Le paradoxe du Chief Digital Officer: le profil idéal du CDO d’aujourd’hui ressemble étrangement au profil… du CEO de demain

Le paradoxe du Chief Digital Officer.

Installer un Chief Digital Officers au sein d’un comité exécutif serait une fausse bonne idée pour Pascal Cagni, l’ancien vice-président d’Apple Europe.

Les CDO (Chief Digital Officer) semblent avoir déjà gagné la bataille du management et des comités exécutifs, où ils siègent chaque jour plus nombreux : selon le cabinet américain Gartner, 25 % des entreprises devraient avoir leur CDO d’ici à 2015.

Leur rôle ? Augmenter l’« intensité numérique » de toutes les fonctions de l’entreprise, faire passer les organisations de l’ère de la méfiance numérique à celle de la performance digitale.

Il y a urgence : toujours selon les experts de Gartner, il y a 12 ans, les dépenses consacrées au numérique étaient équivalentes à 20 % du budget des systèmes d’information géré par le directeur informatique (CIO). En 2020, ce montant devrait être équivalent à 90 % du budget IT !

Séduisante pour beaucoup, l’idée même du CDO est à mon sens l’archétype de la fausse bonne idée, à peu près aussi pertinente que la nomination d’un CEO (Chef Electricity Officer) au moment de l’invention de l’électricité.

Car le virage numérique n’est pas une option tactique mais bien un impératif stratégique. Il doit irriguer et impacter la structure même de l’entreprise et la sensibilité de tous ses dirigeants (opérationnels et fonctionnels) et de tous ses administrateurs.

En attendant le changement de génération et la prise de pouvoir, inéluctable, par les « natifs numériques » (« digital natives »), les CDO continueront donc à travailler paradoxalement à leur propre perte, en préparant avec enthousiasme, à tous les niveaux de l’entreprise, ce jour probablement pas si éloigné où le numérique ira de soi.

A moins qu’ils ne préparent leur propre triomphe ? Après tout, le profil idéal du CDO d’aujourd’hui ressemble étrangement au profil… du CEO de demain !

Pascal Cagni est administrateur de sociétés, investisseur et ancien vice-président d’Apple Europe.

 

The Seven Success Factors of Social Business Strategy [INFOGRAPHIC] | Vala Afshar

The Seven Success Factors of Social Business Strategy [INFOGRAPHIC] | Vala Afshar.

Vala Afshar

2013-07-30-57797Infographic.jpg

Houston, we have a problem – a social business strategy problem.

The era of social networking started in the early 2000s with the launch of Friendster. In fact we can argue that there were renditions of social networking even before that –from Bulletin Board Systems (BBS) to CompuServe, Prodigy, and AOL. Yet even though we have had some form of social networking since the advent of the networked ecosystem, most companies today are still challenged with successful social business transformational initiatives.

A recent survey by Altimeter of nearly 700 social media professionals yielded that:

  • Only 34% of businesses feel that their social strategy is connected to business outcomes.
  • Just 28% of companies feel that they have a holistic approach to social media, where lines of business and business functions work together under a common vision.
  • A mere 12% are confident they have a plan that looks beyond the next year.
  • Only half said that top executives were “informed, engaged and aligned with their companies’ social strategy.”


As a CMO and an active user of social media, I am stumped at how the industry still treats social as an experiment. Majority of businesses using social media today have few clear connections between their social activities and business goals. Social media metrics, if they exist, focus instead on engagement activity metrics like ‘likes’ and ‘follows’ and not the actual business value creation like revenue, brand reputation or cost reduction.

Another trait commonly observed in the industry is that most social media strategists focus solely on the external social media. What is missing is a holistic strategy that incorporates both external and internal facets and focuses on translating business objectives into socially adept interactions.

Time is now to get serious about social and this is precisely what authors and technology analysts Charlene Li and Brian Solis have addressed in their latest publication, “The Seven Success Factors of Social Business Strategy“. The e-book focuses on factors that enable executives and strategists all across to develop and execute on a holistic social business strategy.

