Digital Vietnam 2019 (by We are Social) – Special Content for my students in Saigon !

Social Media Interactions are Changing – Here’s Why That’s Important

In a recent post, marketing expert Mark Schaefer highlighted an important trend which is probably getting far less coverage than it should.

Source: https://www.socialmediatoday.com/news/social-media-interactions-are-changing-heres-why-thats-important/513658/

Schaefer actually took it a step further than that:

“I think this graph represents one of the most significant trends in the recent history of marketing … and yet there is relatively little conversation about it. Social interaction is migrating away from the public view into private spaces.”

Social Media Interactions are Changing - Here's Why That's Important | Social Media Today

No doubt you’re at least somewhat aware of this – both Facebook Messenger and WhatsApp now have 1.3 billion users each, and both, as the chart shows, are seeing massive growth in comparison to your usual social platforms.

As social networking, as a concept, has expanded, so too have the risks and concerns with public posting. The data suggests that people are becoming more wary, more inclined to converse in smaller groups, as opposed to broadcasting everything. While the capacity to share with everyone is great, most conversations are probably better within a more refined group of friends and connections.

Even the social networks themselves have acknowledged this, and have moved to offer tools which cater to such usage – Facebook, for example, has put a bigger emphasis on groups this year, aligning with the trend towards more specific discussions, as opposed to the ‘public square’ approach.

But they’re actually going even further than that – Instagram’s been testing out a new ‘Lists’ feature which enables users to share posts and Stories with selected groups of friends only, creating a level of exclusivity and intimacy via their personal lists within the app.

Social Media Interactions are Changing - Here's Why That's Important

Instagram’s also considering splitting messages into its own separate app, further separating the public and private elements – they would only be seeking to do so if they saw a clear usage trend moving in this direction.

Facebook too is working on its own private sharing – or limited sharing – tools.

The shift is important to note, because it’s a different way of using social networks, requiring a different approach to connect with users. The main brand solution offered on this front thus far would be Messenger Bots, enabling simple, one-to-one communication, without the need for dedicated staff labor – but bots haven’t seen wide take-up as yet.

So what else should businesses do – what approach should they be taking to ensure they’re moving in line with audience trends and tapping into this new shift?

Creating more private, intimate brand connection is hard, and can easily veer into intrusive territory, but the broader impetus appears to highlight a need for more focus on brand communities, on building groups and participating in relevant conversations to help enhance your business standing, and give you a way into that more direct communication.

Content would be a key step, highlighting your expertize and willingness to provide valuable, relevant advice, but responsiveness is also critical – and that does require a dedicated human touch.

15 Reasons Why Chatbots Are The Holy Grail For Digital Marketers And Brands

Source: 15 Reasons Why Chatbots Are The Holy Grail For Digital Marketers And Brands

15 Reasons Why Chatbots Are The Holy Grail For Digital Marketers And Brands

At Heyday, we’ve been evangelizing brands on the virtues of bots for nearly a year now. 2016 was a year of experimentation and education. Marketers would chat with us out of sheer curiosity, but most of them were not ready to take the leap and invest in the space just yet. In 2017, the vibe of the market is completely different. Marketers are now grasping the opportunity to build a one-on-one communication channel with their customers and they’re starting to embrace fully this new medium. Big things are about to happen and we can’t wait to share with you what we’ve been cooking later this year.

In the meantime, here’s a homemade infographic we created as supporting data when chatting with potential clients who are unfamiliar with the chatbot space.

Feel free to share your own interesting stats in the comments section 🙂

SOCIALYSE BELGIUM (POWERED BY HAVAS MEDIA GROUP) ZOEKT EEN SOCIAL EDITOR NL (M/V)

Socialyse is de internationale social media afdeling van de Havas Media groep. Als volledig onafhankelijke pure-player bestaat Socialyse Belgium uit meer dan 12 social media specialisten. Dit departement ontwikkelt en implementeert globale marketingstrategieën op social media voor merken. Socialyse is vertegenwoordigd in meer dan 50 landen en staat voor expertise en doeltreffendheid op het gebied van social strategy. Een dynamisch en gepassioneerd team begeleidt merken bij het opstellen en structuur brengen in een social advertising ecosystem dat hen in staat stelt om nieuwe, groeiende markten aan te boren en om aan reputatiemanagement te doen.

