Apple and Twitter and Snapchat use human editors, but Facebook doesn’t – Fortune

Apple and Twitter and Snapchat use human editors, but Facebook doesn’t – Fortune.

Using human beings to do curation or aggregation works for some purposes, but not for others.

It’s gone from one or two examples to a bona fide trend—which, as any journalist knows, occurs whenever there is least three of something. The trend in this case is the hiring of human editors to filter through the news, music, and other forms of content that are being produced and/or hosted by a variety of platforms. So Apple is hiring editors for its News app, which it announced at its recent developer conference, as well as editor/DJs for the streaming music service the company is rolling out soon.

Meanwhile, Snapchat is also hiringjournalists to report and edit content related to the upcoming U.S. election, and Twitter is looking to add editorswho can filter and aggregate tweets and links related to trending topics on the network, as part of what the company calls Project Lightning. LinkedIn also recently announced it is adding human editors to its Pulse news-recommendation feature, and Instagram has started doing some curation for its new Explore page.

There are a couple of big names missing from this list that are pretty influential when it comes to news: Namely, Facebook and Google. Facebook is launching a new featurecalled Instant Articles with partners like the New York Times, but the site’s staff won’t have anything to do with the selection of stories that become part of the program—and the choice of who sees them and when will be left to Facebook’s all-powerful algorithm. Much like Facebook, Google’s services are also powered completely by algorithms.

Of course, algorithms aren’t autonomous robots, but software that is written and programmed by human beings to have certain attributes. So in a sense, the “humans vs. algorithms” debate is based on a misconception. But it’s probably fair to say the human input in an algorithm-driven model is one step removed from the action, compared to human editing.

So if Apple and Twitter and Snapchat and LinkedIn see the value of having human editors selecting news or curating content of various kinds, why wouldn’t Facebook and Google do the same? Because each of the latter two companies are involved in content that’s on a completely different scale than Apple or Twitter—and human beings don’t scale very well.

Technology analyst Ben Thompson made this point in a recent blog post, entitled “Curation and Algorithms.”There are some things that human curation is good for, and some things that it isn’t, he argues. For example, music and other emotional forms of content can be good candidates for curation because human beings perceive things about that content that algorithms might miss. So when Jimmy Iovine talked about the launch of the new Apple Music service, he said:

“The only song that matters as much as the song you’re listening to right now is the one that follows this. Picture this: you’re in a special moment, and the next song comes on… BZZZZZ, Buzzkill! It probably happened because it was programmed by an algorithm alone. Algorithms alone can’t do that emotional task. You need a human touch.”

But there are cases in which curation done by human beings simply doesn’t work, Thompson says—and Google and Facebook are two examples of that, but for very different reasons. Google’s job is to filter through all of the billions of webpages and content on the web and find the one thing that a user needs or wants to find, and that’s a task that would be impossible for even a gigantic group of human editors to accomplish (although Google does use small teams of humans to check link quality). That’s why Yahoo stopped trying to run a human-edited directory.

Facebook, by contrast, isn’t trying to filter all of the world’s information—or at least, not yet. It’s trying to find the right combination of text and photos and links and video that will appeal to every one of its billions of users, and get them to engage with the site as much as possible. So unlike Google, the supply of information it is trying to filter may not be infinite, but the personalization of that content for each of its users involves so many permutations and combinations that it would also be almost impossible to accomplish with a staff of human editors, even a large one.

“Google is seeking the single best answer to a direct query from an effectively infinite number of data points… For most queries there is one right answer that Google will return to anyone who searches for the term in question. In short, the data set is infinite (which means no human is capable of doing the job), but the target is finite. Facebook, on the other hand, creates a unique news feed for all of its 1.44 billion users… what is infinite are the number of targets.”

The news, by contrast, is something where human editors can perform a fairly useful function, and even add things that algorithms can’t, Thompson says (which is one reason why Techmeme founder Gabe Riverastopped using only algorithms to power his news portal in 2008, and started hiring human beings). The pool of information isn’t infinite, as it is with Google, but neither is the personalization required for the potential audience, as it is with Facebook. That’s why newspapers existed.

