Amazon offers nationwide discount on back of Havas Meaningful Brands survey, as it launches John Lewis-style ad | The Drum

Amazon offers nationwide discount on back of Havas Meaningful Brands survey, as it launches John Lewis-style ad | The Drum.

Amazon is offering Brits a £10 discount on any order over £50 on the back of a Havas Media survey, amid wider marketing activity to promote its Prime service which kicked off over the weekend (31 July).

The results of Havas’ ‘Meaningful Brands’ global study, which involved over 20,000 people in the UK, were revealed earlier this year but only recently received wider industry recognition.

The Meaningful Brands metric was related to how consumers’ quality of life and wellbeing connects with brands at both a human and business level. Specifically, it looked at the role brands play in communities, how they impact self-esteem, healthy lifestyles, connectivity with friends and family, making lives easier, fitness and happiness as well as marketplace factors such as quality and price of goods.

Amazon topped the list in the UK, with 64 per cent of people saying they would care if the retailer disappeared. M&S and John Lewis – viewed as ‘ethical’ heritage brands – followed Amazon, with discount retailer Aldi and Sainsbury’s rounding off the top five.

To say thank you, Amazon has rolled out the £10 off promotion.

“We are grateful to customers for ranking Amazon #1 across Britain’s retailers,” said Christopher North, managing director at Amazon UK.  “You can count on us to continue working hard to set ever-higher standards for customer experience.”

The ‘BIGTHANKS’ promotion coincides with the roll out of a UK marketing campaign to bolster uptake of its Prime service.

The ad takes a different approach to previous Amazon activity, which has previously relied on consumer testimoials to woo new shoppers. Instead, the brand has followed the likes of John Lewis and Nationwide in running more emotive led creative in order to showcase what their services mean to customers rather than focus on the more funcitonal benefits.

To that end, Amazon’s latest ad follows the story of a little boy on the first day of nursery.He is showen nervously trying to fit in, as his anxious father watches through a window. His dad is then seen buying something via the Amazon mobile app, before the ad cuts to the next day when the little boy arrives at nursery wearing a superman costume.

It ends on the line: ‘Millions of ways to save the day, delivered in one day’.

Prime is Amazon’s key asset in its ambitious plan to create an ecosystem where users will spend more time and money. Over the past six-months it has ramped up its strategy to sign up new members, namely with the launch of the Prime Day last month.

Open only to Prime members, it offered discounts across thousands of goods for 24 hours. Amazon has not yet offered data on how many new members it attracted, but claims that global order growth increased 18 per cent on Prime Day versus the same day last year

IDC Predicts Turmoil For CMOs In 2015: 25% of CMOs will be replaced every year through 2018.

IDC Predicts Turmoil For CMOs In 2015.


Late last year IDC’s CMO Advisory Service released its 10 predictions for the next three years. Kathleen Schaub, vice president of the practice, summarized the findings this way, “Our theme for the coming year is turmoil versus transformation. There’s a lot of activity going on and some people are actually moving forward, but there’s also a lot of spinning and a lot of trial and error.

“We see that marking transformation is at a point where marketing people get that they’ve got to take [new] roads and these roads need new and different kinds of content. They need to start engaging with buyers earlier. They need to use data to personalize. They need technology in order to be able to accomplish that. These fundamental facts about modern marketing everyone get now. [Marketers] pretty much all tried to do this and now realize how difficult it is, how interrelated it is and how much has to change in such a fundamental way in order to be able to make this happen. There are a few places here and there that are starting to put things together, but the scary stories are coming back as often as the winning stories.”

IDC CMO FutureScape 2015 (2)

Here are IDC’s 10 predictions with my editorial comments:

