2017 in France:  More time with digital media per day than TV & More time with mobile devices then desktop and laptop time – eMarketer

Source: Media Time Will Tilt Digital in France in 2017 – eMarketer

Next year will mark a major milestone for media consumption in France. According to eMarketer’s latest forecast of time spent with media, the average adult will spend more time with digital media per day than TV, a first for that country. Also next year, time spent with mobile devices will surpass desktop and laptop time.

Average Time Spent per Day with TV* vs. Digital Media by Adults in France, 2013-2018 (hrs:mins)

In 2017, eMarketer estimates, adults in France will spend almost 4 hours per day online on desktop or laptop PCs or with nonvoice mobile activities. This compares to 3 hours and 51 minutes watching television. Daily TV viewing time will actually rise slightly, by 0.1%, while total digital media consumption will be up by just over 5.0%.

In another first for the country, next year adults in France will spend more time accessing the internet through mobile means rather than desktop or laptop PCs. This year, the average adult will spend 1 hour 41 minutes on nonvoice mobile activities, compared with 1 hour and 44 minutes of internet use on desktops and laptops.

Average Time Spent per Day with Desktop/Laptop* vs. Mobile Internet by Adults in France, 2013-2018 (hrs:mins)

Although mobile media consumption is booming, this year adherence to traditional media, such as print and radio will still be relatively popular in France. This year, eMarketer expects, adults will spend 35 minutes a day with print, compared with 3 hours and 46 minutes for digital. Time spent with both newspapers and magazines is forecast to drop this year, by 3.1% and 2.4%, respectively. By 2018, eMarketer predicts, adults will spend just 34 minutes per day with print, compared with 4 hours and 7 minutes for digital.

“Over 70% of France’s internet users also have a smartphone this year, eMarketer estimates, and that share will reach 76% in 2017,” said senior analyst Karin von Abrams. “At the same time, all major online information and service providers—not to mention Facebook, Twitter and other popular social networks—now cater for mobile users with sophisticated, user-friendly apps or mobile sites. So it’s no surprise to find that mobile devices claim an increasing share of time spent on the web. We expect that trend to continue in 2017, as well.”

– See more at: https://www.emarketer.com/Article/Media-Time-Will-Tilt-Digital-France-2017/1014720?ecid=NL1010#sthash.2DiuMpyc.dpuf

How Netflix, Amazon, Hulu Use Big Data to Change TV Watching

Source: How Netflix, Amazon, Hulu Use Big Data to Change TV Watching

 

To radically change TV-watching habits.

Traditional television viewership is on the decline, and fewer people are actually going to the movies. Meanwhile, streaming video services like Netflix, Amazon’s Instant Video, and Hulu keep adding subscribers and original programming.

It’s getting harder and harder to deny that digital content providers are dramatically altering the entertainment industry. So, how did they do it—and what will be required for traditional networks and studios to stay in the game?

Michael Smith and Rahul Telang—two professors at Carnegie Mellon University’s Heinz College of Public Policy and Management—explore these questions in their new book, Streaming, Sharing, Stealing: Big Data and the Future of Entertainment, published by MIT Press last month. In an interview with Fortune, Smith discussed the new book, Netflix’s hit, House of Cards, and the future of entertainment.

The following conversation has been edited and condensed for clarity.

Fortune: Your book describes the success of Netflix’sHouse of Cards as a turning point for the entertainment industry and digital content. Why was that such a big deal?

Smith: The making of House of Cards illustrates how a bunch of different changes coming together at the same time can be really disruptive to the traditional industry. The thing that Netflix had that nobody else in the industry had was they didn’t just know that there were a bunch of [fans of the House of Cards‘ lead actor, Kevin Spacey] in the abstract, they knew exactly who those Kevin Spacey fans were and they could use the platform to target them directly. So, Netflix went out and created nine separate trailers for House of Cards and targeted them directly to those users. So, I think part of the story is the power of detailed customer data to help you do a better job of marketing the content.

Has the thinking among traditional media giants—who have frequently downplayed the competition they face from services like Netflix—evolved at all in recent years?

There are a lot of very smart, very capable people, who I respect, saying we’re in a content bubble [and] there’s way too much content being made right now for what’s economically feasible. And, what we’re trying to gently push back in the book is the economics of the large-scale bundled subscription model that Netflix is pursuing, [where what the] economic theory says is you can profitably make things in a bundle that wouldn’t be profitable if you sold them separately. I think it’s just as likely that what we’re seeing is the new economics of what’s possible in a Netflix-style bundle. This isn’t a bubble of content production; this is the new normal of what’s possible.