As Thompson notes, however, the risk is that human-edited services face—rightly or wrongly—much more criticism when they make decisions about what to show and what not to show than algorithm-powered networks. So Facebook and Google can to some extent argue that they don’t control what gets displayed directly, it’s just the algorithm (although there are a lot of problems with this defense, obviously).

If Apple’s human editors remove news stories about specific topics, there’s going to be a lot of negative attention. What journalistic considerations—if any—do platforms like Apple and Snapchat and Twitter have when it comes to the news? As distribution shifts to these large-scale networks, those kinds of questions are going to become even more important.

How Mad Men Missed The Social Media Revolution

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Source: http://www.forbes.com/sites/dinagachman/2015/04/02/how-mad-men-missed-the-social-media-revolution/?utm_campaign=ForbesTech&utm_source=TWITTER&utm_medium=social&utm_channel=Technology&linkId=13302206

But even with a devoted fan base, Mad Men isn’t exactly a social mediaphenomenon like The Walking Dead or Pretty Little Liars. If Don Draper handled the show’s marketing campaign, it might be a different story.

Even so, Twitter TWTR -0.1% buzz about Mad Men has been escalating leading up to the April 5 season premiere. About a month ago, the show averaged around 2,000 tweets per day, and the number hit around 14,300 daily tweets on March 24th, when news broke that star Jon Hamm had checked out of rehab.

Search is the most predictive digital metric for audiences aged 35 and up, according to Tobi Bauckhage, CEO of Moviepilot, an online platform that empowers film fans to become content creators. Five days leading up to Sunday’s premiere, Mad Men’s search metric had approximately 88,000 searches, which was more than double the volume of fellow April debut Daredevil. Then again, Daredevilis a new show, and it doesn’t have a longtime fan base that is dying to know what becomes of Peggy, Joan, Roger, Pete, Betty, and, of course, Don.

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Maybe it’s a nod to Don Draper’s old-school ways (he’s a savant-like ad exec who doesn’t rely on trends to shape his campaigns), but Mad Men has focused on traditional marketing tactics like outdoor ads and media buys on TV, instead of Vine videos and Snapchat gimmicks. Does anyone who watchesMad Men actually use Snapchat? It’s pretty unlikely. It’s not as if the show’s marketing team is clueless when it comes to social media – they use Instagramand Twitter like everyone else – but the majority of the show’s audience probably isn’t staring at Instagram as they watch.

So maybe Mad Men never became a Twitter phenomenon like Pretty Little Liars, but they’re two completely different shows. There could be some audience overlap there, since being well-rounded means you watch both intellectual period dramas and light, campy teen murder mysteries. In the end,Mad Men’s popularity never relied on retweets, and it’ll still go down in history as one of the most accomplished dramas on television, with or without astronomical search numbers.

The true fans will be tweeting their hearts out throughout this final season, and I’ll be on the edge of my seat wondering what in the world is going to become of Peggy. And Joan. And Betty. And Don.

Whatever the final numbers are, there’ll probably be at least a few tweets that read: I wish it didn’t have to end.

10 of the most important tweets in its history (TIME)

Twitter Looks Back on Its 9-Year History, in Tweets | TIME.

What in the World is the Meerkat App? – IGN

What in the World is the Meerkat App? – IGN.

If you’ve been reading any kind of news (or your Twitter feed), you may have been wondering why everyone’s been talking about a small, furry mammal as of late. But the Meerkat in question isn’t a fuzzy animal native to Africa; it’s a livestreaming app that launched March 10th and gained traction thanks to buzz at SXSW.

How does it work? Meerkat connects your phone camera to your Twitter feed; once you’ve installed the app, you type in a status and hit the “stream” button—and just like that, a link goes out to your Twitter followers with live video from wherever it is you’re pointing the camera.

The hope behind the app is that it (and others like it) will expand the reach of citizen journalism. At the moment, when events happen in the world, they’re tweeted and hashtagged, and people can follow along on Facebook and Twitter. By also using an streaming app like Meerkat, broadcasters can share what they’re seeing as it unfolds. Things like riots and protests could be viewed in real-time without any form of private or governmental filters.

