Six Digital Media Trends That Are Going To Shake Up Marketing Forever

Source: Six Digital Media Trends That Are Going To Shake Up Marketing Forever

Ross Simmonds is one of the best marketers, growth hackers, and businessmen we know, and he is about to give you some real gems you should pay attention too. Dig in, grab a notebook, and get this brainfood while its hot.

If you want to create a brand in the future, it’s unlikely that the exact same roadmaps used in the early 2000s are still going to be applicable. Some of the philosophies will still hold weight but many tactics are going to have been abused and no longer effective. Similar to how marketers have evolved from radio & magazines to programmatic advertising and social media as an avenue to drive results — change is coming.

Change is constant.

How’d you like to ensure that when change comes, you’re ready? How would you like to hear some of the latest media trends that are going to shake up marketing industry forever?

Well…

Luckily, today that’s exactly what I’m going to share.

Over the years, I’ve rode the waves of digital media opportunities. Whether it’s generating more than 1M views on Slideshare or helping brands grow to hundreds of thousands of followers on Instagram — I’ve leveraged and capitalized on many of the latest trends. And in this post, I’m going to sharesix digital media trends that will shake up the industry for years to come.

1) The Consumerization Of Media & Influencers

The body scrub company, Frank Body was one of the first brands to capitalize on Instagram fame. With an estimated sales of roughly $20 million ≈ Organized labor 2011 political donations

≈ Annual hurricane research funding in 2011

“>[≈ Typical endowment, liberal-arts university] in 2015 — the brand has grown rapidly thanks to influencers and the consumerization of media. A quick look at their newsfeed and Instagram search will show you models and regular people promoting the product:

Some of these posts are fans.

Some of these posts are paid shout outs.

When talking about Influencers in a recent interview with Nathan Chan the co-founders of Frank Body expressed that they paid Jen Selter, $20,000 ≈ Per capita income – Australia, 2005

“>[≈ Per capita income – Taiwan, 2005] for a product placement on Instagram & Twitter. At the time, Jen had around 6M followers on Instagram but today she has more than 8.2M followers and some believe she’s charging $50,000≈ Median US household income, 2009”>[≈ cost of Ford F-150] per Instagram post.

Here’s one of Jen’s posts featuring the brand:

Influencer marketing isn’t new.

What’s new is a shift from the people with millions followers being compensated for shout outs to people with thousands.

The influencer marketing company, Markerly recently conducted a survey of2 million social media influencers. In their study, they found that influencers with fewer than 1,000 followers had a higher like rate than those between1,000 and 10,000 followers. While it’s possible that these individuals low engagement is related to Instagram’s algorithm and inactive followers — the idea that almost anyone could be considered an influencer is valid.

Today, millions of dollars are being exchanged for shoutouts on Instagram, Snapchat takeovers and retweets on Twitter. As more and more people begin to create mini-brands and followings, it can be expected that more people will monetize their reach and compete with media companies for their budget as it relates to digital marketing.

According to TheShelf, brands are quickly committing to this investment:

Sites like BuySellShoutOuts.com offer brands the ability to pay influencers with all accounts sizes and covering differenttopics to promote their brands:

But this is just the beginning.

Thunderclap is a social media platform that allows people to sign up in advance and share a unified message at a specific time. Many brands have already started using this tool to drive buzz around events, non-profits and products raising money on Kickstarter. In October 2015, a project called Phonebloks generated a reach of more than 381,745,40 with supporters likeElijah Wood signing up for the campaign.

Examples of campaigns that people signed up for

Users of Thunderclap don’t currently get compensated for their tweets but I’m willing to bet, it’s coming. The willingness to offer brands the ability to tweet on your behalf isn’t new. It’s something that has been tried by many companies over the years but the trends surrounding influencers and the markets understanding of the value is an indication that this is a trend worth watching.

2) Bots Are A Media Opportunity For Brands

One of the first media companies to launch a bot was the team at Quartz. The team launched an app that feels like a friend sharing news via SMS that you read with ease. It comes with gifs, emojis, articles and of course ads like the Mini Clubman banner you see on the left.

Bots have been a hot topic for the last few months but when Facebook announced during f8 that messenger boasts 900 million users per month and it was launching a bot marketplace — it became a new ball game.

Facebook is betting on bots.

As more bots are developed we will begin seeing different more use cases. Whether it’s bots being used for the news or bots being used for shopping; the ability to connect with people through a conversational interface is an opportunity that media companies and marketers should watch.

Native content and advertising is a trend that has been soaring over the last few years. Native or Sponsored content is a model in which brands pay to have their content distributed (sometimes created) by media companies directly into their channels in a way that is often viewed as regular editorial.

Here’s an example of native content from Delete Blood Cancer on Blavity:

So what does this have to do with bots?

Well.. Imagine you’re using a fitness app.