What’s the biggest reason streaming services have a leg up over traditional media companies?

Netflix, Amazon, and Google all own their own data and they don’t share it with anybody in the entertainment industry.

People have made a big deal about the idea of “binge-watching” as the embodiment of the changing way weconsume media. But, what about the tailored content, based on users’ tracked habits? Which is more important?

Both. It’s understanding at a detailed level how individual consumers are accessing the content, and then using the platform to help them discover and find exactly the right content that’s going to meet their tastes. What the academic literature says is that consumers get an incredible amount of value from being able to find exactly the kind of content that meets their unique tastes—and that consumers’ tastes are incredibly varied, more so than what you can find with traditional broadcast channels.

So, what’s the future of entertainment? What will the industry look like in a decade?

We try not to prognosticate too much in the book. What I do think is true is, because of the nature of the data and consumer behavior, a lot of these channels become winner-take-all or winner-take-most-all kind of markets. I think we’re going to have a small number of very powerful players. Now, we’ve always had a small number of very powerful players—what we’re saying in the book is there’s a very high likelihood that it could be a different set of players if the traditional industry folks don’t move quickly.

Could there be consolidation among some of the big companies operating Hulu?

It’s possible. I honestly think that’s their best strategy, to come up with a separate platform. The separate platforms are certainly a good start. The problem is I have no idea what it CBS content versus ABC content, and even less so for movies. Both for marketing reasons and pure economic reasons, it’s much better to go with a common platform that brings together content from a bunch of different players than to try to go with individual platforms for all the different players.

Where do the biggest brands spend their marketing dollars? | Search Engine Watch

Source: Where do the biggest brands spend their marketing dollars? | Search Engine Watch

Different retailers have different priorities when it comes to their marketing budgets, but the most valuable brands – Amazon and Apple – are banking on search.

We all know Amazon is the undisputed king of ecommerce. From November 2014 to November 2015, the company raked in more than $71 billion in online sales, which is more than Walmart, Apple, Macy’s, The Home Depot, Best Buy, Costco, Target, Gap Inc., Williams-Sonoma, Sears and Kohl’s sold.Combined.

What is Amazon doing that the others aren’t?

According to Fractl, a Florida-based content marketing agency which analyzed the marketing spend of these massive retailers, search gets the lion’s share of Amazon’s budget. During that year period, the ecommerce giant spent $8 million on TV and radio, a number that sounds very high in isolation. However, Amazon spent $54 million [≈ total US Soccer salaries for all teams, 2011] on print and $1.35 billion ≈ Mobile advertising spending, 2007″>[≈ box office sales of Bambi, 1942] on search.

amazon-budget

Among the other retailers, only Apple – called the most valuable brand in the world last year – and Etsy prioritize search to such a degree. Apple spent far more on TV and outdoor advertising than Amazon, though search still made up 86 percent of its spend. Search was an even higher percentage for Etsy:91 percent, with 1.39 million going to search and $90,000 [≈ cost of Porsche 911] to other digitalchannels.

The Etsy finding was the most interesting to Lillian Podlog, project manager at Fractl, who noted that Etsy doesn’t have the same juggernaut status as Apple and Amazon.

“With Amazon and Apple, you can ask what came first, their success or where they put their marketing dollars. Maybe at this point, they can do anything, but Etsy has the same tactic and if you look at organic search rankings, it’s doing really well,” she says.

Etsy saw among the highest ROI in the study. For every $1 spent on marketing, the online marketplace saw $1,600 [≈ High-end bicycle] in sales. Additionally, Etsy, along with Apple and Amazon, had a disproportionately high SEMrush rankings compared with the others, which means they saw higher organic traffic.

That’s a common correlation among the brands analyzed by Fractl. Most of those with larger search spends have higher SEMrush rankings.

“So many people use ad blockers, so many people have blindness to display ads. Investing in search, whether its paid or building your SEO, requires you to really think about what kind of content you’re putting on the Internet that would appeal to users and boost your SEO,” says Podlog. “It requires you to be more thoughtful and considerate about what the customer really wants.”

