Can Today’s Banks Become the ‘Bank of the Future’?

While the banking industry understands the need to more digital, considerable changes will be required in order to make this a reality.

Source: Can Today’s Banks Become the ‘Bank of the Future’?

As the consumer is becoming more digital, the banking industry is being transformed. Consumers are becoming accustomed to instant communication, one click service and real-time contextuality. This comes at a time of increased competition. A study looks at how global bankers are responding to these increased expectations.

Now more than ever, banking needs to step out of its collective comfort zone, digitizing and diversifying in response to the changing consumer. While branches aren’t vanishing as quickly as some predicted, banking can no longer follow branch-centric models. Instead, the ‘Bank of the Future’ represents an omni-channel, client-centric, self-directed digital model that many banking executives admit may be beyond their scope.

A report from Oracle titled, “Banking is Changing … With or Without the Banks,” surveyed more than 100 executives at major retail banking institutions globally, which revealed a desire amongst banks to invest in digital strategies … but also stark differences in progress.

According to the report, digitization of the entire banking organization is viewed as the primary enabler of banks’ business objectives. Regardless of whether the focus is increasing revenues or profitability, decreasing costs or meeting regulatory guidelines, digitization is seen as a central investment priority.


Overall, 94% of banking executives interviewed say that having a digitized omni-channel customer engagement strategy is important to their future success, with 37% admitting that future success of their business is ‘entirely dependent’ on digital customer engagements. Despite the recognition that digital technology initiatives are urgently needed, 88% told Oracle they see significant challenges in moving toward digitization.

The Fintech Challenge

Every publication talks about the transformation of banking and that today’s retail banking competitive landscape is far removed from what existed a decade ago. Much of this change has been highlighted by the rising influence of new digital competitors that are impacting all levels of banking.

“No longer do retail banks simply vie for customers against other retail banks. Instead, we are witnessing an influx of new, tech-savvy, digital competitors – FinTechs – all eager for a piece of this lucrative financial pie,” the report said.

The foundation of these changes is caused by changing consumer demographics and expectations. “The world’s largest demographic, born after 1980, are now millennials. These customers have grown up in the era of Facebook and Amazon; an era of instant communication, one-click purchases and 24 hour delivery. If a supplier can’t provide a service, they don’t wait – they find someone else who can,” says the report.

More than half believe that both private label banks, alternative payment providers and even credit card providers will be major competitive threats – a greater percentage than are worried about other traditional high street players.


The Digital Delivery Gap

The banking industry is not standing still as these changes in expectation and competitors occur. Most organizations recognize that digital customer engagement is the way to respond to the changes in the industry. Key services that are among the most important to adopt, as noted by the respondents in the report, include mobile payments and real time data synchronization, spend analytics and even digital advisory services.

Despite all being recognized as important by over 80% of banks, there appears to be a failure to commit to delivery of these services, with only 24% providing real-time synchronization, 19% providing location-driven services and only 30% currently providing real-time analytics. In other words, the gap between importance and ‘ability to deliver’ is more than 60% for three of these capabilities. And while the importance of providing mobile payments is viewed as the most important component of digital engagement, the gap in capabilities is still 50%.

Oracle believes one of the reasons for the lag in delivery of digital capabilities is the comfort of current relationships. While these relationships served banking well in the past, banking needs to change their underlying processes to accept these new forms of data specially in the content of real-time digital processing.


“Omni-channel customer engagement is not a ‘bolt-on’ product that can simply be added to existing systems to give a little bit more functionality”, says the study. “It needs to take a fresh perspective – wiping the established ‘offline’ board clean and asking ‘how should we be doing this in a digital world’?”

Unfortunately, only 23% are currently approaching omni-channel customer engagement with a fresh, digital mindset. Instead, a ‘bolt-on’ approach is how the majority of retail banks (77%) are approaching digital channel engagement, either replicating offline banking capabilities online, or adding a small amount of additional functionality. Change is happening however.

For instance, while 74% of banking organizations aren’t yet able to facilitate the digital on-boarding of customers currently, within the next two years this figure is expected to drop to 24%.


Challenge to Digitalization

Why are so many banks yet to develop a real-time, digital customer engagement offering when there is an acknowledgment of the importance of this capability? The key challenge lies in legacy systems, with nearly all banks (89%) mentioning the challenge of overcoming their legacy systems as a barrier against omni-channel engagement. The high cost of implementation (89%) and lack of suitable technology (75%) were also seen as hindering efforts to become truly digitized.