The bot will remind you to go for a run, offer advice for meal plans and even tell you what you should do for sciatic pain — but it will also send you an article that talks about Six Reasons Why You Should Invest In The Right Shoes. Sponsored by Adidas of course…

Native advertising has been found to consistently perform better than traditional banner ads. Brands will embrace this approach within bots because it works for both the user and the publisher. I predict we will see more media companies launching bots and more bots evolving into full-fledged media companies.

3) How Stories Will Evolve Content Consumption

Facebook changed the way we find our news.

Twitter changed the way news was broken.

Snapchat and Instagram are currently fighting to determine what’s the best way for the new generation to consume it.

The last year has been a big one for Snapchat. DJ Khaled made brands open their eyes to the network as an opportunity to reach millions. Business giants proclaimed it to be the future of TV, social media and media as a whole. The rise of Snapchat resulted in profile pictures all over Twitter & Facebook to quickly change from logos & headshots to snap codes:

Instagram was once a favourite amongst youth but Snapchat quickly became a serious threat. In fall 2015, Piper Jaffray’s survey of 6,500 US teens showedthat 33% of them considered Instagram their most important social network. By this spring, that number had fallen to 27% as Snapchat took the crown.

Fast forward a few months and the momentum of Snapchat continued when Kim Kardashian did what she does best. She broke the Internet.

When she released a phone recording of Taylor Swift and Kanye West on Snapchat, every social network felt it. Journalists, the media and fans proclaimed Kim the official queen of social media and Snapchat the future:

Moments like this, the rise of DJ Khaled and the increase in usage was a clear indicators that Snapchat found gold. So earlier this year, Instagram took and stand refusing to allow Snapchat to run away with this new format and launched their own version of Stories. Creatively, they called it…

Stories.

It shares the same functionality as Snapchat allowing users to create a rolling montage of pictures and videos from the last 24 hours. It’s in this format that brands are already advertising, media companies are being launched and millions of people are watching.

4) More Free-Time = More Media Consumption

In just a few years, the idea of autonomous vehicles have gone from a futuristic dream to a realistic and disruptive product. Regardless of who you think is going to come out as the industry leader in the race towards the first fully autonomous and safe vehicle — it’s going to have an impact on media.

According to a 2016 study conducted by the Bureau of Labor Statistics, the majority of Americans spend their free time watching TV.

Watching TV was the leisure activity that occupied the most time (2.8 hours per day), accounting for more than half of leisure time

The same trend was found in places like the UK and Canada. You see, the more free time people have the more time they spend consuming content. And if we no longer have to pay attention to the road, it’s likely that we spend more time consuming visual content.

As autonomous cars become more readily available, more time will be available for people to consume content. The average travel time to work in the United States is 25.4 minutes. Meaning that over the course of a year you could consume more than 98 episodes of The Wire.

Exactly.

5)The Rise Of Vertical Video Content

Snapchats success with vertical video content has resulted in a the rise of vertical video content. For years, people suggested that vertical video was bad and that horizontal video was good:

In a leaked Snapchat pitch deck the company shared that revenues in 2015 were $59 million. The company projected to reach between $250 million ≈ cost of Airbus A380, the largest passenger airplane

“>[≈ Typical endowment, research university] and $350 million in 2016, and between $500 million [≈ net worth of Jay-Z, rapper, 2011] and $1 billion ≈ box office sales of The Jungle Book, 1967

≈ box office sales of ET: The Extra-Terrestrial, 1982
≈ box office sales of The Exorcist, 1973
≈ box office sales of Jaws, 1975

“>[≈ net worth of J.K. Rowling, author of the Harry Potter series, 2011] in in 2017.

What’s a key differentiator between Snapchat and other networks?

It embraces the vertical video. Here’s a slide from one of their earlier decks about the success that brands were having with vertical content:

Over the last few years, we’ve seen a consistent increase in the amount of video content being consumed vertically. According to eMarketer and the 2015 Mary Meeker report, 29% of all video consumed online was vertical.

Lyrical School is a Japanese female band who made a major debut into mainstream with their latest music video. Unlike most videos that are built for TV, the group created a vertical video that has more than 1.3M views:

But this is just the beginning.

More and more companies are developing ads in the vertical video format. More and more media companies are offering it as an ad unit. It’s a trend that offers a more optimal experience for mobile users and a more effective approach for brands and media companies to connect with them.

6) Big Media Begins To Niche Down

Country Side Network

Did you know that there is a magazine for almost everything?

From sheeps and pigs to technology and boats. If it’s a topic, there has likely been a magazine created about it at some point in the last 50 years. Over time, magazine sales have continue to plummet and many of the niche magazines have been the early victims of this medium’s decline.

The writing has been on the wall for years:

As the niche magazines continue to die — niche web opportunities arise.

It’s the model that allowed Reddit to become so successful. Reddit is one community that is filled with thousands of sub-communities talking about niche interests and topics. Whether it’s an entire community talking aboutBBQ or a community talking about PokemonGo — it’s a place where passionate people can learn, connect and stay up to date on interests.