  1. 25% of CMOs will be replaced every year through 2018. The big issue to me that contributes to this turnover is the redefinition of the CMO role. No longer can a CMO simply be the “brand champion” who primarily uses advertising to accomplish her goals. In the era of modern marketing, customer experiences will trump advertising campaigns. CMOs must become champions of great experiences at every step of their customers’ decision journeys. Those who rise to this new standard with thrive. Those who don’t will be in jeopardy of losing their jobs.
  2. By 2017, 25% of marketing organizations will solve critical skill gaps by deploying centers of excellence. Very similar to how CMOs dealt with the explosion of digital and social media over the past decade, scarce talent will be a centralized resource used to shore up business units’ gaps. The emergence of the chief marketing technology officer (CMTO) is one response to centralizing the competencies needed to build the data and technology infrastructure required for modern marketing.
  3. By 2017 15% of B2B companies will use more than 20 data sources to personalize a high-value customer journey. Having personalized experiences at each touch point is the holy grail of modern marketing. Creating a unified view of an individual customer requires connecting that customer’s data from every interaction system, most of which are siloed today. Having a data integration plan should be at the top of every CMO’s 2015 agenda.
  4. By 2015 one in three marketing organizations will deliver compelling content at all stages of the buyer journey. Congratulations to the third who will get there this year. But for the rest of you, what’s holding you back?
  5. In 2015 only one in five companies will retool to reach line of business buyers and outperform those selling exclusively to IT. Ouch! With more and more applications being delivered via a SaaS model, business users can procure the tools they need directly for suppliers more easily. Look at what has happened in marketing with marketing cloud applications, and in sales with products like The 80% of companies slow to adjust to this new reality will be in trouble soon.
  6. By 2017 50% of larger high-tech marketing organizations will create in-house creative services. Retailers did this long ago to produce Sunday circulars more cost-effectively. Manufacturers are trying to create efficient content production teams now. This model can work for production content, but most firms will realize hiring and keeping top creative talent will be a challenge. I expect to see a hybrid model that uses both internal production teams and outside agencies to develop the most effective portfolio of content.
  7. By 2018 20% of B2B sales teams will go “virtual,” resulting in improved pipeline conversion rates. Let’s face it, highly paid sales people don’t want to mess with prospects who aren’t ready to buy. But as customers discover and explore solutions online, they may have questions that they can’t answer independently. I’m seeing more marketing organizations create lead nurturing call centers to fill this gap. When done well, customers have better experiences and sales get a higher percentage of highly qualified buyers.
  8. By 2017 70% of B2B mobile customer apps will fail to achieve ROI because they lack customer value-add. I believe this failure happens for two reasons. First, companies believe they must have a mobile app so they rush something to market that helps them push their agendas instead of taking time to understand what the customer actually needs. Second, most companies don’t need an app. What customers really want is a mobile-optimized website (which is already connected to your back-end systems) to get the information they need whenever and wherever they want it. In 2015 I’d suggest you resist being “app happy” and instead become truly “mobile friendly.”
  9. By 2017 25% of CMOs and CIOs will have a shared roadmap for marketing technology. Why isn’t this 100% in 2015? It should be! No excuses for waiting until 2017.
  10. By 2018 20% of B2B CMOs will drive budget increases by attributing campaign results to revenue performance. Yikes! Only 20%. Sure building measurement systems isn’t easy, but the tools do exist to help you learn what works and doesn’t. For the CMOs who don’t make progress on multi-channel program attribution in 2015, re-read prediction #1. Your job will be in jeopardy.

5 Key Trends about Social Media Marketing in 2015

Social Media has cemented its hold on businesses as more and more marketers indicate that they are placing a high value on it and are wanting to master social tactics that effectively engage their audience. The past year has seen an increase in Social Media Marketing through countless studies, practices, industry trends and even some major acquisitions in the space. However, the exciting possibilities are yet to come as Facebook and Twitter announce potential “buy” buttons that help drive an even more personalized experience to consumers. Trends such as paid amplification, content directed to new wearable tech, native advertising are just some of the examples of what’s to come in 2015.

With the wide variety of trends ready to launch in 2015, we decided to reach out to experts and get their predictions for Social Media in the upcoming year.

Which single digital marketing technique do you think will make the biggest commercial impact for you in 2015?

Content marketing topped the poll for the third-year running and in fact was even further ahead compared to previous years since mobile marketing and social media marketing have declined in importance as marketers have implemented these changes. It’s close for second, third and fourth position.  It’s significant that ‘Big Data’ is still in second position although the hype has receded. This shows the potential for companies to implement more data-driven marketing techniques in 2015, which will likely be closely related to marketing automation which is in third place.