The e-book is an easy and insightful read that provides practical advice. You will learn how to define your social strategy, gain alignment across the business, and use said strategy to support business goals. Li and Solis also focus their findings and recommendations on how to convince and rally decision makers at the executive level, with both considered practices and mistakes to avoid.

Without further ado, here are the 7 key factors that impact the success of your social business strategy.

1) Define business goals

Figure out your business objectives. It is imperative that your strategy be built around your business goals. Starting off on the right foot means defining goals up front and ensuring that stakeholders at different levels and across departments are aligned towards those goals.

The second step is to define key performance indicators (KPIs) and metrics that go beyond engagement data sets. For example, take likes, comments, re-tweets, reach, views and the alike, and map these to tangible business outcomes such as revenue generation, brand reputation and cost savings.

Bonus points for teams that can start correlating sentiment and share of voice in social media against business impact on revenue, support and retention.


2) Establish a long-term vision

There is tremendous advantage in knowing where we are going. It’s not just enough to have goals in place; you also need to have a long term vision that communicates to everyone within the organization on why this journey is taking place and the value it brings.

It is imperative to define this vision for future employees, customers, and partner relationships and social experiences that will come about as a result of this holistic strategy. It provides a direction and a purpose to every stakeholder. In order to establish a vision,social executives must understand their role in a social business.


3) Ensure executive alignment and support

Executive support is imperative to the establishment and on-going execution of a social business strategy. Social often exists in its own marketing silo. But at some point, business collaboration must extend beyond marketing or social customer care and pervasively reach throughout the entire ecosystem. When every voice is heard in the seams of the organizational fabric, you have achieved a holistic adoption of social. Executive sponsorship is necessary to do this, and to also align collaboration with tangible business objectives.

Additionally, speaking the language that matters to executives is the only way to ensuring program support, therefore allowing sustainable budget and resources to scale social within the organization. I recently wrote about the importance of social executive support.


4) Define the strategy roadmap and associated initiatives

Once you have your vision and you are in alignment on your business goals, you need a detailed plan that outlines each step required to build your social business. Ideally, it should outline the next 3 years with focus on initiatives that one can execute in a proficient manner immediately, along with prioritization based on business value.


5) Establish governance and guidelines

Develop one coherent social governance model that outlines and defines stakeholders that are responsible for the strategy, management and development of an infrastructure to support your social business strategy.

Ideally, a corporate hub is established by the social media strategist with representation from each business unit to initiate enterprise priorities, guidelines and processes along with specific roles and responsibilities. One should also invest in formation of a Social Media Center of Excellence (CoE) which ensures a systematic strategy and allows sustainable scalability across the organization.


6) Secure staff, resources and funding

The most important aspect of a successful social business strategy is talent. It is important to get the right people with the right mindset onto the core team to make this work. Determine where resources are best applied in the present and the future. Ideally, your corporate strategist and their teams should have proficient background in dealing with emergent technologies and approaches.

Think deep about your strategic relationships across your agency, vendor and partner networks. It is recommended and perfectly fine to rely on capable external partners in the initial phases when marketing efforts are being amplified and internal skills are limited.

As a CMO, I am more interested in my talent’s ability to adapt and forecast the future working models than their ability to sell me their traditional past successes. Invest in the ability to train your staff on vision, purpose and business value creation along with an appropriate metrics/reporting structure to ensure a uniform approach across the business.


7) Invest in technology platforms that evolve

Avoid the shiny object syndrome that is often seen in marketing departments all across the industry. Avoid new technologies and investment in the latest tactics prior to having a coherent and a holistic social business strategy, roadmap and alignment in place. Often times, technology choices of yesteryear don’t scale well into the future state of a social business. Smart executives and strategists always pick technology last.


One way of tackling this issue is to align with technology vendors who share their product roadmaps with you so that one can easily evaluate if they will meet your organization’s future state.