Beyond the innovation and investment needed to change legacy systems, Oracle blames the banking industry’s defensive mindsets, with banks focusing on preventing customer defection, complying with legislation and reducing the cost base, rather than actively seeking growth and improvement. Currently, retention of customers is prioritized above revenue as the key impetus to digitization, with 83% claiming customer loss as a prime motivator.

Is Delivering the ‘Bank of the Future’ Possible?

The banking model for the future will be customer-centric as opposed to being driven by products and services. This model will enable an information-driven and value centric relationship as opposed to being based on the bank’s needs. While 48% of the banks believe that customers in the future will want to use a bank where tasks can be completed in real-time across multiple synchronized digital and offline channels, there is only a limited belief that the industry will be able to live up to this challenge.

Nearly one third believe that most banks will be operating with disconnected digital channels in five years with 22% believing that most banks will have failed to adopt digital at all. The discrepancy between what banks think customers’ will want, and what the market will be able to deliver, is greatest in North America and the European markets, but no more than one third of banks in any region believe that banking will be able to provide truly synchronized, digital omnichannel banking within five years.


According to Oracle, “Failing to meet customers’ expectations is dangerous in any industry; it could be lethal in an environment where the competitive landscape is becoming ever-more congested.” While there is clarity of what is expected by the consumer, there is definitely less assuredness if banking will be able to keep pace with expectations given the level of investment and commitment required.

It’s time for virtual assistants: Operator & M (Facebook)

Operator: Your next shopping experience starts with a text

Operator wants to “unlock the 90% of commerce that’s not on the Internet”, CEO Robin Chan tells me. After two years in stealth, Chan was finally willing to give TechCrunch a peek at his startup, which he sees as the convergence of the biggest themes in tech: mobile, messaging, and the on-demand economy.

Operator calls itself a “Request Network”. It’s an app that uses a network of human ‘Operators‘ to fulfill customer requests. It can handle a broad range of commercial requests. For now it’s focused on “high-consideration” purchases that may require expertise or have lots of options to choose from.

Mr Camp co-founded Uber along with Travis Kalanick. Operator does not have any formal agreements in place with the ride-hailing app, but is closely watching the development of UberEverything, Uber’s logistics and delivery service, as a potential partner.

The upcoming holiday season is poised to be the first big test of digital concierge services as consumers turn to Christmas shopping or make reservations. A challenge for traditional mobile commerce has been getting customers to complete the purchase — users often find it too time-consuming or inconvenient to input their credit card number into a webpage on their smartphone, for example — and digital concierges are trying to change this

Facebook’s new virtual assistant for Messenger, M, is pretty darn impressive.

It can arrange to have flowers delivered. It can warn you that it’s likely to rain. It can snag you hard-to-find tickets to the upcoming “Star Wars” movie.

At this point, M can do pretty much everything an actual human assistant might be able to do, short of picking up your dry cleaning. (Although it could arrange to have it delivered!) That’s great news for Facebook. The company is rolling out M as a way to keep people using Messenger and, eventually, get them shopping inside of it. An assistant to make that easier will certainly grease the skids on those efforts.

But there’s actually a simple reason for why M is so advanced. For the most part, M is much more human than it is software. Or rather, it’s powered by actual humans much more than it is by software.

The artificial intelligence technology used to power M is still in a very early stage, which means that while the system is learning some of the basic responses for popular requests, human moderators handle the bulk of the interactions with actual users, according to Facebook’s chief technology officer Mike Schroepfer.

“It’s primarily powered by people,” Schroepfer explained. “But those people are effectively backed up by AIs. The idea here is, you can ask it any question, not just the set of questions that it’s capable of. The thing that’s cool about this is it gives us a much wider training set, like what are the things people actually want it to help them [with].”


In other words, making it human-powered versus machine-powered allows Facebook to get a more authentic glimpse at how people want to use the product.

Right now, Facebook is training M with supervised learning, a process where the computer learns by example from what human trainers teach it. If a user asks A, you respond B. Eventually, the idea is that M will know enough to operate without a human handler. Facebook has a team of people building neural networks — applications that help machines think and act like humans — and many of those applications are already live inside of M, Schroepfer says.