Digital marketing trends 2015 survey

By 2018, 25% of CMOs and CIOs will have a shared road map for marketing technology

FRAMINGHAM, Mass.: IDC Reveals CMO / Customer Experience Predictions for 2015 | Business Wire | Rock Hill Herald Online.

The predictions from the IDC FutureScape for CMO/Customer Experience are:

1. 25% of high-tech Chief Marketing Officers (CMOs) will be replaced every year through 2018.

2. By 2017, 25% of marketing organizations will solve critical skill gaps by deploying centers of excellence.

3. By 2017, 15% of B2B companies will use more than 20 data sources to personalize a high-value customer journey.

4. By 2018, one in three marketing organizations will deliver compelling content to all stages of the buyer’s journey.

5. In 2015, only one in five companies will retool to reach line of business (LOB) buyers and outperform those selling exclusively to IT.

6. By 2016, 50% of large high-tech marketing organizations will create in-house agencies.

7. By 2018, 20% of B2B sales teams will go “virtual,” resulting in improved pipeline conversion rates.

8. By 2017, 70% of B2B mobile customer apps will fail to achieve ROI because they lack customer value add.

9. By 2018, 25% of CMOs and CIOs will have a shared road map for marketing technology.

10. By 2018, 20% of B2B CMOs will drive budget increases by attributing campaign results to revenue performance.

“CMOs must overcome the gravitational pull from the past, now. The tools of disruption, such as cloud-based marketing technology, predictive analytics, content marketing, and social media, are marching towards mainstream. IDC is confident that these ten decision imperatives pinpoint the nerve center of the marketing disruption. They represent opportunities for CMOs who are willing to step up to the next stage of leadership. Right focus will ensure that all the hard work will result in true transformation, and not just turmoil,” said Kathleen Schaub, Vice President with IDC’s CMO Advisory Service.


The State Of Digital Marketing In 2015: #Data #automation #fraud #personalization #dco (


by columnist James Green

The digital marketing industry is experiencing a major transformation.

The current state of digital is directly tied to data. Data are everywhere, informing marketers about audience interests, consumer intent, and device activity.

As mobile use continues to increase and media is progressively being bought programmatically, consumers expect a seamless and entertaining online experience.

With marketers and their agencies well underway with planning for the year ahead, here are a few trends that likely will be top of mind in 2015.

1. Big Data Will Become Bigger

Companies are sitting on massive amounts of analytics related to sales, purchase history, search activity, site interactions and more.

While this data is valuable, any single data point taken in isolation can give you a very warped view of the customer.

Linking data together and leveraging a historical trail of data points allows you to obtain bigger insights into what your customers are looking for and where they are going next.

The world of big data gives marketers the most complete obtainable customer profile, which informs audience strategies, smarter media buying and creative decisions.

Big data will only become bigger and bigger as data sources are combined.


 2. First- And Third-Party Data Will Be A Hot Topic

Within the world of big data is the combination of first and third party data sources. Brands will be retargeting customers based on their buying patterns, combining their own customer data with intent data from around the web.

Marketers want to know when their customers are in market for a good or service so that they can sell to them before they visit a website.

Incorporating data from social, location, search and site will improve the ability to attract customers at multiple stages of the consumer funnel, improving and optimizing your retargeting strategy for both prospecting and retention.

3. Automation Will Continue To Increase

Eventually, all media buying will become automated.

The swapping of insertion orders will be replaced by systems that seamlessly communicate with each other to reduce the duplication of work and improve accountability, measurability and efficiency.

The more interesting trend to watch will be how much media will switch to RTB. Over time, it’s likely that 100% of direct response advertising will be bought in real time; but how far up the funnel this trend will go remains to be seen.

There will always be a place for Super Bowl ads and other high-impact units on high-impact sites. However, these ads will be bought where there’s a large audience and will not be based on individuals, so they won’t be bought through RTB.

That said, over time, more and more advertising is going to be bought in real time, even TV.

4. Ad Fraud Will Still Be A Concern

Ad fraud won’t be much more than a blip on the road to RTB dominance. There are many companies and organizations fighting it.

Fraud, or suspicious activity as it’s sometimes euphemistically called, is simply a duplication of what happened to search at the turn of the century.

Search was easier to control because there was really only one provider (Google), and they fought it directly.