Enterprise social is often misunderstood by the masses as an easy, simple, in the moment kind of an activity. Fortunately for us, Solis and Li have done a great job in explaining the intricacies of enterprise social business and provide a heartfelt read on tackling the issues that we are all facing in this industry.

In the noisy world of social media publications, this is a refreshing and an informative read. I highly recommend that all business executives, especially CEOs, CMOs, CHROs, CCOs, and CIOs to consider reading “The Seven Success Factors of Social Business Strategy“.

Social Data. The New Driver for Marketing Strategy. | Lanoba Blog on Social Login, Sharing and Analytics

Social Data. The New Driver for Marketing Strategy. | Lanoba Blog on Social Login, Sharing and Analytics.

There is a new generation of consumer data: social data. Social data is anything and everything collected from social network profiles and behaviors i.e. sharing activity, gender, interests, birthday, etc… And since social media is here to stay, accessing this information has never been more important.

In fact, 97% of marketers surveyed by Wildfire believe that social media is an integral part of their business model and marketing strategy. However, what most companies don’t realize is that they can tap into the vast amount of data contained in the online social footprints that consumers leave behind. Utilizing this data to maximize marketing output and increase ROI is called Social Data Strategy.

The following diagram illustrates the role that social data plays in the marketing strategy process.

Lanoba Social Login Data Infographics

Social login data strategy: using social media profile data to fuel integrated marketing campaigns.

Download a PDF version of the above Infographics.

As you can see, social data provides powerful insight into the consumer. Information such as interests, location, job position, and sharing patterns provide companies with a complete view of each and every customer. This type of consumer intelligence might inspire a new product, help with the messaging of a radio campaign or simply help communicate to customers in a more meaningful way. See more examples in my blog 4 Examples of Driving Marketing Strategies with Social Login Analytics.

Andreas Weigend, Professor at Stanford University and former Chief Scientist at Amazon identifies this time as aRevolution of Social Data because it “fundamentally alters the relationship between buyers and sellers” forcing marketers to think differently. At the foundation of a social data strategy, Weigend states that a marketer must:

  1. Address each customer as an individual, not as a target.
  2. Design campaigns to encourage social sharing.
  3. Recognize how social data influences decision making, everything from how to create and sell products to   how you acquire and lose customers.

The social data era is upon us! How will you leverage it?

About Lanoba

Lanoba provides easy registration for website users by giving them the option to log in to your website via their existing social network accounts such as Facebook, LinkedIn and Twitter, among others. Lanoba captures permission-based profile & behavioral data, then aggregates, stores and presents it in powerful analytics helping drive ROI through targeted marketing campaigns.

Stop Talking About Social and Do It – Nilofer Merchant – Harvard Business Review

Stop Talking About Social and Do It – Nilofer Merchant – Harvard Business Review.

This five-part series has shared case studies and examples of how the social era affects all areas of the business model: how we create, deliver, and capture value. (See part onepart twopart three, and part four.)

Here’s a quick visual summary of what we’ve covered so far:

Nilofer-Merchant-Social-Era-in-Business.jpg

These changes are not transitory or reversible, but fundamental and irrevocable. The social-era models are inherently more fast, fluid, and flexible than the models that preceded them. The big question is: how are we actually going to do this thing?

And it is a huge question: it is a life’s work-sized-question that can’t possibly be answered in a blog post, or even a series of posts. But I can offer three actionable, thought-provoking exercises that you can start with, today:

From paid to purpose-driven. In the social era, purpose precedes scale. And as we discussed in part two of the series, shared purpose allows many communities to engage with you — without you having to invest resources in controlling their actions. When TED unleashed TEDx, they created a force multiplier. Shared purpose aligns people without coordination costs.

Purpose is also a better motivator than money. Money, while necessary, motivates neither the best people, nor the best in people. Purpose does.

Actionable exercise: Have the people you work with write down the purpose of your work, then compare answers. Then ask, are any of these purposes something that would create a multiplier effect? Engage hearts and minds?