Among the only exceptions to that rule are Williams-Sonoma and The Home Depot. Digital makes up51 percent of sales – and 57 percent of the marketing budget – for the former. Nearly a quarter of that budget goes to search, but Williams-Sonoma still doesn’t rank particularly high. On the other hand, The Home Depot does, despite only spending 11 percent on search, instead prioritizing TV and radio.

homedepot-spend

Where do some of the other major players put their money?

  • Best Buy puts the majority of its dollars in TV and digital, favoring network channels and display advertising over cable and search.
  • Costco, on the other hand, largely eschews TV. Instead, the warehouse retailer allocates 57 percent of its marketing dollars to display and nearly all the rest to magazines and newspapers.
  • Macy’s is another one with a heavy print focus. The brand spends $16 million [≈ Most expensive car ever sold, Ferrari] on display and $32 million [≈ US Chamber of Commerce election spending in 2010] on search, which sounds like a lot of money, but is just a drop in the bucket by comparison. Macy’s spends 5.5 times as much on TV and more than 8 times as much on print.macys-spend
    “Macy’s is one of those companies that has an established name and an established consumer base, but if it wants to take some of Amazon’s chunk of online retail, it has to invest more in those other channels,” says Podlog. “Macy’s has been around for so long, but I personally think that unless it changes the shape of its spending, it’s going to suffer.”
  • Nordstrom’s priority is similarly on print – $27 million [≈ Energy industry 2011 political donations] on magazines, compared with $6 million on search, $4 million on display, $5 millionon TV and $2 million on outdoor – but the strategy is a bit different from that of Macy’s. While Macy’s spends most of its money on newspapers, Nordstrom goes for magazines, a medium that meshes better with the brand’s luxury focus.
  • Netflix, despite being heralded as one of the premier digital disruptors, doesn’t spend nearly as much money on digital advertising as one would assume. The streaming giant spends $1 million [≈ 1965 typical CEO pay] each on display and online video, and $17 million [≈ Most expensive car ever sold, Ferrari] on TV with a particularly heavy focus on network. It makes to sense to Podlog, who points out that “people are watching TV, they’re not on Netflix.”
  • Target’s marketing budget is probably the most balanced. The retailer spends 46 on TV, 22 on print and 28 percent on digital. The majority of that digital spend is allocated to search, but $23 million [≈ Typical endowment, liberal-arts university] is still set aside for online video.

 

2016: Digital — which includes mobile — is neck-and-neck with TV ad spend in the US – eMarketer

Source: Ad Agency Clients Are Most Interested in Advertising on TV – eMarketer

Roughly half of US ad agency professionals said their clients are most interested in advertising on spot TV or spot cable—more than any other medium including digital, mobile, streaming video and radio, April 2016 research revealed.

Media on Which Their Clients Are Most Interested in Advertising According to US Ad Agency Professionals, April 2016 (% of respondents)

Media buying and selling software provider Strata surveyed 84 US ad agency professionals who were at the media director level or higher at agencies of varying sizes. When it came down to the advertising media their clients were most interested in, TV was the top choice.

Digital was second. Indeed, 31% of US ad agency professionals said their clients were most interested in advertising on that medium. Few respondents said their clients were most interested in advertising on mobile.

US Total Media Ad Spending, by Media, 2016 & 2020 (billions)

eMarketer estimates that digital—which includes mobile—is neck-and-neck with TV ad spend in the US. eMarketer expects outlays on digital ads will hit $68.82 billion  in 2016, while TV spending will total $70.60 billion.

Nevertheless, no other medium can challenge TV’s dominance of the US advertising market. According to eMarketer, spending on every other medium combined, which includes print, radio and out-of-home, doesn’t come close.

– See more at: http://www.emarketer.com/Article/Ad-Agency-Clients-Most-Interested-Advertising-on-TV/1014270?ecid=NL1002#sthash.IQZrlkF4.dpuf

Objets Connectés: Explication de la géolocalisation des coureurs sur le Tour 2015 (Source: RTBF)

Pour la première fois sur une course cycliste professionnelle, tous les coureurs engagés au départ du Tour seront équipés de capteurs capables d’envoyer en direct leur position GPS. Grâce au partenariat passé avec Dimension Data, le traitement et l’analyse de ces données permettront aux internautes et aux téléspectateurs de suivre le Tour avec un nouveau regard, plus complet, plus précis. Et l’expérience est appelée à s’enrichir avec les années…