Now, fraud is recognized to be 5-10% of all search clicks. Display fraud is more complicated because of the large number of players in the space: publishers, ad servers, Supply Side Providers (SSPs), Demand Side Providers (DSPs), ad exchanges and other intermediaries.

As of now, there are a myriad of providers that can help, and only the reckless few don’t use these tools to avoid fraudulent activity.

Unfortunately, there will never be a real “crackdown” on fraudsters because these players are based in countries where these activities are not necessarily illegal. So, chasing them down seems unlikely to happen.

5. The Need For Personalized Advertising Will Grow

The opportunities for personalized advertising will continue to grow as the adoption of apps, location based advertising and dynamic creative optimization (DCO) increases.

There are so many data elements available to advertisers, enabling them to transform generic advertising into relevant marketing in real time, regardless of their device and location.

We will see this trend continue into 2015, as purchase, product level and search activity are used to predict consumer intent and therefore, inform which ad to show, and when, as well as what creative elements should be optimized within the ad itself.

In 2014 we witnessed new platforms, channels and technologies that led to major shifts in the industry and positioned data as the main ingredient for finding, reaching and engaging customers.

The biggest theme of 2015 will be “big data” as we see data sources coming together to create meaningful 360-degree customer views and actionable analytics that inform and even transform your marketing strategy.


What will happen with marketing technology in 2015? – Chief Marketing Technologist

What will happen with marketing technology in 2015? – Chief Marketing Technologist.


Extract of:

So here are 7 not-quite-predictions that I believe about marketing technology in 2015:

#1. Marketing technologists will multiply. Whatever label you want to put on them, the number of technical professionals working in the service of marketing is clearly on the rise. I’m hearing the term “marketing technologist” used more frequently, and I expect that it will gain more traction in the year ahead. Where will these previously nonexistent marketing technologists come from? Many will migrate from IT, where a subset of those professionals are eager to apply their technical talents in the pursuit of more exciting, customer-facing innovations that are recognized as driving revenue, not merely containing expense.

#2. The marketing technology landscape will grow, not shrink. Yes, there will continue to be big deals that feed the counter-narrative of consolidation. For instance, if Microsoft does fulfill my prediction, that will be a consolidation. However, the number of new entrants will continue to outpace the number of exits (happy or otherwise). As Neeraj Agrawal of Battery Ventures said in his Q&A with me, we’re just in the 4th inning of the game. There’s moneyThere’s opportunityAnd it’s never been easier to create software in the cloud.

I can make a promise — stronger than a prediction — that the 2015 version of my marketing technology landscape will have more companies represented than 2014. And yet it still will be woefully incomplete.

The next three factors, however, will make this incrementally more manageable.

#3. The ISV ecosystems around major platforms will flourish. 2014 was a remarkable year for the public support that many of the major enterprise marketing cloud providers — Adobe, IBM, Marketo, Oracle, — gave to their ISV communities. Marketo recently celebratedover 400 third-parties officially in their LaunchPoint ecosystem. The message: one company can’t do it all. I believe these platform strategies will accelerate in the year ahead, and they will make it easier to find and integrate the right capabilities from a very large field of more specialized vendors. I expect that we’ll also see some impressive innovations in the depth of these plug-and-play integrations — they’ll fit into a platform’s user interface and data services features much more seamlessly.

#4. The adoption of “marketing middleware” will increase. Tag management systems, data management platforms (DMPs), customer data platforms (CDPs), cloud app connectors, enterprise service buses (ESBs), etc., have all had a terrific year and are poised for more growth in 2015. These software solutions provide a layer of marketing data management that spans many different systems. When implemented well, they make heterogeneous marketing stacksmore manageable — which also enables brands to avoid being cornered by a single vendor. Greater IT talent applied to marketing technology management will help proliferate these more advanced and adaptable architectures.

#5. The line between software vendors and service providers will blur. Everyone in the marketing technology field should read Software vs. Services: Is There Really A Difference byMartin Kihn of Gartner. This is so spot-on. And with Publicis’s pending acquisition of SapientNitro, the stakes for the major agency holding companies to embrace this blurring have ratcheted up considerably.