But why the fuss over Meerkat specifically, when there are others like it? That has to do with the relationship it has with Twitter. Originally, the app pulled information about your Twitter followers from Twitter itself, so that it could immediately connect you with those people on Meerkat. But Twitter—who recently acquired a similar app called Periscope—was none too happy with Meerkat and crippled the app’s reach. (A tweet still goes out via the app, but it no longer can access the “social” part of the social network.) Naturally, that drew a ton of attention to this brand-new app.

To be Meerkat-famous, you’ll first need to be Twitter-famous.

Now if you want to find other people and their streams, you’ll have to catch all of it via the Meerkat app directly. There already some famous people who’ve wholeheartedly embraced it, like Late Night host Jimmy Fallon. (Who, with his 23 million followers, may havetemporarily broken the service.) You can also catch novel bits of journalism, like Jimmy Kimmel being interviewed by USA Today as it happens.

Will the app take off beyond this initial burst of attention? It’s unclear. When Twitter first hit the scene, no one could imagine the usefulness of a service that limited you to 140 characters. Now its seen as a crucial part of any brand’s social media presence. Let’s Plays gave way to Twitch streaming and now people make a comfortable living doing commentary while they play through Minecraft or Destiny. If used effectively (not just for boring or creepy purposes), Meerkat could fuel the growth of a new way to keep people informed, complete with its own breakout stars.

But given that people need to be following you on Twitter to see what you’re doing on Meerkat, building a fanbase for one app through another app seems like a daunting task. To be Meerkat-famous, you’ll first need to be Twitter-famous. If Meerkat can shake off its association with Twitter (which Twitter would be happy with, no doubt), it could be the “next big thing.” Or it could be another high profile app that goes nowhere. IGN Logo

Social Plateform – Active Users Growth (US 2014) – Facebook: -9%, Linkedin: +38%, Instagram: +47%, Twitter: +7%

People were actually using Facebook less last year.

Facebook was the only major social network to experience a drop in active usage in 2014, falling by nine per cent compared to the previous year.

However, it is still by far the most popular social network outside of China, according to researchers from Global Web Index, with 81 per cent of internet users claiming to be members of the site.

Facebook’s decline, measured in the rate of people actively using the site per month over the year, was most marked in Asia, with native sites like WeChat and Qzone dominating.

Pinterest and Tumblr experienced huge growth in 2014, with a surge of 97 per cent and 95 per cent respectively, while usage at Instagram and LinkedIn went up by 47 per cent and 38 per cent respectively.

Snapchat was the fastest growing app in 2014 with a 57 per cent increase on 2013 figures.

YouTube was visited by 82 per cent of internet users between the ages of 16 and 64, which puts it ahead of Facebook, which was ‘only’ visited by 73 per cent of active users.

HashtagBowl 2014 : 57% of the 54 Super Bowl ads / Facebook 9% / Twitter 7%

HashtagBowl 2015 returns during Super Bowl XLIX TV ads – Online Social Media.

Marketing Land will be returning its brilliant #HashtagBowl starting February 1, 2015, this is where they will for the fourth consecutive year track all social media during the games.

During the Super Bowl 49 XLIX TV ads ‘Marketing Land’ will be tracking all the social media, such as Twitter, Facebook, Google Plus, Pinterest, YouTube, Instagram and hashtags.

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Back in 2012 there was only 25 percent of all national commercials mentioned hashtags or social media accounts, in 2013 there were just over half of all TV ads having a hashtag or some social media mention.

2014 was interesting for the hashtag mentions during the Super Bowl TV ads, hashtags were mentioned in more than 57% of Super Bowl ads. Here are the overall stats for 2014 54 national ads reviewed: Hashtags: 31 total with 57% of ads overall, Facebook: 5 total with 9% of ads overall, Twitter: 4 total, 7%, YouTube: 3 total, 6%, Shazam: 2 total, 4% and URLs: 22 total, 41% of ads overall.

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How will the hashtag fair this year during the Super Bowl 2015 commercials?