10 ANS DE PREPARATION
Le passionné de cyclisme vit quelquefois une frustration à ne pas identifier avec certitude les différents groupes de coureurs, qu’ils soient échappés ou distancés par le peloton. Les moyens de géolocalisation qui existent et évoluent depuis plus de dix ans ont ouvert de nombreuses options pour obtenir une vision fidèle, en temps réel, de l’état de la course. En charge des systèmes d’information chez A.S.O., Pascal Queirel étudie justement ces questions et se souvient des premiers tests effectués : « En 2004, nous avions déjà placé des émetteurs sur des voitures qui suivaient les coureurs sur le chrono de l’Alpe d’Huez. Puis en 2008, c’est pour le Tour de Picardie que nous avons fait des essais sur les vélos, et un plus grand nombre de coureurs. Mais avec la transmission par GPRS, nous étions exposés à des pertes de réseaux, soit par saturation quand le public est trop nombreux, soit dans les traversées de zones non couvertes ». La possibilité d’acheminer les données par voie satellitaire ayant elle aussi été abandonnée, en raison du poids des émetteurs, c’est par les liaisons HF déjà utilisées par les signaux vidéo que circulent les informations : la première expérience à l’échelle d’un peloton entier a été menée sur Paris-Tours 2013.

LA SOLUTION TECHNIQUE : UN RESEAU MAILLÉ DE CAPTEURS
En pratique, 500 « trackers » ont été conçus et fabriqués pour équiper les vélos du Tour de France 2015. Chacun de ses capteurs, qui pèse 80 grammes, est placé sous la selle d’un coureur  et dispose d’une autonomie de 5 étapes. Il émet un signal par seconde, et envoie sa position GPS par le biais de transmetteurs installés sur 25 véhicules (voitures, motos d’officiels et d’organisation) qui feront office de « puits de remontée », c’est-à-dire dirigeront les données vers l’avion-relais. En zone technique, le dispositif mis en place avec Dimension Data sert à centraliser, traiter et diffuser cette masse d’informations aux techniciens qui les mettent en forme, puis les placent à la disposition du public.

DES INFOS PLUS PRECISES SUR LE WEB, LA TV…
Pour cette première mondiale, l’objectif affiché sera de réunir et d’utiliser avec une fiabilité maximale les données provenant des 198 coureurs du peloton, sachant que les équipes cyclistes ont toutes choisi de tabler sur cette solution d’avenir et d’adhérer à ce projet. Dès lors, une page internet complémentaire de l’appli de tracking déjà existante sur letour .fr sera mise en ligne, avec des suivis de composition de groupes et d’écarts en direct. Des représentations graphiques sont également préparées pour les diffuseurs TV, qui pourront par exemple identifier sur l’instant les coureurs victimes d’une chute. Surtout, la technologie utilisée, qui enregistre toutes les données, rend aussi possible dans l’avenir la reconstitution  de séquences de course (sprints, attaques, etc.), par exemple en 3D. A suivre…

TF1 et Youtube dans le même GRP Vidéo !

Publicité : TF1 et Youtube dans le même GRP Vidéo ! — Bouillonnements numériques.

source: http://blog.lefigaro.fr/philippe-bailly/2015/05/publicite-tf1-et-youtube-dans-le-meme-grp-video.html

Cette fois la direction est clairement affirmée : « C’est un pas de plus vers la convergence des mesures d’audience TV et Internet », commentait ce lundi Benoît Cassaigne, le Directeur des mesures d’audience de Médiamétrie, après la confirmation du lancement en juin du GRP Vidéo.

La mise au point de cet « indicateur commun aux visionnages de publicités vidéos sur téléviseur et sur Internet » constitue l’aboutissement de trois années d’échanges entre éditeurs, régisseurs, agences médias, organismes professionnels… : le 16 avril 2012, Médiamétrie avait annoncé développer en partenariat avec Google un panel spécifique visant à “mieux comprendre la complémentarité entre les écrans : télévision, ordinateurs fixes et portables, tablettes et mobiles“.

De l’exercice de compréhension, on est clairement passé en phase active de rapprochement des conditions commerciales applicables à la télévision et au Web.