From isolated organizations to communities. The social era will reward those organizations that understand they can create more value with communities than they can on their own. Communities of proximity, where participants share a geographic location (Craigslist is an example but co-working locations are another) will allow people to organize work differently. Communities of passion who share a common interest (photography, or food, or books) can inform new product lines. Communities of purpose will willingly share a common task to build something (like Wikipedia) that will carry your brand and its offer to another level. Communities of practice, where they share a common career or field of business, will extend your offer because it extends their expertise (likeMcAfee mavens). Communities of providence that allow people to discover connections with others (as in Facebook) and thus enable the sharing of information, products and ideas.

Actionable exercise: Imagine that if you asked, you could get communities to co-create with you. What could you do together? What would be one way to try it out?

From centralized to distributed. While management often espouses the notion that good ideas can come from everywhere, in practice there are “thinkers” who create strategies and designated “doers” who execute those strategies. But that only leaves an air sandwich in the organization, where debates, tradeoffs, and necessary discussions are skipped. This air sandwich is the source of all strategic failure. Instead of centralized decisions, we need distributed input and distributed decisions.

Actionable exercise: Rather than making command and control a “bad” thing, discuss what areas needs which controls. Then examine how more, if not most, areas and decisions can distributed (and thus made radically more flexible). For the purpose of the exercise, say that you want 50% or 70% all decisions to be free of permission-seeking and check-ins. What would it take to get there?

When we emphasize purpose, engage communities, and distribute decision-making, we begin to stop talking about being fast, fluid, and flexible, and actually begin to make our organizationsbecome fast, fluid, and flexible. This can change how we organize every single part of these organizations — from what we make, to how we product and distribute, to how we market and sell. Everything.

Disrupting How We Work
Many of you know of Clay Christensen’s iconic work the Innovators Dilemma. Small newcomers eat off bits of an established leader’s business through lower cost structure and a willingness to accept lower margins. This phenomenon has been seen in industry after industry, and usually focused on the cost of delivering goods and services. In other words, “Look how the steel mini-mills making rebar disrupt the established integrated steel mills making sheet steel.” At each point in the disruption, it makes economic sense for the big company to surrender that bit of the market to the disruptor, and so big companies logically put themselves out of business.

I think there is an analogous process going on with the organizational structure of businesses themselves; that aside from market-specific competition from below, there is also competition from disruptive organizations that are finding new ways to get work done. This change is just as threatening to established businesses as the process competitors Christensen identified, and just as difficult to respond to.

Where once you could reexamine the organization’s model (the how) every few years to support the rest of the business (the what), reinventing the how becomes its own muscle to develop.

How does this lead to disruption? To answer this question, let’s look at Singularity University, which I mentioned earlier in this series. You might recall that they deliver an education curriculum of 300 hours with seven full-time staff. Their organizational model lets them then fluidly reinvent what they create next, thus baking innovation in with their disruptive design. In particular some 80% of their business resources are fluid. Their purpose doesn’t change, but their “what” does. Their business model allows them to persistently review “what’s the next big thing” and adjust. Using Christensen’s metaphor, educational institutions are the sheet steel with its ever-increasing tuitions to support their tenured staff, while Singular University is the rebar. But their flexible design gives them the chance to keep being the “rebar.”

What Happens Now
Rather than try to power through with size, we’ll have to find power through shared purpose.

Rather than hiring and directing inside the walls of an organization, we’ll tear down those walls altogether and allow everyone to own a part of the big picture.

Rather than taking long stretches of time to perfect something, we’ll build fast, fluid and flexible organizations.

What we create in the end will be a different type of organization, one that embodies a culture of innovation.

Since I began writing this series, many of you have written publicly and privately asking, doesn’t this just mean the “800-pound gorilla” dies? Entrepreneurs and the startup ecosystem who embody fast / fluid / flexible attributes certainly believe that the established players are fated to die. Many think of these big organizations as the dinosaurs of our time. But one can look at the history of dinosaurs and see that dinosaurs didn’t really die. Paleontologists have suggested that dinosaurs are all around us today actually, as birds.