Socialyse heeft een compleet sociaal aanbod dat uniek is op de markt en dat een breed spectrum van competenties omvat, gaande van strategische conceptualisering tot de analyse van social media campagnes (social strategy, social content creation, media, community management, social data & analytics).

Beschrijving van de functie

Als deel van het social media departement zal je bezig zijn met alle aspecten van het gebruik van social media voor merken en deze aspecten ook moeten samenbrengen. Je krijgt verschillende sociale en digitale projecten voorgeschoteld om uit te werken. In het begin word je hierin begeleid maar het is de bedoeling dat je dit op langere termijn autonoom kan doen. Deze projecten variëren naargelang de sector (auto, FMCG, bank & verzekering …)

Je takenpakket houdt in:

– Opstellen van content strategieën op korte, middellange of lange termijn voor merken in verschillende sectoren

– Curatie & productie van content, aangevuld met redactie en publicatie

– Social media conversation, conversation measurement & social monitoring

– Opstellen van reportings met analyse van de resultaten en benchmarks

Jouw profiel:

Je hebt voeling met webredactie en schrijft foutloos

Je bent iemand die leergierig en creatief is en je kan zelfstandig werken

De digitale wereld, sociale media en technologische nieuwigheden interesseren je

Je hebt een opleiding communicatie, journalistiek of gelijkwaardig genoten*

Nederlands is je moedertaal en je spreekt een aardig mondje Frans en Engels

Je kan werken met Office en Photoshop, kennis van Adobe Creative en videobewerking is een plus

Een eerste ervaring in de sector is een pluspunt

Het aanbod

– je krijgt een voltijds contract van onbepaalde duur

– je komt terecht in een jong team en een dynamische werkomgeving van een bedrijf dat voortdurend evolueert

– een job in een bruisende onderneming in hartje Brussel, gelegen in een levendige en aangename buurt

Zin om ons team te vervolledigen?

Stuur dan je CV met motivatiebrief naar Françoise via francoise.raes@socialyse.net

Big Brand Theory: KLM Uses Social to Meet Customers Where They Interact | Social Media Today

Big Brand Theory: KLM Uses Social to Meet Customers Where They Interact | Social Media Today.

KLM Royal Dutch Airlines is the poster child for social media customer service. The story of their social media “awakening” is well-known – in 2010, amidst the mass-confusion caused by the grounding of thousands of flights around the world due to the Eyafjallajokull Volcano eruption in Iceland, KLM needed a way to better communicate with it’s customers. So they turned to social media. Since then, KLM’s social team has grown from a makeshift assortment of customer service agents to a 150-strong social team, offering 24/7 service in 14 languages on FacebookTwitter and Vkontakte and answering 60,000+ social-originated queries per week. The move has been a major success for the airline – last year, at Econsultancy’s Festival of Marketing, KLM’s social media manager Karlijn Vogel-Meijer said that they’re now generating €25m ($US27.3m) in sales, per year, that they can directly attribute to their social mediaefforts. That’s no small feat – so how do they do it? I got a chance to speak with Vogel-Meijer to find out just how KLM goes about their social media process.

Trial and Error

KLM is a ninety-five year-old company that flies to sixty-seven nations around the world, a huge breadth of customers to cater for, and a significant legacy to carry. Given this, and the airline’s focus on social customer service, I asked Vogel-Meijer how the company approaches social media and whether they have a core mission or vision they aspire to in their social interactions.

“Our strategy is very simple and based upon three pillars: service, brand & reputation and commerce,” Vogel-Meijer said. “We believe service is the basis of everything we do on social and the reason why people follow us. You can ask us anything, 24/7, and we’ll reply within one hour.” This sounds like a lofty goal, but it’s true, various surveys and reports have praised KLM’s social media responsiveness – last year,Social Bakers rated KLM as the number one “Socially Devoted” brand globally, with data showing that they responded to 98.5% of the 80,000 questions posed to them on Facebook, while doing so 3 hours faster than the airline industry average. KLM is so dedicated to the task of quick response that they display their average response time – updated every 5 minutes – on their Twitter profile background. Clearly, social media response time is something the airline take very, very seriously.

Big Brand Theory: KLM Uses Social to Meet Customers Where They Interact | Social Media Today“If people don’t have anything to ask us, we still want to be present in their timelines,” Vogel-Meijer continued. “People only follow a limited number of brands, so our content needs to be relevant and worth sharing.”

