinder et son célèbre geste du “swipe” (faire glisser à droite ou à gauche pour sélectionner ou éliminer) n’en finit pas d’inspirer des déclinaisons. Dernière en date : Tender, qui en lieu et place de barbus ténébreux et de blondes accortes propose des photos… de magret de canard nappé de sauce teriyaki ou degyozas dorés. Tout aussi appétissant pour les amateurs de foodporn, qui se régalent de clichés de plats alléchants sur Instagram ou ailleurs.

Comme sur Tinder, d’un simple mouvement de l’index, l’utilisateur signifie son intérêt ou son absence d’intérêt pour la photo. Dans le premier cas, il peut alors accéder à la recette du plat qui l’a fait saliver, voire à la fiche de l’auteur qui l’a publiée. Histoire de prendre contact via Twitter ou Facebook s’il s’agit d’un barbu ténébreux ou d’une blonde accorte.

Tender est téléchargeable gratuitement sur l’AppStore et Google Play