Applied to today’s business giants, the analogy probably holds. The “species” that adapt to the changes in the environment faster will do better. That is for sure. What is less clear is what they will become as they adapt. Perhaps the new model for a successful business should be “Nimble.” Or “Flux.” Or “Humanized.” Or “Networked.” Frankly, I find the search for naming less-than-fruitful. We have plenty of names already; will another name really help you act?

Over time, there will be a lot more dots filling out this picture. But the fundamental principles of the social era are already clear enough to form a new set of organizing principles for business. The world has changed; how we create value has changed. Organizationally we have not. It’s time to pay attention to these emerging business models now, to benefit our organizations, our economies, and ourselves.

Social Media and Your Business Communication Strategy | The Future of Work

#E2sday: Social Media and Your Business Communication Strategy | The Future of Work.

Social media is rapidly transforming the way organizations communicate with customers. As a cost-effective way to engage online, social media gives companies broader reach beyond traditional communication methods like email. With a simple post or tweet, businesses can promote products and services, provide instant feedback or support, creating an online community of brand enthusiasts. Staying competitive in today’s fast moving business landscape requires a solid social media strategy. Today’s #E2sday looks at some of the reasons your organization should be including social media in your communication strategy.

CLICK ON IMAGE TO ENLARGE

#E2sday Social Media and Your Business Communication Strategy

Strategy Roundtable For Entrepreneurs: Top 10 Online Advertising Trends For The Decade | Share on LinkedIn

via Strategy Roundtable For Entrepreneurs: Top 10 Online Advertising Trends For The Decade | Share on LinkedIn.

We started this week’s roundtable with a discussion of the top 10 tech trends to watch for the upcoming decade. The trends include Cloud computing, outsourcing, social Web, vertical and local Web, smartphones and tablets, online advertising, online video, online gaming, e-books, and bootstrapped entrepreneurship. You can find details in the blog post onhttp://www.sramanamitra.com.

As for the entrepreneur pitches, first up today was Bhupendra Kanal withInRev, a social CRM analytics company. Bhupendra has built a product and has started engaging a few customers. He is, however, playing in an extremely, extremely crowded space. Bhupendra’s questions were largely around competition. My key advice to him was to focus on acquiring customers, and getting a thorough positioning exercise done based on segmentation, competitive analysis and market sizing to identify a segment where competition is less active and the product is particularly effective.

Lead411Lead411 is a company and people information provider which includes sales triggers derived from news, sales leads, business addresses, people search, sales intelligence, executive lists, etc. In addition to their subscriptions, they also provide awards like the Technology 500 and a marketing blog focused on news/tips for sales & marketing professionals.

Ad powered by BTBuckets

GotProduce.com

Next Deborah Walliser with Solsustech discussed GotProduce.us. Today, the company produces low carbon footprint fruits and vegetables and sells to distributors in California, Nevada and Arizona. However, Deborah is looking for ways to sell her low carbon footprint green house technology to producers, and is in conversations with producers in Senegal and India. I asked her to stop wasting her time on producers in countries that do not have any focus on carbon footprint optimization, and instead look for countries and states with governments that have incentives and programs to encourage producers to optimize their carbon footprint. Hard ROI is essential to get dollars flowing.

DealCurrent.com

Then Jimmy Hendricks presented DealCurrent.com, a white label platform for media companies to manage daily deal advertising on behalf of brands. Jimmy already has about 65 customers and about a million dollars in annual revenue. The company is profitable and has so far raised only $400,000 in friends and family and angel financing. The top two competitors are both venture funded to the tune of $5 million each, and have about the same or lower customer traction. Jimmy asked if he should be raising money at this point.