Le dernier pas vers la mesure totalement unifiée – celui qui verra éditeurs et producteurs recevoir à 9 h 10 les audiences réalisées par les programmes la veille, quel que soit l’écran et quel que soit le réseau sur lequel ils ont été consommés – n’est plus très loin. Les Allemands l’ont même déjà franchi : l’équivalent local de Médiamétrie AGF a annoncé fin avril que « les résultats de YouTube seraient intégrés dès cette année dans les audiences mesurées ».

Mais une phase de pédagogie sera certainement nécessaire pour accompagner l’arrivée de cette nouvelle mesure, sur la façon de comptabiliser les spots regardés en ligne en particulier. « Le marché a approuvé, pour le GRP Vidéo,  une définition du contact Vidéo sur Internet basée sur la durée de visionnage et la part de surface exposée », indiquait lundi la communication de Médiamétrie. « Si j’ai un pré-roll de 30 secondes et que ce pré-roll est entièrement vu cela vaudra 1. Si je vois la moitié de la surface, la moitié du temps, cela vaut 0,25 », expliquait à l’automne dernierBertrand Krug, le directeur-adjoint de Médiamétrie / Net Ratings.

Restent au moins deux questions :

–          Concernant les conséquences de cette nouvelle mesure sur les modes de commercialisation des espaces, d’abord, et sur le rapprochement qui pourrait en découler en termes d’outils de reporting comme de médiaplanning.  Le GRP Vidéo pourrait bien être le cheval de Troie qui prépare l’extension à la télévision des techniques d’achat en programmatique (RTB) massivement utilisés aujourd’hui sur Internet. Avec l’étude « Programmatique en TV, nouvel enjeu de l’achat d’espaces publicitaires », NPA Conseil analyse les enjeux d’une telle évolution (identification des acteurs-clés, aspects techniques, implications sur le cadre réglementaire, enjeux commerciaux et impact en terme de rapports de force sur le marché…).

–          A propos de possibles répercussions sur le prix des espaces ensuite, avec la crainte que la constitution de facto d’un inventaire commun réunissant télévision et Web exerce une pression à la baisse sur le prix des espaces.

Les groupes audiovisuels ne sont pas démunis pour parer à cette hypothèse. En premier lieu, la totalisation des audiences qu’elles génèrent sur l’ensemble des écrans offrira une meilleure approche de leur puissance globale, et les offres mixtes TV Web qu’elles pourront créeer leur permettront d’améliorer la couverture sur les cibles les plus friandes de vidéo en ligne.

Et de même que Youtube ou DailyMotion ne commercialisent pas au même prix le film familial UGC (user generated content) et le contenu premium (official content), TF1, France Télévisions, M6 ou Canal+ ne manqueront pas aussi de faire valoir la valeur différenciante du contexte éditorial garantie aux marques. Le Baromètre de la télévision de rattrapage réalisé depuis 2011 par NPA Conseil et GFK en partenariat avec la SNPTV répond bien à cette motivation. Et demain sans doute la télévision s’inspirera-t-elle de l’exemple de l’étude Audience One qui réunit les audiences des marques de presse dans l’ensemble des univers physiques et numériques. Gutenberg source d’inspiration pour John Baird !

54% of CMOs Supplement TV Ads with Digital Video

54% of CMOs Supplement TV Ads with Digital Video.


The CMO Club and Simulmedia have released the report “The Future of TV and Digital Video.” It’s the result of a survey of more than 80 senior marketers. Over half (54 percent) said they use digital video to supplement TV as a holistic strategy, but only 31%align their budgets for TV and digital advertising spend. This separation leads to a disconnect between the value of each medium, as just over half (52%) claim that they have different expectations across the two platforms. In addition, 75% of CMOs say that they measure reach the same way for both TV and digital video and but only one-third see Nielsen as the ongoing foundation of their reach metrics.

“CMOs say they want a holistic strategy, but neither plan, measure or budget for it as one thing,” says David Cooperstein, CMO at Simulmedia and author of the report.

Other findings:
* In the past three years, digital spend has gone from 10%of advertising budgets to 24% and is forecast to rise to 36%in the next three years.

“For over a decade, marketers have attempted to find the most efficient balance between TV and digital video spend,” says Pete Krainik, Founder of The CMO Club. “Our report shows that it’s not TV vs. digital video, it’s about TV and digital video, both today and for the foreseeable future.”