Media companies are recognizing the opportunity to niche down and are investing in more niche topics to reach niche audiences. Over the last few months, we’ve seen media companies invest in more diverse categories of media content. As a result, marketers will have the ability to be more targeted in their efforts rather than making assumptions about what content their audience is likely to consume.


Are there any other trends that you think will shake things up? Did you learn something new in this post?

Let me know in the comments, I’d love to hear your thoughts. If you want more content like this, check out my semi-regular newsletter.


Ross Simmonds is a the founder of Foundation, a content marketing service company and the co-founder of Crate + Hustle & Grind.

Engagement on field: Emirates’ crew demonstrate a special “safety video” in front of 65,000 Benfica fans, with a twist…

Emirates Airline (EK) signed a three-year sponsorship deal with Lisbon’s football club Benfica in May 2015.

Under the sponsorship deal, Emirates will have its “Fly Emirates” logo on Benfica’s jersey until the end of the 2017-18 season.

On Oct. 25, the derby day between Sporting and Benfica, the official sponsor Emirates led a group of flight attendants to the center of the field and gave a special “safety video” instructions in front of about 65,000 fans.

Emirates already sponsores Arsenal in the English Premier League as well as AC Milan in Italy’s Serie A, Real Madrid in Spain’s La Liga and Paris Saint-Germain in France’s Ligue 1.

Watch Emirates’ crew demonstrate a special “safety video” in front of 65,000 Benfica fans, with a twist…

Three-fourths of the world’s mobile data traffic will be video by 2019

11 massive predictions about the future of mobile and mobile data | memeburn.

At this stage, telling anyone that we live in a mobile world seems more or less pointless. Our phones are hardwired into our daily lives and, for many of us, can seem more like artificial limbs than everyday devices. They’ve changed the world too. Web designers now think about how you’ll experience a site on a phone or tablet before they think about how you’ll see it on a desktop.

Apps meanwhile have gone from single function curiosities to powerful tools that allow us to do everything from hailing private cars to making investments on the fly.

Given that we’ve come so far since the first cellphone call was made 42 years ago, where are we likely headed to next?

Well, global networking powerhouse Cisco has lifted the cloth on its crystal ball and offered up its predictions for where mobile and mobile data are going in the next few years. And if it’s anywhere near right, then we’re in for some astonishing growth in both spaces.

1. Global mobile data traffic will increase nearly tenfold between 2014 and 2019

Mobile data traffic will grow at a compound annual growth rate (CAGR) of 57% from 2014 to 2019, reaching 24.3 exabytes per month by 2019.

Cisco Exabytes

2. By 2019 there will be nearly 1.5 mobile devices for every person on the planet

There will be 11.5 billion mobile-connected devices by 2019, including M2M modules—exceeding the world’s projected population at that time (7.6 billion).

Cisco devices

3. Mobile network connection speeds will increase more than twofold by 2019

The average mobile network connection speed (1.7 Mbps in 2014) will reach nearly 4.0 megabits per second (Mbps) by 2019. By 2016, average mobile network connection speed will surpass 2.0 Mbps.

4. By 2019, 4G will be 26% of connections, but 68% of total traffic

By 2019, a 4G connection will generate 10 times more traffic on average than a non-4G connection.

<center<Cisco 4G traffic

5. By 2019, more than half of all devices connected to the mobile network will be “smart” devices

Globally, 54% of mobile devices will be smart devices by 2019, up from 26 percent in 2014. The vast majority of mobile data traffic (97 percent) will originate from these smart devices by 2019, up from 88% in 2014.

6. By 2019, 54% of all global mobile devices could potentially be capable of connecting to an IPv6 mobile network

More than 6.2 billion devices will be IPv6-capable by 2019.

7. Nearly three-fourths of the world’s mobile data traffic will be video by 2019

Mobile video will increase 13-fold between 2014 and 2019, accounting for 72% of total mobile data traffic by the end of the forecast period.

Cisco Video

8. By 2019, mobile-connected tablets will generate nearly double the traffic generated by the entire global mobile network in 2014

The amount of mobile data traffic generated by tablets by 2019 (3.2 exabytes per month) will be 1.3 times higher than the total amount of global mobile data traffic in 2014 (2.5 exabytes per month).

9. The average smartphone will generate 4.0 GB of traffic per month by 2019

That’s a fivefold increase over the 2014 average of 819 MB per month. By 2019, aggregate smartphone traffic will be 10.5 times greater than it is today, with a CAGR of 60 percent.

10. By 2016, more than half of all traffic from mobile-connected devices (almost 14 exabytes) will be offloaded to the fixed network by means of Wi-Fi devices and femtocells each month

Without Wi-Fi and femtocell offload, total mobile data traffic would grow at a CAGR of 62 percent between 2014 and 2019, instead of the projected CAGR of 57 percent.