We will update this article when the time is right. In the meantime please do visit Marketing Land, as they will be announcing the winner and share its analysis of how well Super Bowl advertisers used social media and online marketing into their ads when the game is over.

Twitter et Socialyse mesurent l’amplification du réseau social sur la TV – Offremedia

Twitter et Socialyse mesurent l’amplification du réseau social sur la TV – Offremedia.

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Twitter France a présenté hier, avec Socialyse, l’entité social media du groupe Havas, les résultats de l’étude «TVxTwitter», menée en octobre dernier, qui décrypte la place du réseau social dans les nouvelles formes de consommation télévisuelle.
A cette occasion, ont été présentés les résultats d’une étude réalisée sur 3 annonceurs de 3 secteurs différents (énergie, entertainment audiovisuel, banque-assurance). Ils montrent l’amplification de l’impact de la communication auprès des personnes exposées à la TV + Twitter versus à la TV seulement, sur les critères d’émotion, de proximité, de considération d’achat et de recommandation, ainsi que sur les valeurs de la marque : innovante (x2,3), fun (x2,6), enthousiasmante (x3,5), audacieuse (x2,8), tendance (x2,2), à l’écoute (x2,8), de confiance (x1,8).

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Ainsi, lors du dispositif TV/Twitter d’EDF mis en place par Havas Media pour le match de football France-Espagne le 4 septembre (voir archive), 69% des personnes exposées à Twitter+TV ont trouvé la marque innovante, vs 38% des exposés TV seulement, et 60% se sont senties proches de la marque, vs 37% des exposés TV seulement.
A partir d’une étude réalisée auprès de 1 007 utilisateurs (30 derniers jours) de Twitter, âgés de 18 ans et plus, quatre profils de comportements ont été dégagés : les @adict (10%) qui ne peuvent pas se passer de Twitter devant la TV ; les @core (24%) gros consommateurs de la TV et de Twitter ; les @casual (39%) qui ont besoin de valeur ajoutée pour utiliser le réseau devant la TV ; et les @distant (27%) qui n’utilisent pas le réseau social devant leur poste.

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Parmi les personnes utilisant Twitter devant la TV, 72% déclarent chercher du contenu additionnel en lien avec le programme qu’ils regardent et 66% vont chercher des contenus exclusifs. Pour 2 personnes sur 3, Twitter permet de voir s’il y a un programme «dont tout le monde parle» et 1 sur 3 choisit de regarder un programme s’il est très discuté sur Twitter.
Une personne sur deux retweete des marques parce qu’elle aime le contenu, deux sur cinq pour participer à des jeux concours et une sur trois pour bénéficier d’offres exclusives.
Autre résultat de l’étude, à prendre en compte pour les marques qui veulent engager leur audience : les deux éléments qui apportent le plus de valeur dans un tweet sont, pour les personnes sondées, l’humour et le fait d’apprendre quelque chose de nouveau.

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Foodporn: Why do we care ? Why do we share ? (Slideshare – Karen Fewell)

First of all, let’s have a look at why people share food photographs across our social channels. We came across this insightful Slideshare presentation from Karen Fewell, Managing Director at Digital Blonde, highlighting key research findings focusing on this topic.

The main reason behind sharing food images is because they are proud of what they have made, followed by recording a special moment or occasion, then because the food looks like art. We liked this slide in particular from one of the respondents, who concludes an interesting approach to this trend.

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Manchester City digital companion: Live video channels, stats, second scree, vine and more

On en a maintenant l’habitude, Manchester City est un des clubs les plus actifs en terme de dispositifs digitaux. Et leur nouvelle application en témoigne encore une fois.

Le club Mancunien est le premier à lancer une application second screen pour suivre les matchs en direct. L’application propose des stats en temps réel, des vidéos ainsi que du contenu sur les coulisses des matches.

Comme l’indique le club, l’application Match day commence des le réveil, le match dure 90 minutes mais un jour de match, c’est bien plus que ces 90 minutes.