That doesn’t mean that M will fly solo any time soon. The feature is only available to a small group of beta testers in Silicon Valley, and the technology needs to become much less human-dependent before Facebook passes it out more broadly, Schroepfer said.

“The reason this is exciting is it’s scalable,” he added. “We cannot afford to hire operators for the entire world to be their personal assistant.”

Schroepfer also showed off a new tool Facebook is building that can actually describe what’s in a photo, and vocalize it through a verbal Q&A process with a user. So, if you asked Facebook what was in a picture, it could — without ever having seen the picture before — respond correctly, based on other photos it has seen. This tech hasn’t rolled out to users yet, but Schroepfer hopes that someday it will.

These efforts are part of a much broader push from Facebook to dive into artificial intelligence and deep learning as a way to personalize its service. It has one of the world’s top deep learning experts, Yann LeCun, running its AI division; the eight-person team from machine-learning startup, which Facebook acquired in January, is running M. The company won’t say how many operators it’s using for M, but BuzzFeed found that Facebook is using outside services like TaskRabbit to complete some of the requests.

#Infographie : Les applis mobiles, premier investissement des entreprises en marketing digital – Maddyness

#Infographie : Les applis mobiles, premier investissement des entreprises en marketing digital – Maddyness.

La dernière étude réalisée par Val­tech et Adobe auprès de plus de 300 directeurs et responsables marketing dresse un état des lieux des logiques d’investissements et des grands enjeux du marketing digital en 2015. Retour sur l’infographie qui dessine les tendances digitales de ces derniers mois.

Depuis quatre ans, Valtech et Adobe cherchent à retranscrire les préoccupations et les attentes des directions marketing, tout en identifiant les postes d’investissement des prochains mois dans un baromètre du marketing digital. Autant d’informations nécessaires pour dresser le panorama d’un écosystème qui évolue rapidement.

L’enquête, menée auprès plus de 300 directeurs et responsables marketing d’entreprises de toutes tailles confirme une tendance forte : les applications mobiles constituent le premier poste d’investissement devant l’e-commerce, le brand et content management, le social media et le data marketing. Autre information : la part du marketing digital gagne 3% entre 2014 et 2015 dans le budget marketing global.

Côté indicateurs, les clics semblent (pour 181 d’entre eux) importer plus que le nombre de visites (169) ou encore la conversion (155). Les initiatives mobiles mises en place concernent pour 41 des répondants le responsive design, les applications mobiles (32) et les sites mobile (27). Quant au parcours cross canal, il sera principalement optimisé grâce à des e-mailings performants et à des sms qualitatifs, principaux leviers d’acquisition, devant la publicité et le SEO.

Qui tient les rênes de l’investissement en marketing digital ? Le marketing se hisse à la première place du classement (50%) devant le digital (35%) et l’IT (15%).  La data récoltée est quant à elle majoritairement utilisée pour améliorer la connaissance client, pour mieux cibler et segmenter son audience et enfin pour mieux personnaliser ses communications.

« Ce baromètre confirme nos observations sur le terrain : la complexification croissante du digital s’accompagne d’une volonté de plus en plus importante de la part des marques de mieux le comprendre et de l’intégrer à leur stratégie globale. L’augmentation du ROI des stratégies digitales, et notamment des stratégies mobiles, nous renseigne quant à l’évolution des budgets marketing globaux en faveur du digital », développe Christophe Marée, Directeur Marketing Digital chez Adobe.

barometre marketing digital

Les résultats complets de cette étude sont disponibles sur le site de Valtech

Who should own the customer journey? | (Econsultancy: Understanding the Customer Journey: More Than Just Online)

Who should own the customer journey? | Econsultancy.

Published 4 May, 2015 by David Moth @ Econsultancy

David Moth is Social Media Manager at Econsultancy. You can follow him on Twitter or connect via Google+ and LinkedIn

All marketers know that managing and optimising the customer journey is important, but who is in charge of it at your organisation?

Does anyone own the customer journey? And if not, who should take responsibility?

Success is very much dependent on getting this right by defining clear governance, roles and responsibilities, and ensuring there is a high degree of collaboration internally.

This is one of the themes investigated in our new report, Understanding the Customer Journey: More Than Just Online, published in association with ResponseTap.