Having reflected on marketing-as-a-service (MaaS) since my debate (in the comments) about itwith Gerry Murray from IDC last month, I think he’s right: it’s going to be a major channel for marketing software. But not just for the big marketing clouds. This will be a tremendous channel for innovative and niche marketing applications — including specialized software programs, everything from custom algorithms to cross-system “glue,” that will be developed by those service providers themselves to create non-commoditized competitive advantages.

Those last three — ISV ecosystems, middleware, as software/service convergence — all help make a rich and diverse landscape of marketing software more accessible to marketers who don’t want to get bogged down in a bunch of complex integrations themselves. Effectively, they can now offload that technical effort to vendors, middleware architectures, and service providers. It begins to turn the vast scale of the landscape from a bug into a feature.

#6. Several big companies will become new entrants in the marketing tech space. Dell’s entrance is the most recent example. I’ve already made my prediction for Microsoft. Other classic tech giants that I would keep an eye on include Cisco, Citrix, Intel, Intuit, and Xerox. I also believe that Amazon, Facebook, Google, LinkedIn, and Twitter will significantly expand their software offerings to marketers — LinkedIn’s acquisition of Bizo is Exhibit A — which will start to impact the competitive dynamics with marketing clouds from the “traditional” enterprise software companies.

#7. All of marketing technology will be hot — but some categories will be really hot. 2014 was the year of content marketing and predictive analytics, which will remain big. Next year, I think we’ll see five other categories gain traction. Four of them — sales enablement, post-sale customer marketing, marketing finance, and marketing talent management — are all about hybridization between marketing and other departments: sales, customer service, finance, and HR, respectively. The fifth will be innovations related to the Internet of Things (IoT). Yes, I can’t but help cringe a bit when I say that, as I know there’s a lot of hype around IoT. But the reality is that with ubiquitous connectivity and device proliferation, the field of hybridized online/offline experiences is almost — almost — ready to blossom.

Actually, I believe there’s also a sixth category that will be on fire in 2015 — interactive content. I feel a little sheepish saying that because, well, my company, ion interactive, offers interactive content marketing software (you can read the story of our pivot here). So you could certainly argue this is my “hope” more than a prediction. But, if you’ll indulge me for a moment, it’s evident that content marketing is becoming a victim of its own success: the noise of passive content (the world-wide web of white papers and webinars!) is deafening, steadily reducing its efficacy in engaging and educating prospects. Interactive content changes the rules of that game, by letting marketers produce more permanent customer experiences instead of just more transient customer communications. And it’s not just me. I’ve been seeing a lot of new competitors emerge in the category. There’s going to be some really interesting innovations around interactive content in 2015. In keeping with the hybrid theme of the other five categories, think of this as the hybridization of communications and experiences.

Aislelabs Engage: analyser le comportement des consommateurs dans le magasin physique et au sein des sites et applications (Instore retargeting via mobile)

Le regargeting en magasin fait décoller le marché du marketing mobile-%post_id%.

Les acteurs de l’ad tech et les marketeurs commencent à réaliser l’importance du marketing digital in-store et surtout du lien qu’il est nécessaire de faire entre le magasin physique et les applications et sites mobiles, un maillon encore faible de la chaîne malgré son importance. Un exemple très récent de cette prise de conscience est le partenariat que la plateforme de publicité programmatique SiteScout vient de signer avec AisleLabs, un spécialiste du retargeting in-store.

Le retargeting in-store est une façon un peu grossière d’appeler le retargeting qui permet aux annonceurs de communiquer avec leurs clients et prospects pendant et après qu’ils soient passés dans le magasin.

L’outil Aislelabs Engage permet d’analyser à la fois le comportement des consommateurs dans le magasin physique et au sein des sites et applications en ligne. Se servant des technologies Wifi, GPS et notamment iBeacon – qui identifie où l’internaute se trouve dans le magasin au rayon près – AisleLabs permet aux marketeurs d’envoyer des messages personnalisés à ces cibles. L’outil fournit une analyse sur les profils des visiteurs, segmentés en fonction de leurs différents comportements de recherche et d’achat.

Suite à ce partenariat, un commerçant utilisant Aislelabs Engage avec son application mobile, par exemple, pourra mieux comprendre le comportement de son client dans le magasin et utiliser la plateforme RTB de SiteScout pour le recibler sur Internet, dans son smartphone ou tablette, ou sur les réseaux sociaux comme Facebook.