My advice was to not raise money if he didn’t need to. Jimmy has already managed the most complex part of the bootstrapping phase with very little outside investment. At this point, he can grow organically and leverage channel partners and other creative modes of non-equity financing and preserve equity as much as possible. This also makes it much more lucrative for him in the event that an acquisition happens in the medium term. More investment would make it more difficult to get a lucrative exit that creates sizable returns for everybody.

It is clear to me, after doing these coaching sessions for over two years, that entrepreneurs need a lot more training on positioning and go-to-market. As such, I have created video lecture modules with case studies in the 1M/1M premium lounge on these topics with very specific guidance on what analysis to perform and how. The easiest way for me to teach a large number of entrepreneurs some of these basics is to have you spend 30-40 hours on the curriculum I have created, and THEN have you come work with me on refining your strategies and positioning.  

I have thought a lot about how to make entrepreneurship education and eco-system scalable and accessible to a vastly larger number of people. The answer to that question, I believe, is the 1M/1M Premium Lounge. Over the upcoming months, the program will become much, much richer. But for the moment, we can get you started and give you a significant jump-start.

Recordings of previous roundtables are all available here. You can register for the next roundtablehere.

Sramana Mitra is a technology entrepreneur and strategy consultant in Silicon Valley. She has founded three companies, writes a business blog, Sramana Mitra on Strategy, and runs the 1M/1Minitiative. She has a master’s degree in electrical engineering and computer science from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Her Entrepreneur Journeys book series,  Entrepreneur Journeys Bootstrapping: Weapon Of Mass Reconstruction Positioning: How To Test, Validate, and Bring Your Idea To Market Innovation: Need Of The Hour, as well as  Vision India 2020, are all available from Amazon.

Should a new brand take off rapidly like a rocket ship? Or should a new brand take off slowly like an airplane? (source: the brand strategy insider)

One of the enduring marketing myths is that a new brand that will eventually become a big brand has to take off in a hurry. And that a marketer should devote enormous resources to assure a rocket-ship launch.

Not true.

One of the hottest food categories of this decade is ‘low carb’. From 2002 – 2004 1,558 new low-carb products were introduced. Sales of low-carb products near the height of the craze in 2004 was $30 billion.

And when did the low-carb revolution start? Thirty-four years before the craze with the publication of Dr. Atkins’ New Diet Revolution.

More than three decades had to pass before low-carb became a high-visibility category. Not all categories are alike. Some grow faster than others. High-tech, for example, is one of the fastest growing.

Perhaps no product grew as fast as the personal computer. The first PC was introduced in 1975, the same year Bill Gates dropped out of Harvard to go to Albuquerque, New Mexico, to write a basic software program for the MITS Altair 8800 computer.

Microsoft, the company Gates founded, is today one of most valuable companies in the world, worth $76 billion on the stock market.

Things weren’t always so rosy. On February 3, 1976, Bill Gates wrote an open letter to Altair users complaining about software piracy. Published in the Homebrew Computer Club newsletter, Gates stated, ‘The amount of royalties we have received from sales to hobbyists makes the time spent on Altair BASIC worth less than $2 an hour.’

Most people who found themselves working for less than $2 an hour would have looked for some other line of work. Not Bill Gates. His faith in the future of his software paid off in a big way.

The way to build a new brand is by creating a new category. And creating a new category takes time. It even takes awhile for a new category to be recognized as a new category. One of Bill Gates’ early problems was the perception that computer software wasn’t worth anything. So owners just copied the software needed to operate their computers from friends. (Less than 10 percent of Altair owners bought Microsoft’s software.)

There are two theories for launching a new brand.

Theory A (for airplane) is the airplane launch. Your new brand rolls slowly down the runway for thousands of feet and then after a massive effort your brand slowly lifts off the concrete. After your brand is airborne for awhile, it starts to accelerate into its cruising altitude.

Theory B (for big bang) is the rocket-ship launch. Your new brand takes off like a rocket and then coasts into orbit.

MORE ? http://www.brandingstrategyinsider.com/2009/10/the-brand-launch-myth.html

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