11. The Middle East and Africa will have the strongest mobile data traffic growth of any region with a 72% CAGR

This region will be followed by Central and Eastern Europe at 71 percent and Latin America at 59 percent.

Brands will adopt media company traits / Facebook strategy for 2015 (Inside Facebook by Jan Rezab) –

Looking ahead: Facebook strategy for 2015 – Inside Facebook.

The social landscape is undergoing near-constant change, and with that, so must a brand’s strategy. As 2014 closes, marketers are prepping for the upcoming year by strategizing ways to leverage opportunities and overcome challenges. The way in which audiences are consuming content is rapidly evolving and it’s up to brands to make sure that their Facebook strategy is congruent with those habits, ensuring success and growth for 2015. Here are my predictions for the social media network.

Video trumps photo

If a picture is worth a thousand words, imagine how much a video is worth.  Brands and users alike are gravitating more toward video content. This year the paradigm has changed as, for the first time, data shows that Pages are posting more native Facebook videos rather than YouTube videos on Facebook. Facebook is carving out their own share of the YouTube audience – a trend that will continue and grow in 2015.

We need only to look to initiatives like the ALS Ice Bucket Challenge to see how widespread video adoption has become. According to Facebook, more than two million unique videos related to the Ice Bucket Challenge have been uploaded to the social media site – garnering millions of mentions and conversations around the topic. With numbers like that, marketers are now sitting in meetings fielding the question of the year, “Where’s our Ice Bucket Challenge?”

Shareable is the new viral

Content creators have been consistently tasked with making things go viral. However, in 2015 shareable content will be priority one. Increasingly, attention has moved to producing content that is not only shareable, but content that holds meaning – the two working best in tandem. It’s not enough anymore to put a spotlight solely on number of clicks, brands are seeing more engagement when thought is put into the storytelling element of the content.

Additionally, with new Facebook policies announced for next year, marketers will have to pay close attention and evaluate the type of content being posted. Starting in January 2015, Facebook users will begin to see fewer overtly promotional posts in their News Feed. As a result, marketers will need to depend more on ad spend in order to promote posts that are product and sales specific. A benefit from this change in algorithm is that brands now have the opportunity to separate their storytelling strategy from their ad spend strategy. My belief is that this will lend marketers more incentive to develop and execute on higher-quality content strategy, which will in turn produce an uptick in the numbers of shares.

Brands will adopt media company traits 

Brands with a really strong content strategy have always thrived in an increasingly competitive and crowded social landscape, and this will become even more apparent in 2015. Brands need to take on the characteristics of media companies in order to do social well. A company like Red Bull has proven that if the content is good and on-message the audience will not only engage, but keep coming back for more.

Red Bull has become a massive global brand publisher, breaking new ground against more traditional models of social strategy and bolstering brand loyalty with their audience of over 45 million. In 2015, not only will brands adopt this strategy, but they will also leverage it for mobile.

Silence won’t be a virtue

Companies have been responding to customer inquiries on Facebook for years, but we’ve found that it still takes the average brand 33 hours to respond to a fan’s question on Facebook. In this competitive landscape, slow responses and non-responses simply won’t cut it.

In the past, social customer care may have been seen as a bonus – now it’s a requirement, and companies are realizing this. In 2015, brands will be taking customer care seriously and improving how they handle inquiries and complaints on Facebook.

Preparing for the trends above is only step one. It’s crucial that brand marketers stay agile when it comes to social media. 2015 will be about staying one step ahead of social media trends and two steps ahead of the competition.

Jan Rezab is the CEO & Co-founder of Socialbakers, a company focused on social media marketing and measurement, with clientele that includes over half of the global Fortune 500. Jan’s role is to actively push Socialbakers’s global strategy and make customers heard.

Gartner Predicts Live Video Broadcasting Will Be the New “Selfie” By 2017

Connected-Home Experiences Will Center on Video and Apps

Video and visual technologies are becoming increasingly important for interacting with customers and each other, according to Gartner, Inc. Gartner predicts that by 2017, live video broadcasting will be the new “selfie” and recommends that product managers start creating a “visual” strategy straight away to accommodate this trend.

“The next generation of consumer services and products has one main theme in common and that is video,” said Brian Blau, research director at Gartner. “This means incorporating live video or other real-time technologies into products to engage users in live events and enable more personalized communications, providing better customer support, and offering best-of-breed video and TV experiences to connected homes.”

Over the next four years, Gartner expects a noteworthy shift from static photos to video, with live video becoming as important a medium. This will be a significant development as in 2014 alone, more than a trillion photos will be taken, uploaded and shared daily, and the sharp rise in the popularity of online photos shows no signs of slowing. Although live and user-generated video is still less accessible than static photography, it is also growing in popularity.