« Notre vision a toujours été de connecter le comportement du consommateur en ligne et dans le monde physique. A travers cette nouvelle offre avec SiteScout, nous sommes encore plus près de rendre cette idée réalité. Le concept de recibler les visiteurs d’un magasin physique, une fois qu’ils sont en ligne, vient combler une lacune dans le marché », affirme Nick Koudas, co-fondateur et CEO d’AisleLabs.

– See more at:

Marketing Executives: Digital Media Spend Will Overtake Traditional by 2016 – BWWGeeksWorld

Marketing Executives: Digital Media Spend Will Overtake Traditional by 2016 – BWWGeeksWorld.

CINCINNATI, April 22, 2014 /PRNewswire/  More than half of marketing executives expect to spend more on digital media than traditional channels within the next two years, according to a survey from marketing mix optimization solution providerThinkVine.

A quarter of senior-level marketers say that their spending in online display, social, mobile and other digital channels currently exceeds spending on TV, radio, print and other traditional media. Another 31 percent believe their digital budgets will overtake their traditional spend within the next two years.

The ThinkVine survey polled 200 CMOs, marketing vice presidents and directors at companies with less than $100 million[≈ Large city office building] to more than $10 billion [≈ Chernobyl costs, USD at the time] in revenue about their marketing budgets and spending projections.  Most marketers said they are confident that digital spending will eventually exceed traditional spending, with only 3 percent of respondents saying the shift will never happen.

While the trend to digital media is accelerating, ThinkVine CEO Mark Battaglia said brands shouldn’t go “all in” on digital marketing now until they have the information they need to understand the sales impact of that spend.

“Marketers shouldn’t blindly follow the crowd,” he said. “Consumers in general spend more time with digital media, but it’s important for each brand to know how their specific customers consume media and how different media types work together to achieve sales and brand objectives. Companies can’t take a one-size-fits-all approach to their marketing mix.”

The survey found that an additional 15 percent of marketers anticipate investing more in digital than traditional channels this year and 16 percent of this group expects the shift to happen next year. Another 24 percent think digital will exceed traditional in two to five years, and 8 percent say it will happen in five years or more. Just 11 percent don’t expect digital to surpass traditional in the foreseeable future.

Other findings from the survey include:

  • The insurance, entertainment, finance and technology industries are leading the way in digital adoption. At least35 percent of marketers from these industries report that they already dedicate half or more of their budget to digital (40 percent for insurance, 38 percent for entertainment, 36 percent for finance and 35 percent for technology).
  • Thirty-six percent of companies with $1 billion [≈ box office sales of The Exorcist, 1973] or more in revenue have already seen digital spending outpace traditional or expect to see the shift within the next year. By contrast, 9 percent of companies with less than $100 million [≈ Large city office building] in revenue don’t expect this shift to occur.
  • Depending on the channel, one-fifth to one-quarter of marketers said that their ability to determine historic ROI by channel for digital display, search, social media and mobile was “excellent.” By contrast, one-third rated their ability as either “fair” or “poor.”


“The survey results show that most marketers are moving budgets to digital channels before they have all the information they’d like to have,” said Battaglia. “They told us that they rely more on factors like experience, perceived current performance, and historical spending and trends than tracking and model-driven analytics. As a result, there is still an opportunity for marketers to improve results and gain a competitive advantage by using data and analytics in new ways across the marketing mix.”

A full report on the survey results will be published in May. For more information, visit

About ThinkVine

ThinkVine Marketing Mix Optimization software provides marketers with data-driven, forward-looking insights to hone their marketing mix and improve return on investment. Designed for B2C marketers, ThinkVine’s solution delivers a 28 percent average increase in marketing-driven sales by enabling better strategic decisions about tactics, timing and spending levels across all segments. Combining historical, category, demographic and media consumption data, ThinkVine creates a custom, virtual marketplace that simulates how targeted consumers will respond to combinations of marketing activities over time. The ThinkVine software delivers rich historical insights and better short- and long-term forecasts of ROI and sales, as well as support for an agile, objective ongoing planning process – all with 98 percent accuracy. More information on the software is available

SOURCE ThinkVine