*In the US, digital video advertising expenditures are exploding. Figures from eMarketer show that digital video ad spending is estimated at $6 billion this year, growing around 42% annually. However, the actual dollars spent in TV still greatly trumps digital video. TV advertising dollars in the US were approximately $76 billion in 2014 and still growing by a smidgen more than 3% annually. While both will continue to grow, TV will continue to add more raw dollars of advertising than digital video will, particularly during pivotal political and Olympics years.

“Digital depth cannot match TV’s breadth. Nor should it. Conversely, TV has not historically been as measurable or personalized, so it cannot perform the magic that digital delivers. In that very unique way, TV and digital do not compete, they complement. The winning combination is the joint approach. TV’s reach and digital’s depth make them amazing partners in the marketing mix,” says Cooperstein.

Changing TV Industry Leads Nielsen to Acquire Exelate

Sources:
Changing TV Industry Leads Nielsen to Acquire Exelate | Digital – Advertising Age.http://blogs.wsj.com/cmo/2015/03/04/nielsen-to-acquire-data-specialist-exelate/
http://www.nielsen.com/us/en/press-room/2015/nielsen-acquires-exelate.html

Nielsen has acquired data management player Exelate. The deal price was approximately $200 million, according to The Wall Street Journal.

In an interview with the Journal, Nielsen president Steve Hasker indicated his company anticipates TV ad sales moving towards a more automated future.

While programmatic ad-buying at the moment is largely a feature of the online advertising world, Mr. Hasker said he wants Nielsen to be ready if and when it moves into the $70-billion U.S. television advertising market.

“If and when” TV gets there, the digitally-focused Exelate can help Nielsen maintain its data dominance in such a world. Television ads today are still largely brought on a reach and frequency basis, which is why Nielsen’s ratings and research matter to brands trying to gauge the impact of their ads.

But if TV ads begin selling in a manner that more closely resembles digital, where ads can be served to individuals based on their interests, then Nielsen would face a major challenge to its core business.

Programmatic advertising was one of the three emerging areas the company said it was looking to tackle in a December interview with Ad Age, along with wearables and in-car viewing.

Within the ad industry, it’s widely believed that automated TV buying is at least a year or two away from reaching a meaningful level of activity

Exelate’s business has two main parts: The first is what the company calls a data exchange, or data marketplace, where it accumulates data from around 200 data sources and makes it available to advertisers and advertising technology companies to help them better target their advertising. This data is gathered primarily through “cookies” that eXelate drops on people’s Internet browsers and uses to track their online behaviors.

“We work with online publishers to find purchase intent, such as the fact that someone might be in the market for an airline ticket based on some of their behavior online, or might be interested in a flat screen television based on online behavior that we have seen across the internet,” said Mark Zagorski, CEO of eXelate.

The second part of the business is a data management platform, or DMP, that holds large stores of data and organizes them in ways that can be used for advertisers and online publishers.

HashtagBowl 2014 : 57% of the 54 Super Bowl ads / Facebook 9% / Twitter 7%

HashtagBowl 2015 returns during Super Bowl XLIX TV ads – Online Social Media.

Marketing Land will be returning its brilliant #HashtagBowl starting February 1, 2015, this is where they will for the fourth consecutive year track all social media during the games.

During the Super Bowl 49 XLIX TV ads ‘Marketing Land’ will be tracking all the social media, such as Twitter, Facebook, Google Plus, Pinterest, YouTube, Instagram and hashtags.

#HashtagBowl 2015 returns during Super Bowl XLIX TV ads pic 3

Back in 2012 there was only 25 percent of all national commercials mentioned hashtags or social media accounts, in 2013 there were just over half of all TV ads having a hashtag or some social media mention.

2014 was interesting for the hashtag mentions during the Super Bowl TV ads, hashtags were mentioned in more than 57% of Super Bowl ads. Here are the overall stats for 2014 54 national ads reviewed: Hashtags: 31 total with 57% of ads overall, Facebook: 5 total with 9% of ads overall, Twitter: 4 total, 7%, YouTube: 3 total, 6%, Shazam: 2 total, 4% and URLs: 22 total, 41% of ads overall.

#HashtagBowl 2015 returns during Super Bowl XLIX TV ads pic 2

How will the hashtag fair this year during the Super Bowl 2015 commercials?

We will update this article when the time is right. In the meantime please do visit Marketing Land, as they will be announcing the winner and share its analysis of how well Super Bowl advertisers used social media and online marketing into their ads when the game is over.