Beyond its potential to be a richer medium for self-expression, live video’s use cases surpass what static images and prerecorded video can accomplish. It can be used for remote monitoring (of a baby, or of the security of a company’s premises), remote doctor-patient consultations and remote collaboration (via shared workspaces), and for improved customer service. As live video technology becomes more accessible, it will appear in many contexts, from mobile apps for consumers to customer support services. To benefit, users will need robust bandwidth, devices and cameras, as well as apps and services that capitalize on video’s communicative power.

Gartner made a number of further predictions about the connected home, including:

By 2018, 76 percent of connected-home apps will be accessible from smart TVs.

Smart TVs are fast becoming mass-market products. Gartner’s 2014 consumer survey indicates that almost 25 percent of U.S. households own a smart TV. In Germany, the figure is 32 percent. Gartner forecasts that worldwide, 87 percent of the TVs shipped annually will be smart TVs by 2018. This will result in such devices becoming very common in homes.

Gartner Predicts Live Video Broadcasting Will Be the New

“Despite the typically slow replacement cycle for TV sets, smart TV penetration is growing steadily,” said Fernando Elizalde, principal research analyst at Gartner. “Smart TVs are already central to the provision of connected-home entertainment. These devices can serve as access points for the control and management of other connected home devices. Applications to control and monitor home security cameras, door locks, thermostats and other connected devices are just some of many connected-home applications that could work well through smart TVs.”

Recent industry developments will bring management and control apps to smart TVs. However, the fragmentation of smart TV platforms makes it difficult for connected-home device manufacturers and app developers to focus on this “fourth screen” for access and management apps — except for media and entertainment devices. Nevertheless, as connected devices slowly gain momentum, and as an app presence on multiple screens becomes first a differentiator and then a must-have feature, smart TV apps for connected devices will reach parity with smartphone and tablet apps.

By 2018, connected-home services will cost 50 percent less than they do now.

Price could be a major factor in low adoption rates of connected-home services. Although current pricing plans offered by providers are relatively reasonable, they are additional costs for consumers on already stretched telecommunications budgets.

Providers of connected-home services that charge monthly service fees may struggle to compete with those that do not, such as home energy management providers like Hive in the U.K. and Nest (now owned by Google). Additionally, electronics stores are creating in-store connected-home areas where consumers can get expert advice on creating their own connected-home platforms. In order to offer similar experiences to their customers, service providers would need to invest in both retail space and staff education.

“The connected-home market is showing the usual signs of nascency: low penetration, high interest mainly among technology enthusiasts, and high prices,” said Jessica Ekholm, research director at Gartner. “For mass-market adoption, prices need to come down, but lowering prices won’t suffice on its own. The current lack of interest from most sectors of the public also indicates that people do not see the immediate advantage of connected home services. Embracing a strategy that offers in-store expert advice could therefore be the way forward.”

More detailed analysis is available in the Gartner Special Report “Predicts 2015: Connected-Home Experiences Will Center on Video and Apps.” The report is available on Gartner’s website athttp://www.gartner.com/document/2913417.

L’évolution du marché européen de l’ePub met en évidence la maturité du mobile et de la vidéo selon l’Adex Benchmark 2013 de l’IAB Europe – Offremedia

L’évolution du marché européen de l’ePub met en évidence la maturité du mobile et de la vidéo selon l’Adex Benchmark 2013 de l’IAB Europe – Offremedia.

L’ÉVOLUTION DU MARCHÉ EUROPÉEN DE L’EPUB MET EN ÉVIDENCE LA MATURITÉ DU MOBILE ET DE LA VIDÉO SELON L’ADEX BENCHMARK 2013 DE L’IAB EUROPE

Le 21/05/2014

nl271-images-iab europe

+11,9% en 2013, tel est le niveau de croissance de l’epub en Europe, selon la dernière étude Adex Benchmark de l’IAB Europe présentée comme chaque année lors de son événement Interact qui se déroule pour la première fois à Paris.
Dans ce paysage en croissance, la France reste un des pays les plus en retrait avec moins de 5% de progression en 2013, au 22ème rang des 26 pays pays mesurés par l’étude.
En 2012, l’évolution était de +11,5% (voir archive). Tous canaux confondus, le volume des investissements atteint 27,3 milliards d’euros.
Avec 11,5% des investissements display, le display mobile a, pour la première fois, une part de marché à 2 chiffres (11,5%) et affiche un taux de croissance de +128,5% versus 2012. Le mobile représente aussi 12,6% du volume search.
La publicité vidéo fait également preuve de dynamisme avec une hausse de +45,3%. Ce segment dépasse pour la première fois le milliard d’euros de CA (1,19 Md).
Porté par le mobile et la vidéo, le display est le segment qui affiche la croissance la plus forte en 2013 avec une progression de +14,9%. Le segment pèse 9,2 milliards € tandis que le search est en hausse de +13% pour un montant de 13,4 milliards €.