Ainsi avec cette appli, le club propose a ses fans de passer la journée entière à préparer le match du soir. Les spectateurs qui utiliseront l’app dans l’enceinte du stade se verront également privilégiés car ils pourront accéder a du contenu vidéo additionnel non accessible de chez soi.

Enfin, l’appli permettra de favoriser les échanges entre fans puisqu’elle donnera la possibilité à tous de partager photos, tweets ou autres vines…

Japanese is the second most tweeted language (30% of the internet users): Discover local social TV strategies !

Japanese TV Execs Share Social Media Strategies at Tokyo Content Market.

Japan has long been called one of the world’s most Twitter-savvy nations. After all, Japanese is the second most tweeted language behind English, and some 30 percent of the country’s Internet users are said to be on Twitter.

On day two of the Tokyo International Film Festival’s content market, TIFFCOM, TV executives gathered for a panel discussion to share strategies and case studies on how local networks are leveraging the platform to reach, engage and retain audiences.

Kicking off the presentation, entitled “The Audience Strikes Back: How to Engage Television Audiences Through Mobile and Social Media,” Masaki Hamura, managing director of digital creative agency AKQA, made the basic case for why TV producers need to be more aggressive about integrating social media into their content.

Read more Tokyo Content Market Opens With Record Attendance

“Social interaction always affects one’s primary experience,” he said. “For example, if you see a beautiful sunset, that’s probably pretty memorable. But if you see the same sunset with your daughter, it’s going to be more significant because you’ve shared it.”

Hamura, who recently served as head of brand strategy for Twitter in Japan, said that TV viewing has always been a social activity best enjoyed with family or friends, but social media has made this possible across distances and with larger groups. “I often turn on my TV because I see all my friends talking about some show on Twitter,” he added.

Mikiko Nishiyama, a senior director at Nippon TV, Japan’s oldest and highest-rated commercial broadcaster, then took the podium to share some of the innovative ways in which Japanese networks are utilizing Twitter and mobile apps.

The broadcaster’s drama Piece Vote, which launched in 2011 and airs at midnight, has begun featuring an on-screen overlay of live tweets from viewers. “While watching the program, you can also watch the response from other viewers,” Nishiyama said. “Often the response is as entertaining as the action. Our producers choose the tweets. It’s a highly interactive way of watching TV.”

The network’s recent dating show Tweet Love – with the tagline “her love life is in your hands” – goes a step further. Co-developed by Sony Pictures U.K., the format features a young single woman and three male suitors. Much like conventional dating shows, the bachelors are profiled in their daily lives and each gives performances and engages in various competitions in an effort to impress and win the interest of the woman. The key difference: she is unable to see the bachelors themselves. Instead, viewers tweet their reactions and impressions and select tweets are presented to her on three floating screens. It’s not until she makes a choice that she sees the various contestants and interacts with them directly – with still more action later determined by viewer tweets. Rather than merely supplementing the viewing experience, viewers’ tweets dictate every aspect of the action.

Read more International Business Themes Dominate Tokyo Market Seminars

Nippon has also developed an app to interact with its various programming. Named “Furi Furi TV,” which translates to “shake shake TV,” the app makes shows into interactive games that viewers play by shaking their smart phones at key moments during broadcast.

For example, during Nippon TV’s recent airing of The Amazing Spider-Man, if viewers shook their phone anytime Spider-Man shot a spider web, they could win points and prizes provided by advertisers. The app also has social network integration so viewers can compete against their friends while watching. During music programming, audiences can win points by shaking and dancing with their phones in synch with the music.

“The idea is to create engagement and viewer participation, while also creating a new channel for advertisers and sponsors, said Nishiyama. “The response was greater than we expected.”

Twitter users in Japan set a world record of 143,199 tweets per second in Aug. 2013 by tweeting “balus” during a television broadcast of Hayao Miyazaki‘s anime classic Castle in the Sky (Tenku no Shiro Rapyuta). A magic word in the Miyazaki universe, “balus” triggers a spell of destruction when said by characters at the beloved film’s climax. Germany’s soccer World Cup blowout of Brazil during the summer set a record of 580,000 tweets per minute, but Japan still owns the per-second title.