“We believe that social is a new world, and it’s changing on a daily basis. That implies that you should not be afraid to make mistakes – it’s all about trial and error. If you’re afraid to make mistakes, don’t go on social.”

Honestly, this is some of the best advice I’ve heard on social – no one has all the answers, platforms and audience behaviors are evolving each day. While general guidelines and advice are always helpful, the only true rule of social media is that your audience rules, and the only way to understand what will resonate is to work with them and experiment with what’s possible – it’s inspiring to hear this type of advice from such a huge, successful company.

Primary Platforms

KLM has a strong presence on all the major social platforms, including over 1.84 million followers onTwitter and 9.3 million on Facebook. I asked Vogel-Meijer which, if any, they would consider their primary platforms in social.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eL2lWn7oup4

“We want to be where our customers are, so in that sense, Facebook, Twitter and Linkedin are top of mind,” Vogel-Meijer said. “But that doesn’t cover the whole world. In China we’re active on WeChat and Sina Weibo, in Korea on Kakao Talk and in Russia on VKontakte.” KLM’s commitment to social is also always evolving – in February this year KLM started testing the use of WhatsApp with members of its “Flying Blue” frequent-flier program. KLM has also taken the advanced step of allowing customers to book flights via tweet or Facebook post.

“We believe in giving our customers access to all KLM services on the platforms where they are present – because why should we redirect you to the KLM website if we can offer you the opportunity to book a flight via a tweet or a post?” Vogel-Meijer said. “Twitter’s testing a buy now button in the US, that would definitely be something we’re interested in. We also have two twitterbots @KLMfares and @KLMflights – with @KLMfares, you’re able to get the best fares to a certain destination and period via one tweet. Via @KLMflights you can see, in one instant, if your flight is on time by sending us a single tweet. And we’re working on some other options to make it as easy as possible for our customers.”

KLM also has a growing Instagram presence, in-line with consumer trends – Instagram is the fastest growing social media platform in the world right now.

“Yes, Instagram has our full focus, especially since they opened up the platform for advertising,” Vogel-Meijer said. “The Facebook/Instagram combination is extremely interesting. Instagram’s about inspiration and storytelling, you shouldn’t use it as Facebook. But if we use the strengths of Instagram in combination with Facebook we can tell an inspiring story to our fans and customers via multiple platforms, which is great.”

https://instagram.com/p/48lpoAkPxf/embed/captioned/?v=4

On Analytics 

Given their social focus, and the linking of their social interactions to direct ROI, I asked Vogel-Meijer what analytics and numbers KLM focuses on in social, how they measure performance.

“We measure everything and compare data constantly,” Vogel-Meijer said. “We focus on response time and the number of cases, in relation to service; on reach and engagement, when it’s about brand; and we measure commerce via last click, 28 days cookie time, via our internal measurement tool. But we also look at Facebook post view conversions.”

Using last click attribution is how KLM has ascertained that €25m figure attached to their social presence, but the general measures of response times, reach and engagement also play an active part in their strategic planning.

Social Differentiation

Looking at all the various measures and social systems in place at KLM, it’s clear that the company has made social a core part of their overall strategy. Indeed, social interaction is now engrained into their company, integral to their operations and day-to-day procedures. Given this, I finished up our conversation by asking Vogel-Meijer about what she sees as the true value of social media.

“The true value of social media is two-way, honest communication between a customer and a brand,” Vogel-Meijer said. “That’s what differentiates it from other channels in display, SEO and mail.”

While on the surface Vogel-Meijer’s answer seems straight-forward, the two terms that stand out are “two-way” and “honest”, and you’d be hard pressed to find another brand as committed to these two elements as KLM. These two, fundamental principles are at the core of their success in social media – and really, should be at the core of any brand’s social media process.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NK-T_t166TY

KLM started in social by simply jumping in – people needed answers, here was a medium that would enable them to provide that, quickly and at scale. The necessity of the situation awakened them to the opportunities of the medium, to the possibilities for customer service improvement and advancement of their communications process.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ef7n2s3j-BU

Since then, they’ve built their customer service more and more around this – because that’s what their customers want, that’s where their customers interact. It took that initial courage, that bravado in the first instance, to put themselves out there, something many brands remain hesitant to fully embrace. But KLM shows that, for those that do, the benefits of social can be huge. A truly inspiring social brand.