NL939-Image-IAB_Slide24
 
Ce sont les pays de l’Est et le Royaume-Uni qui continuent de tirer la croissance européenne, avec des hausses comprises entre +15% et +27% pour la Russie, la Turquie, la Slovaquie, le UK et la Hongrie
NL939-Image-IAB_Slide19
 
Le search progresse fortement en Russie (près de +35%) tandis que la Turquie est le pays où le display progresse le plus (environ +32%).
La part de la vidéo dans le display est de 13,1% en Europe. La France se situe au dessus de cette moyenne, avec près de 15%.
NL939-Image-IAB_Slide27
 
Si la moyenne européenne de la part du mobile dans le display est de 11,5%, seuls 3 pays sont au dessus de cette moyenne : le UK, la Norvège et l’Irlande. La France se situe un peu en dessous de 10%.
NL939-Image-IAB_Slide30

The Role of Digital in TV Research, Fanship and Viewing – Think Insights – Google

The Role of Digital in TV Research, Fanship and Viewing – Think Insights – Google.

Digital platforms are changing the way people experience television. With 90% of TV viewers visiting YouTube and Google Search, we looked at how they are using these platforms to extend their experiences beyond their television sets. Here we detail the importance and growth of TV-related research online, the prevalence of fan engagement through video and the role of catch-up sources to extend the viewing time frame.

Digital platforms are changing the way today’s viewer experiences television. From sharing the new viral Jimmy Kimmel Live video to watching the promo for the premiere of The Walking Dead to searching for the actor who plays the funny cop on Brooklyn Nine-Nine, one thing is clear: There are more ways than ever for TV audiences to research, participate in and access television content.

With 90% of TV viewers visiting YouTube and Google Search, we looked at search activity, video views and engagement metrics to help us understand how viewers are using these platforms.1 Looking at a broad sample of 100 network and cable shows, we found that the corresponding online behavior is a clear indicator of a show’s popularity, as evidenced by a positive correlation between these activities and live plus three-day viewership. In this paper, we examine how viewers engage with and seek out these experiences on Google and YouTube, as well as the insights we can gain from their activities.

TV-related activity on Google and YouTube has grown year-over-year (YoY). Not only have searches across Google and YouTube grown, but there has also been a rise in video views, watch time and engagement on YouTube from 2012 to2013, suggesting that TV viewers are increasingly using these platforms to interact with fellow fans and engage with a show.

YoY Increase in TV-related Activities on Google and YouTube
Source: Google Internal Data, May–December 2012 to May–December 2013, United States.

While viewers continue to turn to multiple devices for television-related content, the query growth across Google and YouTube in the television category is driven by mobile and tablet, exceeding 100% on both of these devices.2

Online research: When, what and how

The changing face of television viewing has given way to new behaviors such as viral video sharing; audience-generated supplementary content; online streaming and use of catch-up sites such as Netflix, Hulu and networks’ streaming offerings. One thing remains consistent, though—a viewer’s desire to gain basic information about a show before tuning in.

Trailers, reviews, cast information and premiere dates are all common but essential types of content sought by viewers. Gathering this type of information is an important step in deciding whether or not to watch a show: Two-thirds of viewers of new television shows search online before tuning in.3 Overall, both Google and YouTube serve as key destinations in the television viewers’ decision-making process. Our analysis of Google and YouTube search queries and YouTube views show positive .72, .74 and .67 correlations with live plus three-day viewership, respectively.4

Let’s take a closer look at Google and YouTube search and viewing behaviors, specifically the whenwhat and how of seeking information and content:

When: We see that queries for fall television programs begin during upfronts and continue beyond the premiere, with increased activity during key show announcements and summer TV tentpoles such as Comic-Con and the Television Critics Association Press Tour (TCAs).

When TV Viewers Are Searching
*Different premiere dates affect when events are relative to premiere date for a majority of shows. Data represents average query volume for 100 fall TV shows.
Source: Google Internal Data, May–December 2013, United States.

Although this trend holds true for most shows, there are a few differences worth noting. New shows see spikes during upfront announcements, and then interest builds again about two months before the premiere date. Returning shows, in contrast, see sustained volume throughout the off-air period. Although new shows generally have fewer searches than returning shows, they have twice as many queries, on average, for promos, ratings and reviews. This suggests that users may be doing their homework prior to tuning in.

In addition, there are a few genre differences worth noting. From a trending standpoint, there is more activity earlier on for dramas and comedies. Queries for reality programs pick up in the few weeks leading up to premiere and are sustained post-premiere. In examining search intensity (queries/live plus three-day viewership), serialized dramas—especially teen dramas such as Vampire Diaries and Arrow—have the highest search intensity, followed by comedies and reality shows. Procedural dramas, in contrast, have the lowest search intensity.5

What: Outside of a show’s title, some of the most common TV-related search terms include season, TV show, network and cast modifiers, among others. Of these, we see that some are sustained throughout the premiere timeline, while others are concentrated to parts within it. For instance, promo queries spike at upfront week and tend to start building again about two months pre-premiere. Premiere-related queries are concentrated in the weeks leading up to and immediately following the premiere. Ratings and review queries, on the other hand, tend to be concentrated during premiere week and the weeks after it.