The research shows that companies are five times more likely to identify marketers as being in the driving seat than any other teams, such as customer insight, sales or customer support.

Agencies are even more likely to point to marketers, with nearly three in five (58%) saying that customer journey ownership falls under their remit.

Which single department is primarily responsible for owning the customer journey within your / your clients’ organisation(s)?

It’s a group effort

Though marketers generally take responsibility for the customer journey, it’s obviously not a solo effort.

When it comes to contributing to an organisation’s understanding of the customer journey, behind marketing (70%) there’s a fairly even split between the other teams, with customer service support (43%), sales (42%) and analytics (39%) being among the biggest contributors.

Perhaps unsurprisingly, for B2B respondents, sales is the second most likely department to contribute to this.

Which business departments within your / your clients’ organisation(s) contribute to your understanding of the customer journey?

More often than not, organisations are fraught with a myopic culture: it’s all about optimising individual touchpoints and not the end-to-end experience.

Having this rather narrow focus sometimes distorts reality to the point that companies think they are delivering an outstanding experience when customers actually see it as mediocre at best.

Only by getting cross-functional teams together to identify pain points and come up with solutions as a group can organisations drive change.

Multichannel journey

The research shows that digital marketing and ecommerce teams are twice as likely to drive initiatives aimed at understanding the customer journey as their traditional or offline counterparts.

In an ideal world this would be more of a collaborative effort, but that’s clearly not the case as less than a third (31%) of responding organisations indicated that there’s an even mixture between the two.

Delving deeper into the data revealed that digital-focused respondents (either exclusively or mainly) are significantly more likely to say that digital teams are chiefly responsible for optimising customer journeys – 66% and 49% respectively compared to only 12% of those who are not focused on digital.

Which part of your business (or your clients’ businesses) is chiefly responsible for driving initiatives aimed at understanding the customer journey?

Common barriers

According to a McKinsey report, the number of digital touchpoints on the path to purchase is increasing by a fifth annually.

It stands to reason, therefore, that just over a third of company respondents (35%) cited the complexity of CX/number of touchpoints as a key barrier to understanding the customer journey.

Silos are also a common problem, both in terms of disparate data sets (32%) and the organisational structure (28%).

What are the greatest barriers preventing your organisation (or your clients) from gaining a better understanding of the customer journey?


Ubisoft voit ses ventes sur mobile décoller au premier trimestre |

Ubisoft voit ses ventes sur mobile décoller au premier trimestre |

Les jeux pour terminaux mobiles commencent à représenter une part non négligeable des revenus d’Ubisoft. La firme a publié un chiffre d’affaires de 96,6 millions d’euros sur le premier trimestre de l’année fiscale 2015-2016, clos le 30 juin dernier. Il était de 809,7 millions d’euros au troisième trimestre de son exercice fiscal précédent. Un ralentissement anticipé par l’éditeur, qui prévoyait un chiffre d’affaires de 80 millions d’euros ce trimestre.

Certes, la Playstation 4 et les jeux  pour PC restent les deux principales sources de revenus de l’éditeur. Elles représentent respectivement 27% et 23% des recettes de la société d’origine bretonne. Toutefois, les ventes de jeux pour mobile et de produits dérivés ont fortement augmenté en un an. Elles représentent 14% du chiffre d’affaires de l’entreprise sur le premier trimestre de l’année fiscale en cours, contre seulement 1% un an plus tôt. Ces jeux pour mobiles et produits dérivés représentent une part plus importante de revenus générés que la Playstation 3 (11%), la Xbox 360 (11%), la Xbox One (11%) ou encore les Wii (3%).

Rayman Adventures sur mobile prévu pour l’automne

La firme a déjà sorti deux épisodes de Rayman adaptés aux smartphones et aux tablettes. Elle en prévoit d’en sortir un troisième cet automne, Rayman Adventures, développé par le studio Ubisoft de Montpellier. Ce jeu fonctionnera sous iOS et Android.