What TV Viewers Are Searching For…and When
Source: Google Search Internal Data, May–December 2013, United States.

One important component of what users are searching for is trailers for new shows. In addition to being frequently searched, the trailer is the most watched piece of content for new shows on YouTube, whereas videos viewed for returning shows are more varied in nature.6

“In addition to being frequently searched, the trailer is the most watched piece of content for new shows on YouTube.”

How: We examined 17 categories of Google Search queries across devices and discovered that intent can vary by device. For instance, cast, premiere/finale and plot-related searches regularly occur on mobile devices relative to other categories, suggesting that users often seek quick bits of information on a small screen. Alternatively, watch-related queries on Google Search are overwhelmingly searched on desktop and tablet devices, highlighting a preference among users to consume longer content on larger-screened devices.

How TV Viewers Are Searching
Source: Google Search Internal Data, June–December 2013, United States.

Viewer participation: Going beyond the episode

For a core group of fans, a 22- or 44-minute TV episode isn’t enough. Whether it’s seeking additional content offline (such as the live talk show Talking Deadthat discusses episodes of The Walking Dead) or online (network websites or industry sources such as imdb.com), TV lovers are looking to further engage with their favorite programs through “beyond-the-episode” content such as parodies, behind-the-scenes clips, and extended trailers found on YouTube. To better understand their online experience, we look to YouTube engagement metrics (i.e., shares, likes/dislikes, comments, subscribes), which collectively show a positive .58 correlation to live plus three-day viewership.7

A key behavior among YouTube users is the propensity to discuss their favorite shows and create new related content. Indeed, in 2013, for every piece of content uploaded by a show’s network on YouTube, there were more thanseven pieces of community-generated content related to the show. Some fan favorites far exceed that benchmark: Game of Thrones, for example, had 82 community-generated videos per video uploaded by the network and The Vampire Diaries had 69.8

These same fans are not only engaging with this content but also looking for ways to share and discuss it with a community of like-minded fans. An example of this collective enthusiasm can be found in YouTube’s subscriber community. Overall, they tend to watch 52% more video than those who don’t subscribe.9And because they watch more video overall, they’re often the first to discover content.

A popular late-night talk show’s highly viewed YouTube video that reached one million views in less than 18 hours exemplifies this phenomenon.10 We can see that subscribers comprise the majority of views right after the video goes live, but over time, discovery sources begin to shift as these initial viewers (the subscribers) share the video with others. As views from subscribers begin to taper off, direct links, YouTube searches and other user-controlled discovery methods take over. This highlights the importance of a strong subscriber base because subscribers are often the first to see and subsequently share content.

Viewership Pattern After Posting of Popular Video
Source: Google Internal Data, November 2013, United States.

It’s also a reflection of a larger trend on YouTube—overall, the platform has seen a 3x increase YoY in daily subscribers.11 Additionally, TV networks have been gaining subscribers for their official YouTube channels at a blistering rate, with an average per-channel subscribership increase of 69% from the beginning to the end of 2013.12

Accessing content: Extending the viewership timeline

In the past few years, we’ve seen a shift in measurement as metrics have evolved to capture longer viewing windows. This reflects not just a change in user behavior but recognition that there is considerable value in time-shifted viewing. With shows seeing a marked increase in viewership numbers across genres in the three days following a premiere and between seasons, tune-in is now happening across a much more extended timeline.

One significant trend is in-season catch-up behavior. DVRs, new streaming options and watch apps provide viewers with greater flexibility than ever to watch the content they want, when they want it. Search patterns also reveal a rising interest in this notion of “TV on my time.” Queries on paid streaming providers such as “Amazon Instant Video” or “Hulu Plus,” have increased 16% YoY, while watch app-related queries, such as “HBO GO” and “AMC mobile,” have increased 35% YoY.13

Catch-up behavior is not restricted to in-season activity. If given the opportunity to catch up on a show before a new season, 78% of viewers would be more likely to tune in to the upcoming season.14 Query trends also reflect this sentiment: in the pre-premiere time frame, watch-related queries have increased 50% YoY, signaling intent to catch up on previous episodes before a season premiere.15 So when do viewers start catching up? Of the 70% who said that they catch up on past seasons of returning shows, approximately half start more than two months in advance.16

Day of week can also play a role in catch-up activity. Because viewership patterns show greater preference for time-shifted viewing of dramas, we analyzed pre-season search patterns for a set of dramas and found that catch-up-related queries tend to spike on Sundays. This “lazy Sunday effect” suggests that Sundays may be the most popular day of the week to both stream and catch up on shows.