Ubisoft voit ses ventes sur mobile décoller au premier trimestre |

Ubisoft a mis l’accent sur les jeux pour mobiles depuis 2012. La société a décliné Assassin’s Creed et Prince of Persia par exemple. Auparavant l’éditeur avait laissé à la société Gameloft, dirigée par l’un des frères du pDG d’Ubisoft Yves Guillemot, le soin de développer ses jeux pour ce type de terminaux. Le modèle économique freemium est le plus courant, bien que de nouveaux modèle économiques soient testés. Au final, le segment digital représente 54,1 millions d’euros, soit 56% du chiffre d’affaires sur le premier trimestre 2015-2016, contre 23,2% l’année dernière.

Les jeux Ubisoft sont distribués dans 55 pays à travers le monde et la firme dispose de filiales dans 28 pays. Elle emploie environ 8 400 personnes. Son siège est situé à Montreuil en banlieue parisienne. Elle prévoit un chiffre d’affaires d’environ 90 millions d’euros au deuxième trimestre de l’année fiscale 2015-2016. Pour l’exercice annuel, Ubisoft prévoit un résultat opérationnel d’au moins 200 millions d’euros.

En savoir plus sur

Mary Meeker’s Internet report 2015: Mobile commands 24 percent of time spent with media but accounts for only 8 percent of ad dollars spent

One of the most-watched digital reports of the year is out—Mary Meeker’s Internet Trends—and it shows just how much room mobile advertising has to grow. Meeker runs digital investments for top Silicon Valley venture capital firm, Kleiner Perkins Caufield and Byers, and every year she releases a comprehensive breakdownof the entire Web landscape.

Meeker looks at how people around the world use the Internet, how many are on mobile, how they spend their time online, and which companies and industries stand to gain the most.

Here’s what you should be focused on this year in digital and on mobile:

  1. Mobile Internet use is growing faster than Internet usage in general: There are 2.8 billion Internet users, up 8 percent from 2014, and 2.1 billion mobile Internet users, an increase of 23 percent.
  2. Mobile data usage rose 69 percent last year, and 55 percent of mobile data traffic is from video.
  3. In 2008, Americans spent 20 minutes a day on average with the mobile Web. This year, they spend close to three hours, more time than they spend on laptops.
  4. The mobile ad industry is still short $25 billion. Mobile commands 24 percent of time spent with media but accounts for only 8 percent of ad dollars spent.
  5. Facebook and Twitter are growing but not like they used to. Revenue per user and monthly user growth is slowing. Facebook revenue per user is at $9.36, up 29 percent over last year, but growth neared 60 percent last year. Year-over-year user growth was 13 percent last quarter, the slowest growth ever.
  6. Twitter revenue per user was $5.14, an increase of 45 percent over last year, whereas growth was 80 percent last year at this time. User growth was 18 percent, down from 25 percent a year ago.
  7. The mobile ad industry as a whole grew 34 percent year over year, while desktop digital advertising only grew 11 percent.
  8. Mobile ads are getting more motion but in short bursts. There are four new styles of ad: Pinterest’s Cinematic Pins, Vessel 5-second video ads, Facebook Carousel ads, Google Local Inventory Ads.
  9. Buy buttons equal optimized for mobile, and they have popped up across Google, Facebook and Twitter.
  10. Vertical screens and vertical content are a big deal now with 29 percent of people’s daily screen time spent looking at smartphones. Five years ago, time spent in front of such vertical-oriented screens was only 5 percent of overall viewing time.
  11. Snapchat is all about vertical ads and says users watch them until the end nine times more frequently than they watch horizontal ads in its app.
  12. Snapchat now has 100 million daily active users, and the app generates 2 billion video views a day. One event like Coachella can draw 40 million video views to Snapchat Live Stories.
  13. Facebook gets 4 billion video views a day, 75 percent of which are from phones.
  14. Pinterest is getting manlier with the number of men’s fashion pins up almost 100 percent over a year ago—car and motorcycle pins were up 120 percent.
  15. Watching video games like it’s TV is becoming a top entertainment choice. Video game streaming site Twitch has 100 million monthly users now, an increase of or 122 percent.
  16. Twitch can draw 1 million viewers at the same time.
  17. Teens continue to be trendsetters. The five most important social networks for U.S. teens, in order, are Instagram, Twitter, Facebook, Snapchat and Tumblr.
  18. E-commerce is starting to pick up, with $300 billion in spending last year representing 9 percent of retail sales. E-sales accounted for less than 1 percent of retail revenue in 1998.
  19. Alibaba, China’s e-commerce giant, has more than $350 billion worth of merchandise on its platform. Amazon has closer to $100 billion worth.
  20. Online, on-demand platforms are growing. Airbnb, for instance, has booked 35 million guests—25 million of those were in the last year. Uber drivers are up sixfold to more than 1 million. Etsy has 1.4 million sellers, up 26 percent.
  21. The average Etsy seller makes $1,400 a year. The average Airbnb host makes $7,700 a year in New York.
  22. China is huge and can be big for content. A documentary about smog, Under the Dome, got 200 million views in three days, and 41 percent came from the messaging app WeChat.
  23. WeChat can be used for government services, too, in China, where it has 550 million users.
  24. India will be the next frontier, opening opportunities for Facebook, YouTube, Twitter, LinkedIn and Amazon.