Pre-Premiere, Daily Query Trending for Hit Serialized Dramas Catch-up Related Queries
Source: Google Internal Data, May–August 2013, United States.

As networks and streaming providers create new ways for viewers to access programming outside the traditional viewing window, they’re creating the opportunity for new viewership as well. Understanding the patterns of how and when viewers are researching catch-up options is important in recognizing key moments of tune-in engagement.

Summary

Digital platforms have fundamentally changed the way TV viewers research, participate in and access their favorite shows. Search, video and engagement activities, which show a positive correlation to viewership, can provide additional insight into a show’s popularity. Here we summarize our key observations across Google and YouTube:

Research

  • We see online television activity growth in the YoY increase in TV-related queries on Google and YouTube, and a rise in watch time, engagement with, and views of TV-related videos on YouTube.
  • Across the board, viewers are starting their research well before a premiere, with activity continuing several weeks beyond the premiere.

Participation

  • TV audiences often look to go “beyond-the-episode” on YouTube.
  • YouTube’s subscribers are fans who actively engage with a show and other fans, and they’re often key in spreading the word.
  • YouTube users engage with their favorite shows through discussion and creation of new related content.

Access

  • Time shifting is here to stay, with catch-up behavior starting well before new seasons and continuing after episode premieres.
  • Sunday may be the most popular day of the week to both stream and catch up on shows.

Sources:
1 Nielsen, @Plan, Q4 2013.
2 Google internal data, May – December 2012 to May – December 2013, United States.
3 Google/Ipsos OTX, Pathways to TV Consumption Study, 2013.
4 Google Internal Data and Nielsen TV Toolbox, United States.
Analysis looks at relationship between non-premiere live plus three-day viewership and leading seven-day Google and YouTube queries and YouTube views for cable and network shows across drama, comedy and reality genres. Analysis excludes outliers such as teen-skewing shows, musical reality competitions and shows with several searchable non-TV entities. View metrics analyzed on a representative sample of 32 fall shows.
5 Google Internal Data and Nielsen TV Toolbox, September–December 2013, United States.
6 Google Internal Data, 2013, United States.
7 Google Internal Data and Nielsen TV Toolbox, United States.
Analysis looks at relationship between non-premiere live plus three-day viewership and leading seven-day engagement metrics (likes/dislikes, comments, shares and subscribes) for cable and network shows across drama, comedy and reality genres. Analysis excludes outliers such as teen-skewing shows, musical reality competitions and shows with several searchable non-TV entities. Engagement metrics analyzed on a representative sample of 32 fall shows.
8 Google Internal Data, 2013, United States.
9 Google Internal Data, January 2014, United States.
10 Google Internal Data, November 2013, United States.
11 Google Internal Data, October 17, 2013.
12 Google Internal Data, 2013, United States.
13 Google Internal Data, 2012–2013, United States.
14 Google, Google Consumer Survey, n=500, March 8, 2013.
15 Google Internal Data, T-12 week – premiere week, United States.
16 Google, Google Consumer Survey, n=500, February 6, 2014.

  • Andrea Chen

 

 

First Broadcast of “1984” of Apple was 31st of December 1983 in Twinfalls ….

Un peu partout dans la nuit du 22 au 23 janvier, la presse américaine a célèbré le trentième anniversaire du tout premier ordinateur d’Apple, la firme américaine qui depuis, a fait du chemin. Parallèllement, elle fête aussi «l’une des publicités les plus célèbres de tous les temps», «considérée comme un chef d’oeuvre», écrit le Huffington Post: le fameux spot 1984, réalisé par Ridley Scott (le papa d’un des Alien).

Cette vidéo a effectivement annoncé la sortie du premier Macintosh d’Apple. Mais non, nous n’en fêtons pas son trentième anniversaire en ce 23 janvier 2014.
Contrairement à une idée répandue, la première (et unique) diffusion de cette publicité ne remonte pas au Superbowl du 22 janvier 1984, mais au 31 décembre 1983. «Juste quelques minutes avant minuit pour être exact», précise le site Tuaw. A cet instant précis, la fameuse publicité était ainsi diffusée dans une petite ville de l’Idaho, Twin Falls.

Pourquoi? Tout simplement parce que l’équipe de publicitaires derrière 1984 voulait qualifier la vidéo «aux prix [récompensant la meilleure] publicité de 1983», explique App Advice.

La petite localité de Twin Falls a donc été choisie, «probablement en raison de sa situation éloignée et de sa faible audience la nuit», racontait en 2012 au site Mentalfloss l’opérateur qui a eu la responsabilité de lancer la publicité en cette veille de 1984. Et d’ajouter:

«Ils ne voulaient vraiment pas que quiconque la voie et la commente. Le Super Bowl devait être la “première” officielle. […] Après la diffusion, la cassette vidéo a été renvoyée à l’agence.»

En savoir plus ?
http://www.slate.fr/life/82615/non-pas-anniversaire-celebre-pub-1984-apple