Mobile-First Will Not Be Enough | Forrester Blogs

Mobile-First Will Not Be Enough | Forrester Blogs.

Posted by Thomas Husson on April 16, 2015

The global mobile revolution is still in its early stages! Forrester forecasts that there will be nearly 3.5 billion individual smartphone users among more than 5 billion individual mobile subscribers by 2019. Mobile will clearly be the new battleground where you must win, serve, and retain your customers globally. Mobile is no longer simply a digital channel; it is an opportunity to transform customer experiences and to invent new businesses. It will be the hub of new connected experiences in mature economies but the ultimate “converged” medium in emerging ones.

To move away from simply shrinking and squeezing their desktop PC websites and ads onto mobile, many B2C marketers have embraced the notion of “mobile-first”. They are starting to design websites and marketing campaigns with mobile in mind instead of simply retrofitting their approach to mobile. More often than not, mobile-first still implies that you consider mobile as channel. While you must design with mobile in mind and adapt your content to smaller screens, this approach won’t be enough to fully address the upcoming global mobile revolution.

Marketers must now leverage mobile to transform their customer experience and to act as a catalyst for business disruption.

■  B2C Marketers must transform the overall experience to win in customers’ mobile moments . . .Marketers must stop thinking about mobile as a goal or a strategy and start thinking about how it can help them achieve their overall marketing and business objectives. Only 14% of the companies we surveyed have started down this path, and only 4% of them have allocated the resources, budget, and organization needed to undergo their own mobile mind shift. Those that are investing in the mobile mind shift are pulling ahead.

■  . . . and prepare for business disruption as mobile “eats the world.”[i]A few companies — mostly new pure plays like Airbnb, Uber, and WeChat — are using mobile to reinvent business models within existing industries. Marketing leaders should seize the opportunity to use mobile to transform their business. Why marketing leaders? Because they are, ultimately, responsible for understanding and meeting customer needs, inventing new products and services, and delivering differentiated customer experiences.

■  B2C Marketers should use mobile as a catalyst to mature their marketing programs. B2C marketing leaders should use mobile as a way to augment their marketing in all channels, to become more agile organizations, to localize their overall marketing approach, and to drive broader organizational transformation.

Clients who want to know more about this can download our latest report “The Global Mobile Revolution Is Just Beginning

 To illustrate the disruptive power of mobile phones and how they had cannibalized several markets (such as cameras, video recorders, watches, and GPS standalone devices), Benedict Evans from Andreessen Horowitz said that “mobile is eating the world.” Source: Benedict Evans, “Presentation: mobile is eating the world,”, October 28, 2014 (…). Moving forward, Forrester believes mobile will disrupt not just product categories but entire industries, acting as a catalyst for business transformation.

Le temps passé sur mobile dépasse celui sur PC au Royaume-Uni – JDN

Le temps passé sur mobile dépasse celui sur PC au Royaume-Uni – JDN.

En 2011, un adulte britannique passait 31 minutes par jour en moyenne sur les devices mobiles (smartphone, tablette…). En 2015, il y consacrera 2 heures et 26 minutes par jour, soit 5 fois plus qu’en 2011, selon les estimations de budget temps média au UK publiées par eMarketer. Pour la première année, le temps passé sur mobile dépassera le temps passé en ligne via les ordinateurs (2h13min) qui continue de progresser légèrement (+3 minutes/an).
Le temps passé sur smartphone devrait encore gagner +17 minutes cette année et dépasser le temps dévolu au média radio (1h31min vs 1h23min). Le temps passé sur tablette a, quant à lui, dépassé en 2014 le temps consacré à la presse (37min vs 20min) et devrait atteindre 48min en 2015. La télévision devrait rester le premier média consommé, avec un temps passé quotidien de 3h12min, en recul de 2 minutes vs 2014.

Temps passé par média © eMarketer

En additionnant le temps passé par média, sans dédupliquer les phénomènes de multi-tasking, un Britannique aura, en 4 ans, consacré deux heures de plus aux médias majeurs : 9h34min en 2015 vs 7h38min en 2011.
Le cumul des médias digitaux représente désormais près de la moitié du budget temps média : 48,6% en 2015, contre moins d’un tiers en 2011 (31,7%).


Temps passé par média par jour © eMarketer

Three-fourths of the world’s mobile data traffic will be video by 2019

11 massive predictions about the future of mobile and mobile data | memeburn.

At this stage, telling anyone that we live in a mobile world seems more or less pointless. Our phones are hardwired into our daily lives and, for many of us, can seem more like artificial limbs than everyday devices. They’ve changed the world too. Web designers now think about how you’ll experience a site on a phone or tablet before they think about how you’ll see it on a desktop.

Apps meanwhile have gone from single function curiosities to powerful tools that allow us to do everything from hailing private cars to making investments on the fly.

Given that we’ve come so far since the first cellphone call was made 42 years ago, where are we likely headed to next?

Well, global networking powerhouse Cisco has lifted the cloth on its crystal ball and offered up its predictions for where mobile and mobile data are going in the next few years. And if it’s anywhere near right, then we’re in for some astonishing growth in both spaces.

1. Global mobile data traffic will increase nearly tenfold between 2014 and 2019

Mobile data traffic will grow at a compound annual growth rate (CAGR) of 57% from 2014 to 2019, reaching 24.3 exabytes per month by 2019.

Cisco Exabytes

2. By 2019 there will be nearly 1.5 mobile devices for every person on the planet

There will be 11.5 billion mobile-connected devices by 2019, including M2M modules—exceeding the world’s projected population at that time (7.6 billion).

Cisco devices

3. Mobile network connection speeds will increase more than twofold by 2019

The average mobile network connection speed (1.7 Mbps in 2014) will reach nearly 4.0 megabits per second (Mbps) by 2019. By 2016, average mobile network connection speed will surpass 2.0 Mbps.

4. By 2019, 4G will be 26% of connections, but 68% of total traffic

By 2019, a 4G connection will generate 10 times more traffic on average than a non-4G connection.

<center<Cisco 4G traffic

5. By 2019, more than half of all devices connected to the mobile network will be “smart” devices

Globally, 54% of mobile devices will be smart devices by 2019, up from 26 percent in 2014. The vast majority of mobile data traffic (97 percent) will originate from these smart devices by 2019, up from 88% in 2014.

6. By 2019, 54% of all global mobile devices could potentially be capable of connecting to an IPv6 mobile network

More than 6.2 billion devices will be IPv6-capable by 2019.

7. Nearly three-fourths of the world’s mobile data traffic will be video by 2019

Mobile video will increase 13-fold between 2014 and 2019, accounting for 72% of total mobile data traffic by the end of the forecast period.

Cisco Video

8. By 2019, mobile-connected tablets will generate nearly double the traffic generated by the entire global mobile network in 2014

The amount of mobile data traffic generated by tablets by 2019 (3.2 exabytes per month) will be 1.3 times higher than the total amount of global mobile data traffic in 2014 (2.5 exabytes per month).

9. The average smartphone will generate 4.0 GB of traffic per month by 2019

That’s a fivefold increase over the 2014 average of 819 MB per month. By 2019, aggregate smartphone traffic will be 10.5 times greater than it is today, with a CAGR of 60 percent.

10. By 2016, more than half of all traffic from mobile-connected devices (almost 14 exabytes) will be offloaded to the fixed network by means of Wi-Fi devices and femtocells each month

Without Wi-Fi and femtocell offload, total mobile data traffic would grow at a CAGR of 62 percent between 2014 and 2019, instead of the projected CAGR of 57 percent.

11. The Middle East and Africa will have the strongest mobile data traffic growth of any region with a 72% CAGR

This region will be followed by Central and Eastern Europe at 71 percent and Latin America at 59 percent.